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How to make a strap-on KB look even more awkward


MonksDream

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Whoa

 

That thing looks hard to play.

Watch the videos. The thing wont stay still. Makes me proud to be Canadian. :D

Instrumentation is meaningless - a song either stands on its own merit, or it requires bells and whistles to cover its lack of adequacy, much less quality. - kanker
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The only good reasons to curve the board would be to give you a greater key range in a smaller area and to maintain a consistent playing distance over that range. However both those advantages are lost if the thing won't stay still and you have to keep adjusting its position while you play. I'd love to hear from someone involved with this thing.
Instrumentation is meaningless - a song either stands on its own merit, or it requires bells and whistles to cover its lack of adequacy, much less quality. - kanker
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The only good reasons to curve the board would be to give you a greater key range in a smaller area and to maintain a consistent playing distance over that range. However both those advantages are lost if the thing won't stay still and you have to keep adjusting its position while you play.
And I thought the main idea of a keytar was freedom of movement on stage. The guy in the video looks afraid to move an inch or he'll lose the keyboard. :)
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Rember Jan Hammer bad a cool Looking Keytar. I can't find the image and I don't know if It was a Lync because none those look like it. The case had a flow to it and the pitch and mod wheels were mounted on round neck that came to a point. Not like those stupid stick necks

 

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Rember Jan Hammer bad a cool Looking Keytar. I can't find the image and I don't know if It was a Lync because none those look like it. The case had a flow to it and the pitch and mod wheels were mounted on round neck that came to a point. Not like those stupid stick necks

I remember that. Jan was the first person I ever saw use a keytar. Now I wonder who was the first notable player to use one?
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loved the ideas you guys put up

 

but regards to this company ...in my eyes anyone who gives it a go and accepts the risks is alright by me...go for it

 

innovation and no guts do not go hand in hand...

 

but innovation and a will to succeed while looking down the barrel of non sling on keyboardists is a rare and brave thing

 

if this was in Australia I sure would give it a go...good or bad

 

as it is I literally pulled my Casio AZ1 sling on out for the first time in what seems like 20 years and used it in my new band...the guys loved it and I enjoyed it...

 

what comes to mind when I see this new one is an old photo from a keyboard magazine where a young fellow [probably 20 years ago?] had made a sling on that had curved the keys in the opposite plane...ie it still looked like a sling on but the actual keys were curved from octave to octave like a scimitar[they curved by being skinnier at the key tip and wider at the base so to speak]...now that was innovative from a home designer point of view

this was meant to be ergonomically more usable..it looked great too

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The only good reasons to curve the board would be to give you a greater key range in a smaller area and to maintain a consistent playing distance over that range

 

There's also the "wow" factor of a kbist lugging a case or gig bag that's over 1 foot thick..

"I never knew that music like that was possible." - Mozart ( Amadeus movie)
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The jokes here are funny--specially loved the keytar-pipe organ.

 

I don't like the music performed on that thing, and it also looks as though it would be very hard on the neck and upper back. And standing and playing and wandering around on a stage is not interesting to me, though if I performed the kind of music they seem to be pitching on this thing, I might be attracted to that.

 

THAT said, the idea of a curved keyboard that hangs low so your arms could be in a more relaxed and normal position seems like a good idea. Could be some ergonomic advantages--same reason people have proposed computer keyboards more in the shape of a sphere, as hands are when relaxed. The horizontal keyboard is not the best configuration from the standpoint of how the body works--it's just an artifact of the way a mechanical keyboard works, entrenched by tradition and no longer needed for digital keyboards. There could be some good benefits to such a keyboard, mounted on a stand.

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I am amused by the fact that the demos are separated by the style of music...as if someone would watch one of the videos and say, "Well, yeah...you can play Superstition on it, but I bet you can't play lounge music on it!!"

 

Apparently, you can't play country on it. No video for that.

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