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Easy songs you can't wrap your brain around!


Outkaster

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We struggled to get Commander Cody's "Rock That Boogie" in shape. It is piano driven and I would get the oddest looks as the bass and guitar would guess wrong (basing the changes on what we had just done) about where it was headed. Here's part of an email I sent after I sat down and wrote it out.

 

"There's a reason we've always struggled with "Rock That Boogie". I never really charted it out since I learned the song 30+ years ago and can pretty much play it without thinking. It is an odd mix of 12 and 16 bar I - IV - V blues, has a 4 bar piano vamp in between the chorus and each verse (but not after the solos) and the piano solo is different than the other solo(s).

 

Other than that it's really simple..."

aka âmisterdregsâ

 

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Re: Happy Birthday - sometimes I try to back it up for birthday parties at the office, and while I hit the tonic chord and sing the first note, and it's STILL in 5 or 6 different keys at once. To me it's a bizarre experience, even a little bit SURREAL, but no one else seems to care at all.. and yes, it is about the people's birthdays, not musical accuracy..

Can't help it though - I like to have the music sound good if at all possible.

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I had the same difficulty playing the horn parts along with the clav bass line on "I Wish". When it works though it rocks!

 

Same here! I had to work those parts together for at least 1h before my hand started complaining. After taking a break everything aligned perfectly :)

 

Btw, isn't that a rhodes, or am I wrong and it really is clavinet? I kinda remember it to be a rhodes.

 

It's definitely an electric piano, likely a Rhodes from the sound. However I've often used a clav for some more bite doubling the bass line.

Instrumentation is meaningless - a song either stands on its own merit, or it requires bells and whistles to cover its lack of adequacy, much less quality. - kanker
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Re: Happy Birthday - sometimes I try to back it up for birthday parties at the office, and while I hit the tonic chord and sing the first note, and it's STILL in 5 or 6 different keys at once.

 

I solve (well, not solve, but make it slightly better) this by playing an intro. I play the last 2.333 bars (sorry - the part that starts on the 4th).

 

A problem I do have with this song is people that like to play it alternateing between 3/4 and 4/4 time. It comes out as some bizarre mixture between the two. Any one noticed this?

I'm just saying', everyone that confuses correlation with causation eventually ends up dead.
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I usually play a bluesy intro, let the singer (and audience) sing it in a relaxed (only basic bluesy chords layed down) tempo, and then I kick it up one notch and start playing shuffle. Or something groovy/funky. Depends on the mood.

 

And it's much more fun to play it other way than everyone else does it.

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Any song that I haven't played in over a week.

 

There's wisdom in this response! If I don't dust off a tune the day before a gig to be certain that all of it is in current muscle memory - there's a good chance I'll bonk it.

 

I stand a better than even chance of a good bonk even under ideal conditions......to me its more in how you recover from the "error of your ways" than worrying about the inevitable "error!"

 

Perhaps a bandmate might hear the problem and react, but a wink or a nod will usually let then know you are back on it.

 

Just a thought :rimshot:

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Any song that I haven't played in over a week.

 

There's wisdom in this response! If I don't dust off a tune the day before a gig to be certain that all of it is in current muscle memory - there's a good chance I'll bonk it.

 

I stand a better than even chance of a good bonk even under ideal conditions......to me its more in how you recover from the "error of your ways" than worrying about the inevitable "error!"

 

Perhaps a bandmate might hear the problem and react, but a wink or a nod will usually let then know you are back on it.

 

Just a thought :rimshot:

 

Oh, I don't worry about 'em - and agree that it's all about the recovery.

 

However, being that I've realized that I can avoid the vast majority of 'em simply by making sure I run down the setlist on sometime in the 24 hours before a gig - I do whatever I need to do to ensure that I find that hour or so I need to get it done.

 

It's part of my pre-gig preparation ritual these days. There was a time when I was gigging 4-6 nights a week when it wasn't necessary - however now that I'm on a twice a month whether I need to or not schedule - I've had to adjust my program a little.

 

The SpaceNorman :freak:
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I have cheat sheets on all the songs I play. Charted with the Nashville numbering system. Keeps the mistakes down and I don't have to memorize all the songs ... which at my age seems to be getting harder to do.

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