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Combo vs Head and Cab


BadLife

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I was looking at this

 

http://guitars.musiciansfriend.com/product/Vox-AC4TV-4W-Class-A-Guitar-Amp-Head?sku=620389

 

and thought I might get this to go with it

 

http://guitars.musiciansfriend.com/product/Vox-V112TV-1X12-Guitar-Speaker-Cabinet?sku=620390

 

but the only review seemed to think the fact that it is made out of particle board instead of birch plywood was a real bad thing. I have the Valve jr cab he was talking about and it sounds OK. I never even looked to see what it is made out of. I know that some cabs are made from different plywood although I don't think any are made from solid wood although I could be misinformed about that.

 

Any thoughts on this???

 

I was also interested in this

 

http://guitars.musiciansfriend.com/product/Vox-AC4TV-4W-1x10-Tube-Guitar-Combo-Amp?sku=476326

 

but am not sure about that 10" speaker and it's supposed to be made out of particle board also. Any thoughts on the 10" combo as opposed to the head and 12" speaker cab?

 

I got plenty of amps but this has a built-in power attenuator, with 4-watt, 1-watt and 1/4-watt output levels and that 1/4 watt level intrigues me for some reason. Any one played one yet? If so did you get to try all the settings? I know there was another thread about this but no one seemed to have any experience with the thing at the time.

 

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Particle board is stable and heavy, but fragile, it just doesn't take hard knocks. Birch plywood is stronger, and if you plan on moving the cab around from gig to gig, you'll be glad eventually that you got birch ply.

Always remember that you are unique. Just like everyone else.

 

 

 

 

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Every course I took about cabinet making was concerned with rigidity. You want the resonant frequency of the material to be lower than the lowest note your instrument will produce.

 

Particle board will have a lower resonant frequency than a piece of lumber with similar dimensions.

 

And a surprising number of cabinets are made from particle board, or some lumber framework with a particle board component.

 

If I was building a cab, I'd probably use Baltic birch because it is cheap, and because it can hold a screw, because it is going to last longer, and because the difference in cost to me is going to be negligible over time. The typical company building thousands of cabinets will see significant savings if they can save $1 a cabinet. If I'm building my own, I don't care if it costs me $20 more to get what I want, I'm only building one or two, and the fact that I am building it myself means that I can't buy what I want.... because it is certainly not going to save much to build it myself even if I consider my time to be free. (Which I don't. I can earn the money to buy a cabinet a lot more easily than I can build a similarly-crafted cabinet.)

 

Though I would still use framing for durability, it would not have to be as substantial as the framing I would need to assemble a particle board cabinet. I could rabbet and glue some joints without worrying about framing. And generally speaking, I prefer working with wood over working with composites in a shop.

 

But there is nothing wrong with using particle board for a speaker cabinet. One assumes there will be a need for paint or some covering, so the material will be protected from the elements, no matter what material is used.

"I believe that entertainment can aspire to be art, and can become art, but if you set out to make art you're an idiot."

 

Steve Martin

 

Show business: we're all here because we're not all there.

 

 

