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Caevan O’Shite

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Hey, Bill, the next time someone sings-

 

"Haaave yew evah been-

 

____________havya evaben?-

 

______to E-lectric-La-dy-Laaand?"

 

- I see that you can reply, "Yess, yes I haaave!" :D:thu:

 

:cool:Cool avatar-pic there, hipster-traveler! http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v603/BillPark/electric%20ladyland/wallcrop.jpg

Ask yourself- What Would Ren and Stimpy Do?

 

~ Caevan James-Michael Miller-O'Shite ~

_ ___ _ Leprechaun, Esquire _ ___ _

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Thanks for noticing... and the Texas boys may recognize the "Kinky Freedman for Governor" shirt, which is about when that picture was taken.

 

Bill

"I believe that entertainment can aspire to be art, and can become art, but if you set out to make art you're an idiot."

 

Steve Martin

 

Show business: we're all here because we're not all there.

 

 

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Thanks for asking. All the doom and gloom that the doctors were hitting me with I've just rather ignored and continued to play. I'm not as great with left/right hand timing as I was, since the left ulnar nerve has been moved but not yet the right, so I have to concentrate a LOT. (When I type, I type a lot of fo ot ti instead of of to it, and I misspell words in the same way...)

 

The pain in the left little finger has either gone (like, maybe I played enough to kill the nerves)or I've gotten used to it. The 'hood' bone spur continues to grow over the joint and one day it will prevent me from playing with the little finger.

 

What is of some concern right now is the left knee is not 'coming back' as much as I would like after the operation, and two doctors have examined my right shoulder (which was operated on in Feb) and the left knee and said that I would not be able to go back to work. If I can't work I'll retire to that home that we're trying to buy in Florida.. which is all well and good...but I had not planned to retire quite yet, and I'll somehow have to make a living in the meantine.

 

But I am definitely still playing, and happy about it. It was quite painful for a time, and coupled with the doctors telling me that the degeneration is constant and unstoppable and will eventually take all of the cartilage in all of the fingers.. well, I was pretty bummed out for a while. Now I'm just keeping on keeping on, and I'm thinking, "Stop me if you can."

 

Bill

"I believe that entertainment can aspire to be art, and can become art, but if you set out to make art you're an idiot."

 

Steve Martin

 

Show business: we're all here because we're not all there.

 

 

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I was recently diagnosed with moderate Ulnar Neuropathy and Carpal Tunnel Syndrome. The whole time she was running through diagnosis, I was thinking about you and your affliction.

 

Mine is supposed to improve with less activity and the night time wearing of wrist splints. However, for now, I can sympathize with you regarding the pain and numbness. I'm so happy to hear that you are still playing. Hopefully, if you are careful, you'll be playing for years to come!

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I was recently diagnosed with moderate Ulnar Neuropathy and Carpal Tunnel Syndrome.

 

Mine is supposed to improve with less activity and the night time wearing of wrist splints.

 

Good luck with that. Many years ago I started to get carpal tunnel, and it was a simple matter of changing working ergonomics and habits (not that changing habits is EASY, but it is doable...) The ulnar thing is a little trickier, but again almost becomes a matter of changing habits. Not that I can reverse anything, and my left arm and hand that was supposedly 'fixed' still goes numb if I am not careful, but I was way, way deep into it. If you've managed to catch it early, good on ya, and learn from my mistakes!

 

I know that you probably think that they have given you all the answers. But there are things that you can do on your own to improve your situation. They've told you what is bad. Examine what you do and correct it. For most of us computer guys, it is the table height and angle at which we attack the keyboard or handle the mouse. Pro piano players learn at an early age to keep their wrists straight, and that is a big part of it. Changing the chair, the height of the chair, the closeness to the table, the table height, and all that other stuff can make your life a lot more comfortable. We tend to lean into the work and bend our wrists at acute angles, and all sorts of other bad-posture things that contribute to our pain, without even thinking about it.

 

So when you are working, take a moment to consider what you're doing physically and see if some simple changes might not be wise. It has helped me, and i was/am pretty well trashed anyway.

"I believe that entertainment can aspire to be art, and can become art, but if you set out to make art you're an idiot."

 

Steve Martin

 

Show business: we're all here because we're not all there.

 

 

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I was recently diagnosed with moderate Ulnar Neuropathy and Carpal Tunnel Syndrome.

 

Mine is supposed to improve with less activity and the night time wearing of wrist splints.

 

Good luck with that. Many years ago I started to get carpal tunnel, and it was a simple matter of changing working ergonomics and habits (not that changing habits is EASY, but it is doable...) The ulnar thing is a little trickier, but again almost becomes a matter of changing habits. Not that I can reverse anything, and my left arm and hand that was supposedly 'fixed' still goes numb if I am not careful, but I was way, way deep into it. If you've managed to catch it early, good on ya, and learn from my mistakes!

 

I know that you probably think that they have given you all the answers. But there are things that you can do on your own to improve your situation. They've told you what is bad. Examine what you do and correct it. For most of us computer guys, it is the table height and angle at which we attack the keyboard or handle the mouse. Pro piano players learn at an early age to keep their wrists straight, and that is a big part of it. Changing the chair, the height of the chair, the closeness to the table, the table height, and all that other stuff can make your life a lot more comfortable. We tend to lean into the work and bend our wrists at acute angles, and all sorts of other bad-posture things that contribute to our pain, without even thinking about it.

 

So when you are working, take a moment to consider what you're doing physically and see if some simple changes might not be wise. It has helped me, and i was/am pretty well trashed anyway.

