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Origin of "Combinations"


Synthoid

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Call them Setups, Performances, Combis... whatever; I was wondering--what was the first keyboard to incorporate this feature?

 

I'm not referring to a keyboard that can just do splits and layers, but one that actually has buttons on the front panel to switch between "programs & combinations."

 

Someone told me it was the M1, but I'm just checkin'.

 

 

When an eel hits your eye like a big pizza pie, that's a Moray.
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In my failing memory, the Korg M1 was first one I had that combined patches like that - my buddy's D50 used four layers but it wasn't quite the same UI transparency as taking existing patches to layer into combis. But like I said, my memory is foggy and I haven't touched either an M1 or D50 in years. I mostly remember sequencing an entire church Christmas program on the M1's internal sequencer. At the time I thought it sounded incredible. Yikes.
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I believe your buddy is right. I bought a D550 and an M1re in 1989 (along with a Roland MKS20 and A80 controller), and the M1re was the first keyboard/module I knew that had a combi/performance button.
Hitting "Play" does NOT constitute live performance. -Me.
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Not really what we think of as the modern combi, but the Roland Jupiter 8 and 6 used this concept as far as having "patches" that you could save, and "presets" that were combinations of patches - either a patch with different keyboard settings, or a split... it didn't do layers.

 

It has a Patch/Preset button to change the mode.

Dan

 

Acoustic/Electric stringed instruments ranging from 4 to 230 strings, hammered, picked, fingered, slapped, and plucked. Analog and Digital Electronic instruments, reeds, and throat/mouth.

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Not really what we think of as the modern combi, but the Roland Jupiter 8 and 6 used this concept as far as having "patches" that you could save, and "presets" that were combinations of patches - either a patch with different keyboard settings, or a split...

 

My Ensoniq ESQ-1 did that as well--you could save layered or split programs together with regular programs. There was no separate mode button for that though.

When an eel hits your eye like a big pizza pie, that's a Moray.
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At times I still use the PRESETS on my HaMMond B3. They can be altered too.

 

"The music business is a cruel and shallow money trench; a long plastic hallway where thieves and pimps run free, and good men die like dogs. ............ There's also a negative side"

 

 

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At times I still use the PRESETS on my HaMMond B3. They can be altered too.

 

Not what the OP was looking for; he's talking about multitimbral combinations with a dedicated mode to select between them. The B3 presets are akin to patch mode on a synthesizer.

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At times I still use the PRESETS on my HaMMond B3. They can be altered too.

 

Not what the OP was looking for; he's talking about multitimbral combinations with a dedicated mode to select between them.

 

Thank you! :thu:

When an eel hits your eye like a big pizza pie, that's a Moray.
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Not what the OP was looking for; he's talking about multitimbral combinations with a dedicated mode to select between them.

 

Thank you! :thu:

 

My pleasure. :)

 

I've been thinking about it, and I was in music retail at the time of the M1 release, and I can't think of another synth before it that offered what we're discussing. It's possible but not likely that there was some boutique synth that had it, but I can't think of one off the top of my head. :cool:

 

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"The B3 presets are akin to patch mode on a synthesizer."

 

Very much so since they involved moving wires around on what amounted to a patch panel.

 

 

Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, it is time to pause and reflect.

-Mark Twain

 

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Thinking of the early analog polys, the Matrix-12 was probably the first one with its "Multis". The Voyetra Eight probably had a similar feature, but I'm not sure. The Chroma was multitimbral only when attached to a computer; otherwise it just had the usual splits and layers (very elegantly implemented, I have to say).

Of the popular digital romplers, the M1 was certainly the first *usable* one - although it could have been preceded, cronologically, by things like the Sequential Multitrack and Split Eight, which weren't very successful.

 

 

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That timeline table is very interesting, to check one's memory if nothing else. Just two years after the M1, the SY77 and Wavestation came out. And one year after that it was the K2000's turn already!

 

 

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While it wasn't in the realm of the typical user, The Fairlight was actually probably the one. And we can all thank Peter Gabriel for being so involved in the pioneering stages of that; while he wasn't a big "face" associated with the Fairlight like Herbie and others, Peter was talking about putting that kind of "music making power" in the everyday musician's hands. He may have been a $$$$ contributor as well as a beta guy.
Hitting "Play" does NOT constitute live performance. -Me.
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That timeline table is very interesting, to check one's memory if nothing else. Just two years after the M1, the SY77 and Wavestation came out. And one year after that it was the K2000's turn already!

 

 

Right. And if you click on the board names, you get pics and history along with features. Its pretty useful for historical info on synths.

There are 10 kinds of people in the world...those who can read binary, and those who can't.
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Thinking of the early analog polys, the Matrix-12 was probably the first one with its "Multis".

I think you may be right... :idea:

 

dB

 

Wasn´t the Xpander the 1st release and before the Matrix-12 ?

If yes, the Xpander was the 1st one using "combinations" in a multitimbral way.

I own one and love it ´til today.

 

A.C.

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Wasn´t the Xpander the 1st release and before the Matrix-12 ?

If yes, the Xpander was the 1st one using "combinations" in a multitimbral way.

I own one and love it ´til today.

 

A.C.

Al, you're absolutely right! And thinking of the fact that I've owned one for a couple of years before getting the Matrix-12... I'm definitely getting older. :)

 

 

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Call them Setups, Performances, Combis... whatever; I was wondering--what was the first keyboard to incorporate this feature?

 

I'm not referring to a keyboard that can just do splits and layers, but one that actually has buttons on the front panel to switch between "programs & combinations."

 

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/6/69/Pipe.organ.console.arp.jpg/225px-Pipe.organ.console.arp.jpg

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/7/7f/Usnaconsole.jpg/225px-Usnaconsole.jpg

 

Couplers (Swell to Great, for example), user programmable Presets ... you got your buttons, your foot pistons. :)

 

 

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In general, harmonic complexity is inversely proportional to the ratio between chording and non-chording instruments.

 

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Wasn´t the Xpander the 1st release and before the Matrix-12 ?

If yes, the Xpander was the 1st one using "combinations" in a multitimbral way.

Al, you're absolutely right!

I always forget that thing exists. It's like the K250 or Chroma expanders.....big ol' thing with no keys....weird... :freak:

 

dB

:snax:

 

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http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/6/69/Pipe.organ.console.arp.jpg/225px-Pipe.organ.console.arp.jpg

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/7/7f/Usnaconsole.jpg/225px-Usnaconsole.jpg

 

But does it have a sequencer? :rimshot:

When an eel hits your eye like a big pizza pie, that's a Moray.
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But does it have a sequencer?

 

The recently built ones have a sequencer (either built in or available as an accessory), and full MIDI hookup.

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That timeline table is very interesting, to check one's memory if nothing else. Just two years after the M1, the SY77 and Wavestation came out. And one year after that it was the K2000's turn already!

 

 

That was a great period. :thu: I had chicks, money, hair and a K2000. :laugh:

 

Of all the gear I've had over the past 30 years, nothing could compare with buying a loaded K2000, that really kicked ass. It's all been downhill since. :mad:

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The Korg M1 had a "Combi" button which was the first use where you could layer and split different PROGRAMS (or Voices) separate from the individual program mode....

Yamaha (Motif XS7, Motif 6, TX81Z), Korg (R3, Triton-R), Roland (XP-30, D-50, Juno 6, P-330). Novation A Station, Arturia Analog Experience Factory 32

 

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