Jump to content


Please note: You can easily log in to MPN using your Facebook account!

I've quit the band!


stepay

Recommended Posts

About a year after I joined my latest venture, I've quit.

 

So, on to our first gig with a new bass player (Friday night). We're about to play Superstition and the leader says to me, "don't play clav on this -- just hold some organ notes". Um...ok. Then later we played Bill Withers' Use Me. I got the same request. No clav on that song is sacrilege. Then we do Standing on Shaky Ground, and the audience is really into it, and some dude comes up to me after the song and said he LOVED the horns I threw in the song. Well, during the break the band leader tells me that in the future he'd like me to just play some organ. What?!

Steve (Stevie Ray)

"Do the chickens have large talons?"

Link to comment
Share on other sites



  • Replies 59
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Better to quit then to let them have a chance at firing you. Which sounds like they might have been leaning towards running you off anyways.

 

I hate when the "bandleader" tells me what to play or not play.

 

I recently disbanded when they replaced the drummer. I'm dreading joining another band, or starting my own, such a time sink.

-Greg

Motif XS8, MOXF8, Hammond XK1c, Vent

Rhodes Mark II 88 suitcase, Yamaha P255

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Another unfortunate situation that comes with 'bands'.

 

Sounds like you jumped off shaky ground before the fault erupted.

 

However, you should not totally give up on playing live. See my new thread. ;):cool:

PD

 

"The greatest thing you'll ever learn, is just to love and be loved in return."--E. Ahbez "Nature Boy"

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Better to quit then to let them have a chance at firing you. Which sounds like they might have been leaning towards running you off anyways.

 

I hate when the "bandleader" tells me what to play or not play.

 

I recently disbanded when they replaced the drummer. I'm dreading joining another band, or starting my own, such a time sink.

 

The bass player got some of the funk back into the music, but the minute he was gone, the leader wanted no clav, no horns, nothing funky or cool. Weird to me. His band, so he can do what he wants, but as a keyboard player, it just made it next to no fun just playing and holding "organ notes".

 

Steve (Stevie Ray)

"Do the chickens have large talons?"

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Another unfortunate situation that comes with 'bands'.

 

Sounds like you jumped off shaky ground before the fault erupted.

 

However, you should not totally give up on playing live. See my new thread. ;):cool:

 

If I get the itch to play I can always sit in with other bands I know in town or go to a blues jam or something. This last band was supposed to be casual and fun. Ended up not that way at all.

 

I have a hard time imagining ever playing in a band again.

Steve (Stevie Ray)

"Do the chickens have large talons?"

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I just hung up a band a few weeks ago. We've been trying to get off the ground for 18 months despite turnover due to lack of skill (our original bass player was horrible) or circumstances beyond a member's control (new bass player got a new job and had to move away). I was also getting frustrated at the guitar player brushing off my song suggestions and dominating the song selection process, not to mention he was an old dog and stuck on his guitar technique which was less than sufficient (hopelessly stuck in the metal 80s and he'd use a high gain sound for Sweet Home Alabama).

 

Scheduling was a problem, we could only practice on sunday early afternoon. I sacrificed many weekends to accomodate. In the end I decided the sacrifice wasn't worth it, summer was here and I wanted time to do things on weekends.

 

I haven't given up live playing. I'm new in town and am learning the musicians. Where I came from, the good musicians knew each other and there was a lot of mutual respect. Here there are too many slackers. I'm too old to hold hands and I don't need the grief of personality conflicts.

 

I may check out the open jams.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have a hard time imagining ever playing in a band again.

Well, you felt the same way when the last band dissolved. ;)

 

While the caliber of musicianship has some bearing, it really doesn't determine the overall effectiveness of a band.

 

Many successful bands are a combination of talent and skill.

 

I have heard incredible bands with average musos. OTOH, I've heard world class musos miss cues and make mistakes. Doesn't matter.

 

Most 'bands' start with a commitment to make good music. Some are put together as a means to an end i.e. get paid.

