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Leslie Speeds


Mike Martin

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Are there any rules or suggestions for leslie speeds (top and bottom), slow and fast and ramp up times?

 

It looks like I might have some gigs coming up and I have a few options to consider. The PC3X will be my primary board - but I've never been 100% sold on the organs.

 

So I dug out my old Motion Sound R3-147 and hooked it up the PC3X. I've taken some of the stock KB3 program and removed the Leslie simulation just leaving me the chorus/vibrato effect if needed. It sounds pretty damn good. The R3-147 actually has a lot of control for speed seetings but I'm wondering what settings are too fast or too slow, or how long the ramp up/down speeds should take. Any place to look for reference? Then again, how would I measure it?

 

As another option, I could take a laptop and just run B4II - but that means bringing an audio interface...etc and might be too much hassle.

-Mike Martin

 

Casio

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The Big Picture Photography Forum on Music Player Network

 

The opinions I post here are my own and do not represent the company I work for.

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Best bet is to check out your favorite organ recordings. As the leslie is such a physical/mechanical beast, there are no STRICT specs for Fast=x, Slow=X, ramp up=, etc. There are various pulley positions, the tension of the belt plays into things, the tensile strength of the belts are a factor, as are the condition of the motors and other parts as well. Then factor in whether we're talking about 122 or 147 leslies and their switching speeds, and you can see where there's no "right" answer.

 

Check out some "Damn The Torpedoes" by Tom Petty to hear some well recorded Benmont Tench Hammond work, and then take it from there.

Hitting "Play" does NOT constitute live performance. -Me.
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They have the same speeds for the lower baffle emulation in the Pro3, 3t and 3x, and the stock settings are fine.

The speeds sound best IMHO when you increase/decrease your drawbar footages when changing speeds.

I did without a B3/Leslie for about ten years and was so happy when Motion Sound came out. I immediately bought a couple of different Clones and went to town.

Didn't really become totally satisfied until Creamware released their B2003. Since then it's been a blast.

I use a couple of custom DSP MIDI tricks and Tube PreAmp dev.'s because the lower baffle was woofy and had no dirt.

The best thing about all of the virtual stuff is the way you can get the different cabinet tones and cover several styles.

 

I think you're gonna have a blast and probably start messing around more with it.

 

I use an expression pedal w/ custom MIDI curves that moves all of my drawbars to the desired markings, and even have 2 seconds worth of lag time if needed. I have more fun now than I did when I had the B/les combo...

 

Have a good gig.

Magnus C350 and a TV Dinner Tray Stand

 

http://soundcloud.com/you/sets

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The back of the Leslie 2101 owner's manual lists the two sets of speeds for the two "stock," leslies it emulates. To sort of average this out figure 36 RPM for the bass rotor slow with a 6 second rise time and 3 second fall time and 400 RPM fast. For the horn, 36 RPM slow and 400 RPM fast with a 2 second rise and 1.2 second fall. This ought to be be a good setting to let the tweaking begin. For other parameters go to the HamSuz site and under service and support you will find the owners manuals for the leslie models. Might want to check our the 3300 parameters as well. Hope this helps.
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As tonysounds said, keep in mind that Leslies (vintage ones anyway) have three pulleys on the rotor motor, each giving a different speed depending on which one you place the belt in. Mine is in the middle one.

 

When it comes to setting speeds on sims, I ignore what a real Leslie does and go for what sounds the most natural, which is usually a bit slower than a real one. There's a sweet spot in every sim and that's what I try to find. The same goes for ramp-ups, which I usually set faster than the real deal because sims get unnaturally warbly in transition. I don't care about authenticity, only what sounds good.

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Um ... I would go with what sounds good when you play it.

 

I like slow ramp up/down speeds; I just love hearing the Leslie kicking in, and I sometimes tap my speed switch (which is momentary on) to get intermediate speeds for short periods. Other people need the instant-on of later Leslie models. It's a matter of taste and style. (I have it; they must not! ;) )

 

Yeah, what Bill said.

 

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Great answers everyone!

I realize that it all comes down to personal peference. Jeff, I'm going to try some slow ramp up/down speeds as you suggest. When checking out most of the simulations on B4II the top rotor really gets up and going almost instantly. I'll have to move things around so I can adjust it and experiment more when I get home this weekend.

-Mike Martin

 

Casio

Mike Martin Photography Instagram Facebook

The Big Picture Photography Forum on Music Player Network

 

The opinions I post here are my own and do not represent the company I work for.

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On the genuine Leslies that I worked on over the years, the top rotor will wind up speed and slow down speed MUCH faster than the low rotor. The motors are the same size for both sections (fast and slow motors for each), but the treble horn has a small fraction of the mass of the rotating baffle for the low frequencies. So the B4II simulation is working in the same way as a real Leslie. Having said that, the times are closer to each other if the Leslie is in very good condition, with bearings that spin freely, and with belts that firmly hold on to the motor pulleys. Older well worn Leslies tend to have some friction buildup in the bearings, especially the LF ones, and the belts get loose and slick, causing a longer windup and down, also especially on the LF side. Also, some of the Leslies have a three speed pulley on the motor for fast speed, does not make a huge change but does make a few rpm change.

 

Howard Grand|Hamm SK1-73|Kurz PC2|PC2X|PC3|PC3X|PC361; QSC K10's

HP DAW|Epi Les Paul & LP 5-str bass|iPad mini2

"Now faith is the substance of things hoped for, the evidence of things not seen."

Jim

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I agree with learjeff, I would go with what sounds good when you play it. What makes you go "wow.....great organ"

Tweak it until it sounds right to you.

 

Hey Jaime, is that a CS-80?

Montage 7, Mojo 61, PC-3, XK-3c Pro, Kronos 88, Hammond SK-1, Motif XF- 7, Hammond SK-2, Roland FR-1, FR-18, Hammond B3 - Blond, Hammond BV -Cherry
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