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Passed some major PRS Gas


PRS Dude

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Hey gang,

 

My first post here. Figured it was time to sign up here and share the news. After wanting a PRS for 20+ years I have finally acquired 3 of them. Got the first one and fell in love immediately. I simply had to have more. They are hands down the best guitars I have ever owned in 37 years of playing. Here's a few shots to share with all of you.

 

http://fredandruby.smugmug.com/photos/541800150_L4jxc-O.jpg

http://www.fredandruby.com/photos/559507494_TSwBD-L.jpg

http://www.fredandruby.com/photos/561866258_KaDag-O.jpg

http://fredandruby.smugmug.com/photos/563623486_U7yQv-O.jpg

Jeff

 

PRS Private Stock Hollowbody II

PRS SC245 Limited #47

PRS CU22 20th Annv. Artist

Gibson ES-137

Fender VG Stratocaster

Martin Custom DSM

Epiphone Slash Limited Edition Les Paul

Univox Coily

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Or...you could have used that money for a downpayment on a new house! ;)

 

Just kidding....PRS makes nice guitars, even if they are a bit pricey.

 

I'm not a big fan of their big horn body cuts...but that one with the quilted finish and no upper horn is very sweet. I reallyh like their new Mira guitars. :cool:

But regarldess of the body styles...I'm sure they are great to play.

 

One thing I always wondered about their combi bridge/tail piece...how do you adjust intonation on them if/when you need to do any set-up changes?

It's pretty much fixed, just like on an acoustic...right?

 

Good luck with the guitars, and welcome to the forum...stick around. :wave:

miroslav - miroslavmusic.com

 

"Just because it happened to you, it doesn't mean it's important."

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Or...you could have used that money for a downpayment on a new house! ;)

 

Just kidding....PRS makes nice guitars, even if they are a bit pricey.

 

I'm not a big fan of their big horn body cuts...but that one with the quilted finish and no upper horn is very sweet. I reallyh like their new Mira guitars. :cool:

But regarldess of the body styles...I'm sure they are great to play.

 

One thing I always wondered about their combi bridge/tail piece...how do you adjust intonation on them if/when you need to do any set-up changes?

It's pretty much fixed, just like on an acoustic...right?

 

Good luck with the guitars, and welcome to the forum...stick around. :wave:

 

My Custom 24 is 11 years old now. It finally is getting to the point where it needs some fretwork and a setup. I don't know how many hours are on it but I'd have to guess it has been used on somewhere around 500 gigs, many recording sessions and many rehearsals. It still stays in tune consistently. I've never had to adjust the intonation. I can't stress to you enough how well put together this guitar is and how incredibly stable it is. I have sixteen guitars currently in the stable including some called Gibson, G&L, Hamer, and Gretsch and none of them come close to my PRS' for quality and playability. So the answer to your question is - they really don't need to be set up very often.

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Thanks for the kind welcome! My Hollowbody II has a fully adjustable stoptail piece. As for the other two, here's the info from the PRS site for adjusting intonation. Trust me, it is spot on. I needed to adjust them very slightly after being shipped from the dealer. I'm not sure if this applies to older models.

 

============================================================

 

Action height is adjustable by raising or lowering the studs the bridge sits on. To adjust the mounting bolts, first detune the instrument to relieve the tension on the bridge. Then using a Quarter, make the necessary adjustments and retune.

 

Intonation can be adjusted using the two allen set screws facing the tail end of the guitar. A strobe tuner or other electronic tuning device should be used. Match the octave (fretted) note of the first and sixth strings with their corresponding 12th fret open harmonics by shortening or lengthening the strings with the adjusting screws using the allen wrench provided. Start with the treble side and then go to the bass side, return to the treble side for one last check. The other four strings are present and will intonate correctly provided a conventionally gauged string set with a plain third (G) string is used. Use of a wound third string is not recommended with this bridge.

Jeff

 

PRS Private Stock Hollowbody II

PRS SC245 Limited #47

PRS CU22 20th Annv. Artist

Gibson ES-137

Fender VG Stratocaster

Martin Custom DSM

Epiphone Slash Limited Edition Les Paul

Univox Coily

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Intonation can be adjusted using the two allen set screws facing the tail end of the guitar.

 

Oh...OK.

So you can do the strings in groups of three (high 3 and low 3)...yes?