 

Either way, human nature has a way of bringing BS into the mix. Keeping that factor out takes hard work and energy.

 

You have been a muso for 20 years. For fun or livelihood, it is a part of your spirit.

 

You will find a better situation. Hang tight. :cool:

PD

 

"The greatest thing you'll ever learn, is just to love and be loved in return."--E. Ahbez "Nature Boy"

Link to comment
Share on other sites

We're about to play Superstition and the leader says to me, "don't play clav on this -- just hold some organ notes". Um...ok. Major suckage followed. Then later we played Bill Withers' Use Me. I got the same request. No clav on that song is sacrilege.
:o

 

Killin' the clav on those two songs is insane (unless you've rearranged them so they're almost completely different than the original).

 

See ProfD's other thread, and go find a gig that's fun, or sit in. I know you want to play, Steve. You can find something that works for you, or make it happen yourself.

"I'm so crazy, I don't know this is impossible! Hoo hoo!" - Daffy Duck

 

"The good news is that once you start piano you never have to worry about getting laid again. More time to practice!" - MOI

Link to comment
Share on other sites

As some here might remember, I went through my own bit of "band pain" myself not so long ago with a Level 42 tribute band.

 

Generally, these things work out for the best, Steve - I checked their website today and the one piece of audio they have on is awful (as is the whole website, speaking with my other professional hat on) - the song is played too fast, the main vocal is flat and the signature synth line that dominates the original song is a confused noise within.

 

These days, I'll only work with people I like and they mostly work for me. I send them a set list, they turn up, we play, I pay them. Boom. And most nights, we sound far better than those bands which spend hours "practising" in dank rehearsal studios somewhere in a dangerous part of town!

Studio: Yamaha P515 | Yamaha Tyros 5 | Yamaha HX1 | Moog Sub 37

Road: Yamaha YC88 | Nord Electro 5D

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm actually not sure I want to play. ProfD brought up that I felt the same way when my last band dissolved, and that's true, but the only reason I went into this band was because my former bass player brought me in, and then he left (followed by another bass player who left). I think this last experience has solidified it for me. I really did not like going to bed at 3 a.m. Saturday morning.

Steve (Stevie Ray)

"Do the chickens have large talons?"

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I hate when the "bandleader" tells me what to play or not play.

 

The only thing worse is when the drummer tells you what to play or not to play.

Stan

Gig Rig: Yamaha S90 XS; Hammond SK-1; Rehearsal: Yamaha MOX8 Korg Triton Le61, Yamaha S90, Hammond XK-1

Retired: Hammond M2/Leslie 145, Wurly 200, Ensoniq VFX

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I love playing in bands. That having been said, I might not ever formally join a band again in my life. All the things stepay describes are all too common, and like he says: life is too short for miserable musical experiences.

 

Still, the thrill of jamming with good musicians is too much a pleasure to write off permanently. I just have no intention of putting together a gigging band again, and I can tell you right now, I am done, done, done playing covers, hopefully for the rest of my life, unless it's a one-time screwing-around session for fun. I never, ever want an actual gig as a cover band again. Bleh.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

. . . (though SRV did a passable version of Superstition without the clav). . .

 

This brings up a good point. Is it possible, even in the furthest reach of imagination, that this bandleader's unreasonable request was an effort to bring forth a sound in his head that was just as good or maybe even better than Stevie Wonder's or SRV's version? If memory serves, SRV's version had a lot of heavy B3. Maybe he wanted to cover that version rather than the original. Point being many well known songs are covered to the letter while others take on another approach - some every bit as good or maybe even better than the original. Just a few examples might be Joe Cocker's Help from my Friends; Mellencamp's Wild Nights, Van Halen's You're No good etc. Whadya think?

