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I've always liked the idea of a twenty-three fretter, myself... :thu: For real!

 

That is pretty cool, I like the idea of the body on that, that could be a cool and different sound; bet it would sound very good for slide. With the neck-pickup pushed further to the rear by the extended 25-fret fretboard, it would actually have a fatter neck-pickup tone for really high notes- which suits slide-playing nicely.

Ask yourself- What Would Ren and Stimpy Do?

 

~ Caevan James-Michael Miller-O'Shite ~

_ ___ _ Leprechaun, Esquire _ ___ _

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The idea of a steel guitar, a real steel geetar, is more interesting to me than the number of frets...

 

Oh, yeah, being a hollow steel bodied guitar is the primary feature there- but the way the extended fretboard repositions the neck-pickup location is another design detail that will definitely have a big effect on its overall tone and playing characteristics.

 

...but I have to add that while my general motto has recently been "It could be worse" that may soon be changing...

 

I'm sorry to read that, half'... unless, I'm misunderstanding you there...

Ask yourself- What Would Ren and Stimpy Do?

 

~ Caevan James-Michael Miller-O'Shite ~

_ ___ _ Leprechaun, Esquire _ ___ _

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Interesting... with one warning. The aluminum guitars had a definite tuning problem, as the metal expanded and contracted a LOT under lights, with playing, etc. Could not keep the damned things in tune. What will happen with a metal body that is in contact with your body? I'm not sure. But I am curious. If one of you guys bites, I'll watch the progress with interest.

 

The number of frets shouldn't matter for slide, surely?

 

I've had 24 fret guitars, and after a time I came to understand that I just didn't really play up there, it was a plus that turned out to be a big nothing for me. But I'm not a fancy or speedy lead player. But just because it is there, doesn't mean that I'd have to use it.

 

I have one other thought... at this stage of life I am trying to be smarter about what I buy. Will it have value? (Not just cash value... but will it become a valuable part of the arsenal, or just another box gathering dust in a closet?)

"I believe that entertainment can aspire to be art, and can become art, but if you set out to make art you're an idiot."

 

Steve Martin

 

Show business: we're all here because we're not all there.

 

 

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I had a Bean. Outdoor gigs were hell with its tuning stability, direct sunlight to shade threw it way out. When I brought it to jams in the winter, it took a lot longer to warm up from being in the trunk than a wood instrument.
Never a DUH! moment! Well, almost never. OK, OK! Sometimes never!
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The number of frets shouldn't matter for slide, surely?

 

Not directly, but the relocation of the neck-pickup dictated by that 25th-fret would make for fatter, rounder notes when playing up above the 12th-fret, especially from the 14th-position up- not unknown territory for a lot of electric-slide players.

Ask yourself- What Would Ren and Stimpy Do?

 

~ Caevan James-Michael Miller-O'Shite ~

_ ___ _ Leprechaun, Esquire _ ___ _

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I mentioned ther were 25 frets because I had never seen a neck with that number of frets before. I've seen a lot of 24 fret necks, and a few with ridiculous numbers of frets, like a Danelectro Guitarlin, or Uli Jon Roth's Sky guitars, but never one with just 25.

Always remember that you�re unique. Just like everyone else.

 

 

 

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Since anodizing metal seems to be a simple process you could do at home, this could be a cool project.

 

Can you anodize steel? I was under the impression that anodizing was for aluminum, but maybe I was wrong; I'll hafta look that up...

 

Aaaah, here's some info:

 

Anodic films are most commonly applied to protect aluminium alloys, although processes also exist for titanium, zinc, magnesium, and niobium.

 

This process is not a useful treatment for iron or carbon steel because these metals exfoliate when oxidized; i.e. the iron oxide (also known as rust) flakes off, constantly exposing the underlying metal to corrosion.

Ask yourself- What Would Ren and Stimpy Do?

 

~ Caevan James-Michael Miller-O'Shite ~

_ ___ _ Leprechaun, Esquire _ ___ _

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I've always liked the idea of a twenty-three fretter, myself... :thu: For real!

 

Why 23?

 

I've always liked 22, especially on a strat style for that hendrixy/srv neck pickup tone. I've had 24 fretter's and I didn't dig how the pickup moved that bit towards the bridge - less of an issue for humbackers than for single coils though IMHO.

 

The good thing about a 24 fret gtr is that upper fret access from about 17 and up is usually pretty good

 

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btw...

 

I once read in an interview that Steve Morse had 23 frets on his early musicman signature series to fit in the crazy 4 pickup set up he used then. However, whenever I saw pictures of the said model it had 22 frets.

 

Can anyone confirm or deny a 23 fret model?

 

Guitar Speak Podcast

www.guitarspeakpodcast.libsyn.com

https://www.facebook.com/guitarspeakpodcast

www.itunes.apple.com/au/podcast/guitar-speak-podcast

 

 

 

 

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I once read in an interview that Steve Morse had 23 frets on his early musicman signature series to fit in the crazy 4 pickup set up he used then. However, whenever I saw pictures of the said model it had 22 frets.