 

I never noticed the allen screws, but then, I haven't played a PRS in awhile...though I did try out the new Mira guitars one time not too long ago...but was mainly focused on the feel/tone.

 

I'm sure they are quite stable, since PRS guitars are top-quality builds, and they fine tune them when the build them...so no need for too much adjustments, but I was just wondering if it was possible.

miroslav - miroslavmusic.com

 

"Just because it happened to you, it doesn't mean it's important."

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So, PRS Dude, how would you describe their different "personalities", their characteristics of tone and feel?

 

Do you set 'em up and string 'em each with different, specific types and/or gauges, or do you use the same strings and basic set-up on all three?

Ask yourself- What Would Ren and Stimpy Do?

 

~ Caevan James-Michael Miller-O'Shite ~

_ ___ _ Leprechaun, Esquire _ ___ _

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I've owned two PRS guitars, a custom 24 w/a 10 top, and a CE 22 fret with an amazing quilted top and the best neck humbucker I've ever heard. Great guitars, both of them.

Both of them also had the PRS tremolo bridge/locking tuner setup, which is the best stock trem system for staying in tune despite frantic whammy bar crankin'. They have a different tone than the fixed bridge models. That's not hard to understand, given the differential in the amount of wood and metal in the bridges and bodies. It's a matter of taste I suppose, but that's the real PRS tone to me.

 

By the way, welcome aboard. The guys here are pretty neat, so stick around and get to know us.

Always remember that you�re unique. Just like everyone else.

 

 

 

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Yeah, My one and only guitar is a PRS... its only an SE, but still, its exemplary for quality. I've played a Custom 22 in-store a few times, and goddamn they're so nice... in my eyes, worth the money as long as you actually play.

 

Congrats on the axes! If you get any more, be sure to send me one of your spare ones ;)

Yep, I play the gee-tar
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PRS often gets a bad rap for being elitist and selling $15K "Private Stock" guitars to yuppie morons.

 

But their regular models are really awesome. I've had my '90 Custom for almost 16 years now and I can't overemphasize how nice it is to play a guitar with no flaws or idiocyncracies. Everything works perfectly and it sounds amazing. I went through a period where I didn't play much and moved a couple of times. I pulled the guitar out of the case after almost 2 years and only the G string was out of tune.

 

A good investment.

"You never can vouch for your own consciousness." - Norman Mailer
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I came real close to getting a particularly excellent PRS McCarty (double-cut) "with no flaws or idiocyncracies" back when they hadn't been out long, instead of my sunburst LP. It was "used", but very, very "like-new", having been part of some dealer-to-dealer wheeling and dealing, so the price was nice.

 

Realistically, that PRS was a better, more "pro" quality axe all-around. The reason that I still got that LP instead- "warts and all", it DEFINITELY has some flaws and idiosyncrasies of its own- was that I had always wanted one, and as nice as that PRS was, the only thing that's quite the same as a Les Paul is a Les Paul- or a dead-nuts copy or the design.

 

(Same thing with PRS guitars, though- they're their own unique beast, too, and a good one.)

Ask yourself- What Would Ren and Stimpy Do?

 

~ Caevan James-Michael Miller-O'Shite ~

_ ___ _ Leprechaun, Esquire _ ___ _

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I'll do my best to speak to the different questions. Here's a rundown of the 3 guitars.

 

PRS Private Stock Hollowbody II

One Piece Curly Quilted Maple Top and Back

Mixed Nickel / Gold Hardware

Original Birds w/ 14K Gold Outlines

Wide-Fat Neck

25" Scale

McCarty (Not Archtop) Pickups and Piezo pickups

Brazilian Rosewood Fretboard

Flame Maple Neck

11's with a wound G

 

It took me a bit to get used to 11's, but they have a big impact when using the Piezo pickup - especially with the wound G. It provides an incredible acoustic guitar sound. In the end I've never played a guitar that offers so many usable sounds.

 

PRS Custom 22 - 20th Anniversary

Artist Chevron Flame Top

Wisp Birds

Artist Package / Gold Hardware

Wide-Fat Neck

25" Scale

Dragon II Pickups

Brazilian Rosewood Fretboard

5-Way Rotary Knob

9's

 

This one plays like a dream. Initially I was thinking I'd have to go to 10's since the difference between 11's and 9's is so great, but I'm sticking with the 9's. It allows me to play very differently. I've been told it has "more of an edge" to it.