Stan

Gig Rig: Yamaha S90 XS; Hammond SK-1; Rehearsal: Yamaha MOX8 Korg Triton Le61, Yamaha S90, Hammond XK-1

Retired: Hammond M2/Leslie 145, Wurly 200, Ensoniq VFX

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I went through much the same thing as you Stepay. Years ago I quit a good paying job, bought a major rig, moved to the city and found myself replacing a keyboardist in one of the best cover bands in the city. Things went great for a few weeks, then the band leader started. "Keep both hands on the keys. Stop using those spacy sounds. Play block chords." He was stuck in the 60's mentality but trying to play popular music. It finally reached a boiling point between sets of a gig and I told him to start looking for another keyboardist. I started playing how I wanted to play and a few weeks later the leader came back and talked to me about how great I was playing. We played together until that band broke up and he never again tried to tell me how to play.

 

It sounds like what you need in a band is what I have also been considering. A seasonal band. It works very well for my cousin's gospel band. They start practicing in late spring, play summer festivals, and stop playing when fall arrives. They have done it 10-15 years and really enjoy it.

This post edited for speling.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I love the B3 too, but some clav and some horns and some piano and some EP and some other organs and on and on sure keep the songs all fresh and not all sounding like each other.

Steve (Stevie Ray)

"Do the chickens have large talons?"

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I love playing in bands. That having been said, I might not ever formally join a band again in my life. All the things stepay describes are all too common, and like he says: life is too short for miserable musical experiences.

 

Still, the thrill of jamming with good musicians is too much a pleasure to write off permanently. I just have no intention of putting together a gigging band again, and I can tell you right now, I am done, done, done playing covers, hopefully for the rest of my life, unless it's a one-time screwing-around session for fun. I never, ever want an actual gig as a cover band again. Bleh.

 

I agree...this is all too common in bands. I have no interest in joining one again. Blues jams perhaps. Or I'll get together with some of my musician friends and jam a bit, but I'm done with bands. MAYBE if I started my own band, but even there, when you have to rely on others who don't always come through, that can be frustrating too.

Steve (Stevie Ray)

"Do the chickens have large talons?"

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yes I was merely giving him the benefit of the doubt with the information given. There's more going on here than possible to reveal in a post. The other point that I thought about was your statement from the first post "The bass player also had a "practice on your own" attitude rather than a "lets get together to practice" attitude, and I liked his way." No need to defend your position any further, but I did wonder if the leader have the opportunity to present this or other arrangements at rehearsals.

Stan

Gig Rig: Yamaha S90 XS; Hammond SK-1; Rehearsal: Yamaha MOX8 Korg Triton Le61, Yamaha S90, Hammond XK-1

Retired: Hammond M2/Leslie 145, Wurly 200, Ensoniq VFX

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Things went great for a few weeks, then the band leader started. "Keep both hands on the keys. Stop using those spacy sounds. Play block chords."
Now THATS funny... I've never experienced anything like that before. I definitely would of told him I was done after that gig. What nerve, and ignorance

 

I cant stand the guitar player mentality and approach to anything band related... I find myself hiding that fact

-Greg

Motif XS8, MOXF8, Hammond XK1c, Vent

Rhodes Mark II 88 suitcase, Yamaha P255

Link to comment
Share on other sites

MAYBE if I started my own band, but even there, when you have to rely on others who don't always come through, that can be frustrating too.

This the best course of action to take and it doesn't have to be frustrating.

 

You already know the local talented musos with whom you would want to work.

 

Also, you have an idea of what a muso is willing to deal with or not.

 

Give your first call musos a copy of your song list. Book paying gigs.

 

Call ONE rehearsal if necessary to go over the tunes.

 

Do the gig and get paid. Rinse and repeat. :cool:

PD

 

"The greatest thing you'll ever learn, is just to love and be loved in return."--E. Ahbez "Nature Boy"

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've not that much to add but these ideas may be important:

(1) Playing in ensembles should be both fun &, at least sometimes, real work.

(2) Bands should always view their goal as either development of the players or earning money (preferably both); otherwise they tend to drift into endless practices...in fact I suggest abandoning the term "practice" for "rehearsal", so as to create a certain mind-set.

