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KB Players Beyond Their Years


ProfD

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Lately, I've been checking out a few live performances.

 

Some of these young KB players are playing tastefully. The pretty chords, fills and overall pocket presence are there.

 

I feel like an old vet sitting out in the audience smiling and nodding in approval as these 'kids' drop slick tritone subs en route to resolution.

 

Of course, I'm soaking up stuff the average listener could give a sh*t less about as evidenced by their pre-occupation with chicken fingers and shaved ice. :laugh:

 

This isn't about a particular player moreso than an appreciation for the fact that despite budget cuts in arts education, there are folks who are still learning and know how to play music.

 

The other thing is, these folks are so talented, they can make any Triton *cough* ROMpler sound good. :):cool:

PD

 

"The greatest thing you'll ever learn, is just to love and be loved in return."--E. Ahbez "Nature Boy"

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Yep, churches are THE breeding ground for these young lions showing up in music stores and/or on tours around the country on a feeding frenzy. :laugh:

 

A formal music education focuses on the nuts and bolts i.e. theory. Church shed sessions encompass everything where musos dive straight into songs and jams.

 

As a result, these cats are learning blues, jazz, gospel, funk, etc., concurrently. Since those are the building blocks of most music, they can easily pull off most secular gigs.

 

Hardest part is learning how to read music, playing in different keys and with restraint. Once seasoned, they are off to the races. ;):cool:

PD

 

"The greatest thing you'll ever learn, is just to love and be loved in return."--E. Ahbez "Nature Boy"

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It was humbling, that day I was in Chuck Levin's and some teenager says "I need help with my organ pedaling", and proceeds to play like Jimmy Smith, under the watchful eyes of older church/gospel organ players in the room. Ok, I'm exaggerating a little bit, but he was no beginner, and already out of my league...
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It was humbling, that day I was in Chuck Levin's and some teenager says "I need help with my organ pedaling", and proceeds to play like Jimmy Smith, under the watchful eyes of older church/gospel organ players in the room. Ok, I'm exaggerating a little bit, but he was no beginner, and already out of my league...

Just keep it in perspective. Those cats are spending more than 10k hours not just practicing but shedding with each other and exchanging chops. Very much the way jazz musos did in the past.

 

Between practice and performance situations, gospel musos play and have their ass*s kicked on a regular basis moreso than any other muso IMO.

 

That is why so many of them easily transition to other gigs and play well beyond their years i.e. battle scars.

 

While I don't have the mindset to be a gospel muso, many of friends believe I will come back to that side at some point. :laugh::cool:

PD

 

"The greatest thing you'll ever learn, is just to love and be loved in return."--E. Ahbez "Nature Boy"

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Pretty much every keyboard player I hear - I'm always humbled.

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Good topic!

 

Recently I visited a music fair. Upon entering one of the exhibit rooms I heard someone doing some really advanced jazz stuff on piano. As any keyboard player would do, I went to see who it was, and to hear a bit of that imho really good playing.

 

You should've seen the look on my place when I saw it was a 17 year old guy. He had really good chops, and I was really, really impressed and a bit depressed since he was already playing way better than I can (and I'm 10 years older). Ok, jazz is not my genre, but still. We had a good chat, and did some jamming together. It's incredible how some guys can develop so early, that guy could easily do jazz concerts next to far older cats.

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Even worse, I heard an old tape of my band back in my high school days and could not believe it was actually me playing keys. I played better when I could shed all day and not worry about mortgages, taxes, kids, etc...

 

Hearing it felt good and bad at the same time.

Goal: Get back to my playing skills of 30 years ago?

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Because these enthusiastic and talented young folks do exist, I'm optimistic that they will continue to play, compose, record and perform quality music with a viable outlet in terms of industry.

 

Retirement seems to be the time when older musos can shed all day. Hopefully I don't have to wait that long to get my chops back. :laugh::cool:

PD

 

"The greatest thing you'll ever learn, is just to love and be loved in return."--E. Ahbez "Nature Boy"

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Even worse, I heard an old tape of my band back in my high school days and could not believe it was actually me playing keys. I played better when I could shed all day and not worry about mortgages, taxes, kids, etc...

 

Hearing it felt good and bad at the same time.

Goal: Get back to my playing skills of 30 years ago?

 

Yep. That's me. My playing went to crap when I stopped practicing classical every day and started playing rock/pop in cover bands.

This post edited for speling.
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In my area it is the young gospel musicians that have the best support and mentoring. You can join a church band at any level, practice with a band, play in public, and receive instruction from talented and experieced musicians. Bar bands tend to always look for the best musicians to maximize jobs and pay. In small town small church bands you frequently find a couple of really good musicians that consider it their duty to help develop talent.
This post edited for speling.
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