 

PRS SC245 Limited #47

New Birds

Quilt Maple 10 Top

Wide-Fat Neck

24.5" Scale

1957/2008 Pickups

Rosewood Fretboard

10's

 

Now we are talking true Vintage LP sound. That's really the best way to describe it. The pickups are using the same wire that was used in the original 1957 PAF Humbuckers.

 

In a nutshell they are very unique in many ways. I've had them for less than a month so I still have much to learn about how they will best suit me. Let's just say that I love PRS! If you have any other questions feel free to ask.

 

I have to say that the welcome here was much warmer than on another forum. Some folks started claiming that I stole the pics and was making the whole story up. I've not really shared the story behind all of this in effort to keep the topic about guitars. Not that I won't share, I just didn't want to go there first.

 

Thanks to all of you,

Jeff

Jeff

 

PRS Private Stock Hollowbody II

PRS SC245 Limited #47

PRS CU22 20th Annv. Artist

Gibson ES-137

Fender VG Stratocaster

Martin Custom DSM

Epiphone Slash Limited Edition Les Paul

Univox Coily

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Who said anything about a "welcome"? We're just leering at your guitars! ;):thu::D(I am just razzin' ya there! Welcome!)

 

Hey, PRS Dude- for your Hollowbody II, try either some DR "Pure Blues" round-core, solid/pure-nickel 11's, or DR "Zebra" alternating-wrap nickel/bronze 11's. I think you'll really like 'em on that guitar. I use the Pure Blues 11's (with a plain 3rd) on my LP.

Ask yourself- What Would Ren and Stimpy Do?

 

~ Caevan James-Michael Miller-O'Shite ~

_ ___ _ Leprechaun, Esquire _ ___ _

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I'm not finding that they offer the Zebra's with a Wound G string. Any idea if they happen to have a set that includes one? Everything I've read, both from PRS and players really stress the need for a Wound G. I should specify that I use the hollowbody as an electric guitar first and the Piezo acoustic second.

Jeff

 

PRS Private Stock Hollowbody II

PRS SC245 Limited #47

PRS CU22 20th Annv. Artist

Gibson ES-137

Fender VG Stratocaster

Martin Custom DSM

Epiphone Slash Limited Edition Les Paul

Univox Coily

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I'm not finding that they offer the Zebra's with a Wound G string. Any idea if they happen to have a set that includes one? Everything I've read, both from PRS and players really stress the need for a Wound G. I should specify that I use the hollowbody as an electric guitar first and the Piezo acoustic second.

 

Hmmn; their Medium-Lite ZA-11 set lists gauges .011" , .015" , .022" , .030" , .040" , .050" ; I'm pretty sure that the .022" is a plain-string.

 

However, their Medium ZA-12 set lists gauges .012" , .016" , .024" , .032" , .042" , .054" , and I'm certain that the .024" is a wound-string.

 

If that .022" is, in fact, a plain one, AND if you can hang with the .024" for a 3rd/"G", I know for a fact that you can order custom mixed-gauge sets from any DR dealer for little or no upcharge (I used to order custom mixed-gauge sets with the wound .024" for the 3rd/"F#" in Open-D tuning).

 

I can also heartily recommend their "Pure Blues" round-core/nickel set in 10's for the SC, and their "Tite-Fit" round-core/nickel-plated-steel set in 9's for the other one.

 

By the way, what was this other forum you mentioned, if you don't mind my asking? Just curious.

Ask yourself- What Would Ren and Stimpy Do?

 

~ Caevan James-Michael Miller-O'Shite ~

_ ___ _ Leprechaun, Esquire _ ___ _

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I'm not finding that they offer the Zebra's with a Wound G string. Any idea if they happen to have a set that includes one? Everything I've read, both from PRS and players really stress the need for a Wound G. I should specify that I use the hollowbody as an electric guitar first and the Piezo acoustic second.

 

Hmmn; their Medium-Lite ZA-11 set lists gauges .011" , .015" , .022" , .030" , .040" , .050" ; I'm pretty sure that the .022" is a plain-string.

 

However, their Medium ZA-12 set lists gauges .012" , .016" , .024" , .032" , .042" , .054" , and I'm certain that the .024" is a wound-string.