 

Can anyone confirm or deny a 23 fret model?

 

I remember reading about how Steve Morse had EB/MM remove the fretboard-end with the 24th-fret, and perhaps the 23rd as well, from some of his earlier sig-model guitars, and relocate the neck-pickup to its usual position relative to where the 24th-fret would go...

 

I've always liked the idea of a twenty-three fretter, myself... :thu: For real!

 

Why 23?

 

I've always liked 22, especially on a strat style for that hendrixy/srv neck pickup tone. I've had 24 fretter's and I didn't dig how the pickup moved that bit towards the bridge - less of an issue for humbackers than for single coils though IMHO.

 

'Cause most of the time I like the neck-pickup right where it usually is around the imaginary 24th-fret location, and one extra fret above the 22nd seems like a nice idea. And, admittedly, just to be a little bit different, too! :D:thu:

 

Now, -IF- you play up at the 14th position or higher, moving the neck-pickup further towards the bridge the way it is when you have 24 or more frets will give you even fatter, rounder single-note tones when you use the neck pickup, or neck-&-middle pickups.

 

If you doubt that, grab a Strat-styled axe, select the neck-pickup, and noodle around up at the 17th-fret position. Then, flip the switch to the middle-pickup, and play the same stuff; note how it's just gotten to sound more like the neck-pickup usually does.

 

That is because you've just turned on a pickup that is closer to the middle of the vibrating string length; the neck pickup usually is, until you get up past the 12th-fret...

Ask yourself- What Would Ren and Stimpy Do?

 

~ Caevan James-Michael Miller-O'Shite ~

_ ___ _ Leprechaun, Esquire _ ___ _

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I once read in an interview that Steve Morse had 23 frets on his early musicman signature series to fit in the crazy 4 pickup set up he used then. However, whenever I saw pictures of the said model it had 22 frets.

 

Can anyone confirm or deny a 23 fret model?

 

I remember reading about how Steve Morse had EB/MM remove the fretboard-end with the 24th-fret, and perhaps the 23rd as well, from some of his earlier sig-model guitars, and relocate the neck-pickup to its usual position relative to where the 24th-fret would go...

 

I've always liked the idea of a twenty-three fretter, myself... :thu: For real!

 

Why 23?

 

I've always liked 22, especially on a strat style for that hendrixy/srv neck pickup tone. I've had 24 fretter's and I didn't dig how the pickup moved that bit towards the bridge - less of an issue for humbackers than for single coils though IMHO.

 

'Cause most of the time I like the neck-pickup right where it usually is around the imaginary 24th-fret location, and one extra fret above the 22nd seems like a nice idea. And, admittedly, just to be a little bit different, too! :D:thu:

 

Now, -IF- you play up at the 14th position or higher, moving the neck-pickup further towards the bridge the way it is when you have 24 or more frets will give you even fatter, rounder single-note tones when you use the neck pickup, or neck-&-middle pickups.

 

If you doubt that, grab a Strat-styled axe, select the neck-pickup, and noodle around up at the 17th-fret position. Then, flip the switch to the middle-pickup, and play the same stuff; note how it's just gotten to sound more like the neck-pickup usually does.

 

That is because you've just turned on a pickup that is closer to the middle of the vibrating string length; the neck pickup usually is, until you get up past the 12th-fret...

 

 

I'll try that out and report back!

 

Guitar Speak Podcast

www.guitarspeakpodcast.libsyn.com

https://www.facebook.com/guitarspeakpodcast

www.itunes.apple.com/au/podcast/guitar-speak-podcast

 

 

 

 

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I mentioned ther were 25 frets because I had never seen a neck with that number of frets before. I've seen a lot of 24 fret necks, and a few with ridiculous numbers of frets, like a Danelectro Guitarlin, or Uli Jon Roth's Sky guitars, but never one with just 25.

 

I suppose if one wanted to solo way up in C..... :rolleyes:

Never a DUH! moment! Well, almost never. OK, OK! Sometimes never!
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I mentioned ther were 25 frets because I had never seen a neck with that number of frets before. I've seen a lot of 24 fret necks, and a few with ridiculous numbers of frets, like a Danelectro Guitarlin, or Uli Jon Roth's Sky guitars, but never one with just 25.

 

I suppose if one wanted to solo way up in C..... :rolleyes:

 

Might even be a case where the roll-off of a rosewood fretboard would finally please your ear, huh, Reif? (I mean treble-roll-off, not rolling off the fretboard! :D )

Ask yourself- What Would Ren and Stimpy Do?

 

~ Caevan James-Michael Miller-O'Shite ~

_ ___ _ Leprechaun, Esquire _ ___ _

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