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Pair of 2x10"s Stacked or Fanned?


TimR

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At last nights gig we played in an excellent hall. Very spacious and excellent acoustics. When we sound checked I used my 10m lead to go out front. As I moved around the hall I really noticed the beaming effect of the bass. There was a very narrow angle probably no more than 20 Degrees either side of the cabinet that you could hear the definition of the bass. The bass was loud enough everywhere else, just not that defined.

 

Later on I noticed that most people had gravitated over to my side of the stage, hopefully because they wanted to hear my killer licks ;)

 

Current wisdom is to have a pair of 2x10s stacked vertically, but has anyone experimented with fanning out two 2x10 cabinets so that the dispersion angle is better and have they then noticed any big phasing/combing problems with the bass frequencies.

Feel the groove internally within your own creativity. - fingertalkin

 

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The higher the frequency, the more beaming you get. Low frequencies are omni-directional and don't "beam". Hence the difference in "definition" you heard as you moved around the room.

I had an old 410 guitar cab with an angled front (about 15 or 20 degrees left and right). I loved it for skinny-string guitar and used it for bass guitar for a while and didn't notice any phasing/comb or other problems (other than it not being designed for bass).

Placing your 2 cabs side-by-side will change the coupling and therefore the sound, even without angling them. Experiment during sound check the next time you work that room and see what sounds good to you.

 

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Yeah, high & low frequencies behave quite differently, fanning the cabinets will provide a wider dispersion for high frequencies, but the lobing & coupling of low frequencies will usually be much less predictable (and rarely very uniform). Note that there probably *is* a particular side-by-side arrangement of your two cabinets that will yield a well-coupled, symmetrical polar dispersion at low frequencies, but it will be very difficult to determine empirically and it almost certainly won't be conducive to small stages. Stacking eliminates a lot of the guesswork, and usually results in the best compromise.
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I presently only own 1 2x10" and was only wondering whether the fan approach would work better for dispersion. Getting a second 2x10" just to be louder is not my agenda.

 

I have had another thought though that is probably pretty obvious. I usually try to get my amp back flat against the back wall. As I am off to the side of the stage, the sound is mainly projected to that side of the dance floor. Next gig I will try to angle it slightly more towards the centre of the dance floor.

 

A little experimentation... Watch this space.

Feel the groove internally within your own creativity. - fingertalkin

 

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Stick a solid round thing on the grill directly in front of the dust cap.

 

There's a name for this, but I've forgotten it.

 

I'm sure someone will provide...........

 

:)

 

G.

"When the power of love overcomes the love of power the World will know Peace": Jimi Hendrix

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The Geoff - blame Caevan!!!

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Buy my Acme B2 4ohms... Thanks :D

 

Now seriously, you might be better off playing about with the angle of the cable against the wall.

 

www.myspace.com/davidbassportugal

 

"And then the magical unicorn will come prancing down the rainbow and we'll all join hands for a rousing chorus of Kumbaya." - by davio

 

 

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Ask Alex about this. There're some problems with honeycombing and whatnot. As I understand it, you more or less get different frequencies going in and out of phase with each other at different angles rather than a consistent-ish pattern.
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Yes I understand the theory. I did an acoustics module as part of my degree. I'm interested in the actual real world experiences of bass players.

Feel the groove internally within your own creativity. - fingertalkin

 

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Stick a solid round thing on the grill directly in front of the dust cap.

 

There's a name for this, but I've forgotten it.

 

I'm sure someone will provide...........

 

I'm guessing you're thinking of either Wave Guide or Phase Plug? ...though I've never heard either of those terms used when referring to a "a solid round thing on the grill directly in front of the dust cap."

 

Maybe Pattern Modifier is a better term; that's what Shure and DPA call the gizmos that mount on the ends of their microphones to physically alter the polar pattern of the transducer (which presumably is what that "solid round thing" is supposed to do).

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