 

If that .022" is, in fact, a plain one, AND if you can hang with the .024" for a 3rd/"G", I know for a fact that you can order custom mixed-gauge sets from any DR dealer for little or no upcharge (I used to order custom mixed-gauge sets with the wound .024" for the 3rd/"F#" in Open-D tuning).

 

I can also heartily recommend their "Pure Blues" round-core/nickel set in 10's for the SC, and their "Tite-Fit" round-core/nickel-plated-steel set in 9's for the other one.

 

By the way, what was this other forum you mentioned, if you don't mind my asking? Just curious.

Thanks for the additional info. I just recently put new strings on all 3, but I'll be looking at DR's for my next oil change. :D

 

As for the other forum, it's one that thinks of themselves as the Ultimate forum. It was a couple of bad apples that were calling me a liar, etc. I didn't appreciate it. I chose to just delete the thread instead of playing their little game. Oh well.

Jeff

 

PRS Private Stock Hollowbody II

PRS SC245 Limited #47

PRS CU22 20th Annv. Artist

Gibson ES-137

Fender VG Stratocaster

Martin Custom DSM

Epiphone Slash Limited Edition Les Paul

Univox Coily

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Try those DR "Pure Blues" in 10's (or even 11's) on the Single-Cut, I bet you'd really, really love 'em on that one!

 

I use 'em, in .011" - .050" , on my LP, and consider them the best "vintage" string for Gibsons, especially their shorter-scale models like LPs, 335s, etc.

 

The "Tite-Fit" strings are the same design with a different wrap on the wound-strings, for a more modern, slightly "scooped" (by comparison to the all nickel PB's) and brighter tone with more bite, highs and low-lows; maybe a good match for your Custom 22. The PB's have more mids than the TF's and a punchy sort of full, warm, fat thrust.

Ask yourself- What Would Ren and Stimpy Do?

 

~ Caevan James-Michael Miller-O'Shite ~

_ ___ _ Leprechaun, Esquire _ ___ _

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I switched to DR strings when I bought my McCarty. I had been useing the Pure Blues on my Tele but recently switched to the "reissue" Dean Markleys. Those are the strings I used "back in the day". I'm thinking I'll probably go back to the Pure Blues for the Tele and keep the DM's for my more rockin' guitars.
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I pulled the guitar out of the case after almost 2 years and only the G string was out of tune.

 

Seeing this written here makes me laugh a bit, because the G string is actually the problem for my PRS. Everything else seems to stay absolutely perfect, but every few weeks I have to retune the damn G string. I know tuning it every few weeks is still impeccable, but its interesting that the G is specifically the one that PRS reliably seems to be letting slip.

Yep, I play the gee-tar
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I pulled the guitar out of the case after almost 2 years and only the G string was out of tune.

 

Seeing this written here makes me laugh a bit, because the G string is actually the problem for my PRS. Everything else seems to stay absolutely perfect, but every few weeks I have to retune the damn G string. I know tuning it every few weeks is still impeccable, but its interesting that the G is specifically the one that PRS reliably seems to be letting slip.

 

I don't think it's a matter of the 3rd/"G" being "one that PRS reliably seems to be letting slip"; one way or another, the 3rd-string is a gremlin and a demon for ALL guitar-scaled/tuned instruments, whether it's intonation, tuning-stability, balance in tension, balance in perceived volume, choosing between a wound or plain string for the 3rd/"G"... It's a nexus of pitch, scale-length, and temperament that always seems to be the wrong place at the wrong time.

Ask yourself- What Would Ren and Stimpy Do?

 

~ Caevan James-Michael Miller-O'Shite ~

_ ___ _ Leprechaun, Esquire _ ___ _

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I pulled the guitar out of the case after almost 2 years and only the G string was out of tune.

 

Seeing this written here makes me laugh a bit, because the G string is actually the problem for my PRS. Everything else seems to stay absolutely perfect, but every few weeks I have to retune the damn G string. I know tuning it every few weeks is still impeccable, but its interesting that the G is specifically the one that PRS reliably seems to be letting slip.

 

I don't think it's a matter of the 3rd/"G" being "one that PRS reliably seems to be letting slip"; one way or another, the 3rd-string is a gremlin and a demon for ALL guitar-scaled/tuned instruments, whether it's intonation, tuning-stability, balance in tension, balance in perceived volume, choosing between a wound or plain string for the 3rd/"G"... It's a nexus of pitch, scale-length, and temperament that always seems to be the wrong place at the wrong time.