(3) Whenever possible be the worst player in the band... :eek:...so that you work with musicians who play better than you.

(4) While I know you were joking about drummers, the drummer should be, when possible, the best player in the band because he does the most to back up the other players & control the dynamics.

(5) As soon as possible after formation groups not lead by a particular individual should develop a charter for their operation covering any eventuality that members forsee, both within the band & with outside. Should they become real money-making entities, they should mutually contract each other.

That ends such ad hoc snafus.

d=halfnote
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Where'd the Bass Player go? Any chance you could hook up with him? Guitar players are usually pretty easy to find, and you can always try a number of fill-in drummers until one clicks. Why not take the bull by the horns and be the next band leader?

Dan

 

Acoustic/Electric stringed instruments ranging from 4 to 230 strings, hammered, picked, fingered, slapped, and plucked. Analog and Digital Electronic instruments, reeds, and throat/mouth.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

the drummer should be, when possible, the best player in the band because he does the most to back up the other players & control the dynamics

 

Agreed. Everybody can know their parts. But if the drummer can't lay down a tight groove that everyone can follow, you have no foundation; everything falls apart.

 

...been there.

 

 

"Music expresses that which cannot be put into words and that which cannot remain silent." - Victor Hugo
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I love playing in bands. That having been said, I might not ever formally join a band again in my life. All the things stepay describes are all too common, and like he says: life is too short for miserable musical experiences.

 

Still, the thrill of jamming with good musicians is too much a pleasure to write off permanently. I just have no intention of putting together a gigging band again, and I can tell you right now, I am done, done, done playing covers, hopefully for the rest of my life, unless it's a one-time screwing-around session for fun. I never, ever want an actual gig as a cover band again. Bleh.

So what do you do? Hired gun?

 

---

 

When I had a band, my attitude was that each player was the expert at their own instrument. While I might make a suggestion or ask them to try things out, in the end, I treated them like how I wanted to be treated, as the authority of whatever they did.

"I'm so crazy, I don't know this is impossible! Hoo hoo!" - Daffy Duck

 

"The good news is that once you start piano you never have to worry about getting laid again. More time to practice!" - MOI

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Where'd the Bass Player go? Any chance you could hook up with him? Guitar players are usually pretty easy to find, and you can always try a number of fill-in drummers until one clicks. Why not take the bull by the horns and be the next band leader?

 

The bass player who left is in two other bands, and I have a standing invitation to join him in either. I appreciate all the tips on how to get going with another band, but honestly, I'm not really wanting that right now. I think I'll play at home for fun, maybe try to get better at guitar, and just do blues jams now and then if I get the urge to play with others.

Steve (Stevie Ray)

"Do the chickens have large talons?"

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Stepay, sounds like that bandleader suffers from LSD, Lead Singer Disease. He fired your bass player maybe because he was taking the spotlight away too often. As for the clav, maybe he didn't like your clav sound, but I would bet he was just a control freak and was threatened by your superior musical knowledge and skills and felt this was a way of bringing you down.

 

Personally, I could deal with a Musical Director or artist asking me to try a different sound, or play something differently, as long as I have respect for the person as a musician or artist. If you don't respect the musician's opinions then naturally you're going to say to yourself "What the fuck do they know about music." When you're subbing, or a hired sideman it's easier to swallow your pride and do as your told. When you're part of a casual band it should remain mutually respectful.

 

Either way, don't let it bring you down man! There's plenty of bands and musos out there. Some guys are assholes, some guys are ego-maniacs, some are super humble, some are cool, some are collaborative and others are hypocritical back stabbers who'll replace a band member without even giving a phone call and being honest. Just find a band you could get along with, respect musically and enjoy working with.

Ian Benhamou

Keyboards/Guitar/Vocals

 

[url:https://www.facebook.com/OfficialTheMusicalBox/]The Musical Box[/url]

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...