 

Thanks for the advice Bill. I certainly will be going over my life's routines with a fine tooth comb and looking for areas where I can improve wrist position etc.

 

I'm trying to remember...Which surgery was it that they did on your hand? Was it for trigger finger?

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"I'm trying to remember...Which surgery was it that they did on your hand? Was it for trigger finger?"

 

When they moved the ulnar nerve they wanted to put a pin in my little finger and fuse the last joint. I told them "No". I got to surgery and they were all set to do that, too. Again I said "No", kicked up a big fuss, and made sure that everyone on the whole floor knew that I did not want a pin in my little finger nor fused joints. At that point I wanted no irreversible surprises.

 

The trigger finger thing I beat by changing the ergonomics of my work habits.

"I believe that entertainment can aspire to be art, and can become art, but if you set out to make art you're an idiot."

 

Steve Martin

 

Show business: we're all here because we're not all there.

 

 

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Noticed Caevan's gone acoustic and let loose of those P90's (cool picture)...hope all the best for Bill and Astring, been battling a few of those joint demons my bad self...kicked the trigger finger problem so far (knock on wood)...
Take care, Larryz
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"Noticed Caevan's gone acoustic ..."

 

and don't forget, he recognized the studio that I was in, by a small portion of one wall visible behind me.

"I believe that entertainment can aspire to be art, and can become art, but if you set out to make art you're an idiot."

 

Steve Martin

 

Show business: we're all here because we're not all there.

 

 

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I missed this entirely.

Whappened & why/how is moving the nerve involved ?

It seems to me moving a neve would involve stretching it...? :eek:

Why's the procedure result in "typing dyslexia" ?

Brief version's OK, I'm not tryna make ya reiterate too much.

d=halfnote
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Whappened & why/how is moving the nerve involved ?

It seems to me moving a neve would involve stretching it...? :eek:

Why's the procedure result in "typing dyslexia" ?

Brief version's OK, I'm not tryna make ya reiterate too much.

 

The ulnar nerve runs around the end of your elbow... it is the nerve that is affected when you 'hit your funny bone'. It controls the last three fingers on your hand.

 

Mine is somehow hung up, so it is being stretched when I bend my forearm. It is abrading (like a rope bent over a rock)and if it saws through, I'll lose the use of those three fingers, and they will eventually atrophy. This is happening in both arms. I had one corrected last year.

 

In the meantime, I have what they called 'slow' nerves in the arm. The time that it takes for a message to travel the length of the arm is a lot longer than it should be. One arm is a lot worse than the other. So messages given to the nerves aren't arriving at the destginations in the proper order because of the timing delays. That is causing the typing errors.

"I believe that entertainment can aspire to be art, and can become art, but if you set out to make art you're an idiot."

 

Steve Martin

 

Show business: we're all here because we're not all there.

 

 

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Sorry to hear that, Bill. Any idea what caused the ulnar nerve thing?

 

As a guitarist and workday computer-bound graphic designer (from a family of pianists with arthritis) I've always been very fearful of these problems. A lot of the people i work with, who've been long time journalists, data entry people, secretaries and typists, video editors, etc. have bad problems. That's kind of led to a more aware atmosphere in my workplace about ergonomics. The one thing that's bothering me is that I'm a tall guy, and the desks, chairs and leg spaces under the desks feel too small to me, and are starting to bother my knees.

 

I started having the carpal tunnel lockup claw for a bit when playing lengthy (4 hour) cover gigs, especially if I was switching to an acoustic a lot of that time. Looking into things I'd gotten into the habit of playing barre chords with my thumb pointing directly towards the headstock, which is a weak angle for the thumb joint and starts a little chain reaction in that potential bundle of trouble in that area. consciously fretting the chords with the thumb pointing straight up and putting pressure on the strings from fingers pulling back with the shoulder rather than pushing forward with the thumb solved that... Actually, did that recommendation come from one of you guys here?

 

I think that aspect of basing your technique in things to avoid problems from the get go should be pushed. I've known drummers and bassists who really did themselves some permanent damage with harmful habits. I've also met a couple of well-known guitar legends who have bad problems they have to deal with...

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"Any idea what caused the ulnar nerve thing?"

 

No but apparently it is not uncommon. The rule now is to try not to bend the arm more than 90 degrees. The hard part was learning how to sleep with my arms at my sides, not tucked under my chin.

 

About the desks.... I got a Herman Miller Areon chair, solved a LOT of those issues. I've always had the 'too tall' thing too, and when I first started to get carpal, I got real scared and changed how I worked. Where I didn't pay attention before, I just take simple precautions now.

 

I changed my guitar strap length. (used to be down to my knees... bad angle for the wrist.) I changed seating and working and sleeping positions. It really wasn't hard, nobody had to make a big deal about it, I just quietly made changes in my lifestyle and it has helped.

 

In terms of playing guitar and the thumb position, I used to like the boat necks, which forced me to put the thumb under the V and seemed to give me a better grip. But I don't play 'standard', in that at times my thumb is tucked into my palm (when playing high on the neck) and at times it is in the normal position or somewhere close, and at times it is wrapped over the top two strings (I play a 7th Aug 5th thing that used all six strings...) But what seems to be true is that, had we listened to put parents about proper posture, and listened to our instructors about proper posture, most of us wouldn't have the problems that we do.

 

(I don't know what i could have done to have prevented the nerve thing or the dissolving cartilage thing...)

 

 

"I believe that entertainment can aspire to be art, and can become art, but if you set out to make art you're an idiot."

 

Steve Martin

 

Show business: we're all here because we're not all there.

 

 

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