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Horrible tension


BluMunk

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I had an epiphany yesterday about my piano playing. Interestingly, it didn't happen while playing piano.

 

I was playing bocce with some friends outside, and waiting for my turn, I was tossing the balls up and down. Throwing the heavy bocce ball up and down with my left hand, I was able to smoothly catch and toss it with gentle, fluid motion of my wrist.

 

However, with my right hand, I could not catch the ball with any give in my wrist. *thump* into my hand. Even focusing and really trying, I could not get my wrist to give at all while catching the ball.

 

I realized that when playing piano, my right hand is always the one that gives me trouble with speed and ease of motion. At rehearsal last night I was hyper-aware of my right hand, and it's incredibly rigid in comparison to my left.

 

I've always had a problem with tension and writing as well; a paragraph or so and my forearm/hand starts to cramp up and I need to pause.

 

I think this is something major (or has the possibility to turn into something major) and is worth trying to correct right away, both to help my ability and facility as a player, and to prevent me from screwing myself up physically down the road.

 

Does anyone else here have a similar issue and have any suggestions for exercises or anything like that?

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Before embarking on a new exercise regimen, see a doctor. You may have a medical problem from an old injury or something, and should get cleared for action first.

Moe

---

"I keep wanting to like it's sound, but every demo seems to demonstrate that it has the earth-shaking punch and peerless sonics of the Roland Gaia. " - Tusker

http://www.hotrodmotm.com

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I realized that when playing piano, my right hand is always the one that gives me trouble with speed and ease of motion.

 

 

I've always had a problem with tension and writing as well; a paragraph or so and my forearm/hand starts to cramp up and I need to pause.

 

I've written enough regarding that fly-away-wrist self check that I'll let someone else offer advice. :)

No guitarists were harmed during the making of this message.

 

In general, harmonic complexity is inversely proportional to the ratio between chording and non-chording instruments.

 

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excellent advice from Dave, but I have one addition to it - if you play/practice really long hours you'll end up sooner or later with some tension anyway, that's why it's important to massage you hands and arms, and even ice pack them after long sessions. It's really not that much different from practicing any competitive sport discipline, and they have always massage therapist handy.

Hmmm. I doubt Mr. Horne has a need for this.

"I'm so crazy, I don't know this is impossible! Hoo hoo!" - Daffy Duck

 

"The good news is that once you start piano you never have to worry about getting laid again. More time to practice!" - MOI

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  • 2 weeks later...

Dave, thanks for the link to the older thread. I'm trying to make sense of that technique. Does it also apply moving down the piano?

 

What I mean is, let's take a C scale. I totally get the "keeping the thumb glued to the index finger," and not tucking it under when running up the scale. It's actually kind of easy and after working on it a bit I think I've already seen an increase in speed and accuracy. But, going down the scale do you do the same? I'm having a really hard time not crossing over my thumb with my ring finger going down the scale; picking up my whole hand and putting it down in the new position in that direction seems strange, and at least for me accuracy is a challenge.

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Keep your fingers parallel to the keys and just lower the thumb over the note you want instead of moving the thumb laterally under your hand (or laterally away from your hand) in anticipation of the note.

 

One of these days I'll post a video of this.

 

 

No guitarists were harmed during the making of this message.

 

In general, harmonic complexity is inversely proportional to the ratio between chording and non-chording instruments.

 

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If you cannot get your right hand to loosen up, you might want to consider seeing an orthopedist. If he cannot help or has no answers, you might want to consider seeing a neurologist. Are any other parts of your right side more tense than your left?

Yamaha CP-73, Hammond SK Pro 73, Yamaha MODX 7, Roland Fantom 06, Roland VK-8M, Yamaha FS1R

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