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Hope this isn't a breach of etiquette but I changed the Title of the main post as I am now more interested in comments (if any) on the Combo vs the Head and Cab version of this amp. Any one have any thoughts or comments on the difference between the two set ups? What about the difference between the 10" and 12" speakers? I have 2 10s in my Fender Vibrolux Reverb and the sound OK but that amp tends to be a little trebley for my taste. Of course all the Fender amps I have used seem that way to me.
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I like two 12's and most tube type combos with two 12's are too heavy (ie. 60lbs)...so I'm looking at a piggy back where the amp weighs 35 and the speakers weigh 35...I can make two trips or decide to carry both in at the same time...I've carried two 35lb speakers at the same time balanced load on each side that felt better than carrying my 55lb amp....soundwise the twin reverb is my favorite but 60lb combos are just too heavy...I may even find a lighter amp head and 40 watts is all I need...will be having a GAS attack soon...
Take care, Larryz
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Most small watt combos are gonna have smaller speaker.The difference as you mentioned would be added highs.I think the reason is how it drives the speaker.Head and cab would be a personal preference.I'd go with a combo if it's that small just me though.I think the stack set-up is like a novelty just like this low watt amp craze.There's more value to be had in the 15 to 20 watt arena just me again. :cool:
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I can't speak directly to the Vox setup, but I'm currently in a bit of GAS for a Blackheart head and speaker cab. In this case, all the amps are heads (available at the dealer in question) and there are several cabs available. They paired the 1 watt and 5w/3w with a 10" cab and the 15w/7w with a single 12" cab. (Although the pieces are sold separately.) I opted to audition the 5w/3w through the 12" cab and the sound difference was immediately obvious. I would only buy the 12" cab because I wanted the bass response unavailable in the 10" cab.

 

I didn't have an opportunity to try their combo version with the 12" and an open back cab. I daresay I'd rather have the closed back, personally.

It's easiest to find me on Facebook. Neil Bergman

 

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open back combo for me. i have a small 17 watt mesa/boogie studio caliber and it is loud enough for me. I can always get a heavier sound than my buddy who uses head/cab. the open back gives it more presence to me.
Why do you lay down? I say that it beats standing up! whats got you feeling so down? I hold up my empty cup!
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Well they just got them in at GC and the combo is closed back. They also have a closed back version that has 4 watt, 1 watt and 1/10 watt and an 8" speaker for $199.

 

I guess with such low power, they're not too concerned about heat.... :rolleyes:

Never a DUH! moment! Well, almost never. OK, OK! Sometimes never!
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I only run 60watts with two 6L6 power tubes and it feels good to know the open back is letting heat out...any 100watt tuber should have an open back on the combos as they're probably getting pretty warm especially if running four 6L6's...but who knows maybe some amp makers like the heat build up? I see a lot of piggy back amps with the head fully open and tubes a glow'en...hope noone spills a drink on one of them... :idea:
Take care, Larryz
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I had a little battery powered Fender amp, one of the plastic things they made back in the 80's, that a friend of mine put a 1/4" jack that interrupted the speaker so it could be hooked up to an external cab. Hooked up to a 4x12, that sucker smoked!

These days, I'd like to find a 10-15 watt tube amp that I could use to push a 2 or 4x12. That way, I could get more than enough volume(level/sound pressure/etc) and still be pushing the power tubes hard enough for them to distort instead of using pre-amp distortion. I don't need 100 watts for the gigs I play.

Always remember that you are unique. Just like everyone else.

 

 

 

 

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I finally had a chance to try out both of these amps at GC. The 4 watt, 1 watt, 1/4 watt at 1/4 watt and full volume with the tone all the way to treble sounded really good. With the tone set at middle not bad and OK with it all the way to bass. I liked it best with the tone control set to the treble setting. It was not too loud although it was not screaming loud it would be OK for practice or recording. I tried the 1 Watt setting with everything up and it was more of the same only quite a bit louder. I did not see any point at blasting it at 4 watts as that setting was quite loud at the half way point.

 

The 4 watt, 1 watt, 1/10 watt was also tried at full volume on the 1/10 watt setting. It was OK and actually sounded better when it was not all the way up. The volume level at 1/10 watt was quite enough that you should be able to use it at the level any where you could play an acoustic.

 

I liked the 4 watt, 1 watt, 1/4 watt amp better possibly because of the 8" speaker. I did have have a chance to plug either of them into a 4x12 or any other extension cab, but from what I have seen with other small wattage amps they would only sound better. I may get the 4 watt, 1 watt, 1/4 watt at some time.

 

They also had the American Standard Fender guitars at the $998 price point and had both a 3 tone sunburst Stratocaster and the same thing in a Telecaster. :eek:

 

I almost bought both of them, but was able to walk away. :freak:

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