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any GranTouch owners?


Dave Horne

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I have to make a repair on my GT1 myself and was wondering if anyone else here has had the same problem. My piano is 10 years old or so and about five years ago it started acting screwy. I would be playing and notes would start sustaining as though I were holding down the sustain pedal though, of course, I wasn't. Sometimes specific notes would ring without me using the pedal. As soon as I actually used the pedal the problem would disappear but would return again sometimes seconds later.

 

I called my local dealer (a friend who lived down the street from me) and he put me in touch with a repair guy. It turned out the part I needed replaced was the light source for the optical sensors; it consisted of 12 LEDs (one for each note I would assume) in a small plastic thingy. I paid about 100 for the labor and 60 for the part. Once I saw how easy the repair was I vowed to replace it myself the next time the problem returned.

 

Well, the problem returned and I am in the process of ordering the part. To easily get at the four screws a small right angle screwdriver is needed; without that special tool you'd have to remove a lot more (which I did the first time along with the repair guy).

 

At any rate, I'm passing this on and here's a photo of the part. It's about 10 cm wide and 1.5 cm wide. You can see the edges of those four screws on the topside of the thingy in the photo; two on each side of that ribbon connector.

 

Rather than post the photo here directly which was really big when I just previewed it, here's the link ...

 

http://members.home.nl/davehorne/grantouch.jpg

 

 

 

No guitarists were harmed during the making of this message.

 

In general, harmonic complexity is inversely proportional to the ratio between chording and non-chording instruments.

 

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Actually there's only one. When the repair guy replaced the thing he did it reversed and the piano played backwards if you know what I mean. I don't remember if it was the ribbon or the thing itself that was reversed, but that caused an interesting few moments.

 

At any rate, it's an easy repair and I'm assuming anyone with a GranTouch piano will experience the same problem after so many thousand hours of use.

No guitarists were harmed during the making of this message.

 

In general, harmonic complexity is inversely proportional to the ratio between chording and non-chording instruments.

 

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Thanks for the info! I picked up a GT-1 a few years ago used. They're really, really rare in the US. Yamaha decided that stupid Americans wanted to watch the keys go up and down on an electronic piano and switched to only selling the DGT2A with the solenoids!

 

Anyone ever have a piano tech adjust the action on a GT? Mine is a bit slow.

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Anyone ever have a piano tech adjust the action on a GT? Mine is a bit slow.

 

I had the key dip made ... deeper. There are paper washers under the keys and my local key came over removed them or most of them. I like a greater than standard key dip.

 

Also, after I had the piano for a number of years there was a fair amount of sideways play (from considerable playing) and the same tech replaced the felts that the rail pin (?) travels through. (I'm not sure of the correct terminology, a piano tech here can state it more accurately).

 

The GranTouch is not a perfect piano but it's a pretty good compromise.

 

After you've had your piano for a few more years and it starts acting screwy (like I described), you'll be able to replace the light source yourself. Rather than take the piano completely apart I'm now searching for a right angle screwdriver. If I can't find one at a cheap price I'll have the local metal shop weld a screw bit to a straight piece of metal and be done with it.

 

No guitarists were harmed during the making of this message.

 

In general, harmonic complexity is inversely proportional to the ratio between chording and non-chording instruments.

 

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The paper washers are called punchings and lie under a single cloth punching. Center rail (or balance rail) punchings adjust key height, and collectively key level. Front rail punchings adjust key dip. Each key has two pair of cloth key bushings to keep them snug at the front rail and center rail pins.

 

The front rail, center rail, and back rail, along with typically five perpendicular pieces make up the key frame. I have seen the cloth punchings and back rail cloth collectively referred to as "keybed felt". This is total nonsense. It's a key frame, not a keybed, and it's wool cloth, not felt.

 

Key bushings are also cloth and not felt. Hammers, dampers, upright backchecks, and numerous other parts are made of felt. There should be somebody here who knows more about all this, unless his interest in sheep is purely recreational. Can't make pianos without sheep.

 

 

 

 

 

--wmp
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I'm now searching for a right angle screwdriver. If I can't find one at a cheap price I'll have the local metal shop weld a screw bit to a straight piece of metal and be done with it.

 

I think this is what you are looking for:

 

http://www.generaltools.com/Departments/Hand-Tools/Screwdrivers/Ratchet-Offset-Screwdrivers.aspx

 

There probably are local distributors etc.

 

Good Luck.

 

 

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JMcS, that site you suggested gave me some ideas and it turns out I have an offset ratchet wrench and a screwdriver bit from another tool and now have exactly what I need.

 

I used to work on my car when I lived in the US and bought all kinds of tools; sometimes the tool would only be used once and now it looks like it will be used twice.

 

I got an e-mail from my local music store today and was told they will order the part for me. I should be back to normal in a week or two.

 

Thanks!

 

 

No guitarists were harmed during the making of this message.

 

In general, harmonic complexity is inversely proportional to the ratio between chording and non-chording instruments.

 

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