 

That's true. For me, this seems to happen more often with whammy bars that don't come with at least a good set of locking tuners. I've never had this problem with fixed bridges, Floyds or Kahlers.

 

Also, lengthening the scale a bit (from, say, 25.5 to 26-27 in.) seems to reduce the problem further, as that allows more tension to help keep the strings in tune. As a 7 string player (who still likes 6ers), I really should be using a longer scale than 25.5, but I still want to do those 9th chords comfortably enough.

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I don't think it's a matter of the 3rd/"G" being "one that PRS reliably seems to be letting slip"; one way or another, the 3rd-string is a gremlin and a demon for ALL guitar-scaled/tuned instruments, whether it's intonation, tuning-stability, balance in tension, balance in perceived volume, choosing between a wound or plain string for the 3rd/"G"... It's a nexus of pitch, scale-length, and temperament that always seems to be the wrong place at the wrong time.

 

That's true. For me, this seems to happen more often with whammy bars that don't come with at least a good set of locking tuners. I've never had this problem with fixed bridges, Floyds or Kahlers.

 

Many, many years ago, I took a new custom Strat-style with a floating Kahler fulcrum stylee and a behind-the-nut lock/clamp back to the shop where I'd bought it, because its 3rd/"G" tended to go out of tune as it managed to slip and catch again in the nut-clamp (which, in turn, would throw the remaining five strings off, what with the floating trem-bridge).

 

When I explained the problem and which string seemed the worst, the entire shop-staff replied in well rehearsed unison, "AAAAHH! The THIRD STRING! THE DEVIL STRING!! Yhup." :D

 

Also, lengthening the scale a bit (from, say, 25.5 to 26-27 in.) seems to reduce the problem further, as that allows more tension to help keep the strings in tune. As a 7 string player (who still likes 6ers), I really should be using a longer scale than 25.5, but I still want to do those 9th chords comfortably enough.

 

Longer scale lengths improve intonation, as well, and also increase the amount and richness of harmonic-overtones. Kinda like "hi-res" for string vibrations. :thu:

 

Shorter scale-lengths are more prone to intonation issues, and have less overtones and more fundamental frequencies.

 

The scale-lengths of most PRS guitars fall in between that of Les Pauls and Strats, for example.

Ask yourself- What Would Ren and Stimpy Do?

 

~ Caevan James-Michael Miller-O'Shite ~

_ ___ _ Leprechaun, Esquire _ ___ _

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Many, many years ago, I took a new custom Strat-style with a floating Kahler fulcrum stylee and a behind-the-nut lock/clamp back to the shop where I'd bought it, because its 3rd/"G" tended to go out of tune as it managed to slip and catch again in the nut-clamp (which, in turn, would throw the remaining five strings off, what with the floating trem-bridge).

 

When I explained the problem and which string seemed the worst, the entire shop-staff replied in well rehearsed unison, "AAAAHH! The THIRD STRING! THE DEVIL STRING!! Yhup." :D

 

 

Ugh, I don't like the Kahlers set up that way... better to use the nut clamps like the Floyds use!

 

Speaking of PRS's... I am impressed by the SE models. They lack the locking tuners of the higher end PRS's, but that can easily be rectified by replacing the stock tuners + a graphite nut.

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Ugh, I don't like the Kahlers set up that way... better to use the nut clamps like the Floyds use!

 

Speaking of PRS's... I am impressed by the SE models. They lack the locking tuners of the higher end PRS's, but that can easily be rectified by replacing the stock tuners + a graphite nut.

 

I agree on the PRS SE models being great guitars, especially for the money. A friend of mine has one, a single-cut/dual hb model, and it's a very light, vintage-y guitar with good tone and playability; sounds great clean or dirty.

 

And as for that custom "Super-Strat" stylee, I wound up going with a roller-nut, and no nut-lock/clamp at all; and I immobilized the fine-tuners on the Kahler Fulcrum bridge (the type that still uses springs in the back, like a Strat) by tighteneing them full-up with some Loc-Tite applied to their threads.

Ask yourself- What Would Ren and Stimpy Do?

 

~ Caevan James-Michael Miller-O'Shite ~

_ ___ _ Leprechaun, Esquire _ ___ _

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