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Horrible Performance


yourlord

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Well, I think we have managed to serve up our first horrible show.. Nobody got out of last night without hosing up several things pretty noticeably..

 

I managed to blow 2 notes a half step flat in creeping death, blew one of my runs in one of our songs, and timing was a little iffy on most of the other songs (see below). On Breaking the Law the rest of the band started playing the song while I was still plugging in my bass after swapping instruments.

 

The singer managed to forget the words to creeping death and stopped in the middle of the song for 1 full verse.

 

My brother pulled a muscle in his arm on the 3rd song and proceeded to suck like a black hole from that point on, though I give him props for finishing out the rest of the set with his arm hurting like mad..

 

And the drummer just had random timing issues, mangled fills, off time beats, wavering time (which made the rest of us waver in an attempt to keep in sync), etc..

 

 

it was a special night.. The only good thing about it was the only people there was the staff and our families, and the band that played before us.. The band before us rocked the place, which made our catastrophe even more special..

 

Any other horror stories? I'm sure this one is minor in comparison to some, but last night dinged morale a bit.. It's the first time we finished a set, looked at each other, and knew we sucked..

 

 

Feel free to visit my band's site

Delusional Mind

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Sounds like you suffered from not letting mistakes go. If you make an error immediately forget about it and move on. The more you dwell on a mistake the more likely you are to make another... and another... and another.... It's infectious as well. If other band members actually hear your error and they begin to think/worry about it they will start to make mistakes as well. You can see where that train wreck is going.

 

If you make a mistake forget about it and move on. If you really want to beat yourself up over it do so after you're done playing that night. Besides most of the people in the audience will have no clue that an error was made most of the time. Really.

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Everyone has a bad night occasionally -- that doesn't mean you and your band suck.

 

I had a gig this summer where the leader started a song in different key than the chart I had in front of me -- that led to some interesting tones, let me tell you.

 

Her flimsy excuse was that she'd had brain surgery for an aneurysm six weeks before. Can you believe it?

 

Walk it off -- you'll do better next time.

"Tours widely in the southwestern tip of Kentucky"
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Trust me.. A deaf man 3 buildings down could have told on several of them.. I didn't dwell too much.. I had a bad blunder in 2 spots, and the rest of my issues were due to trying to stay in time with the drums.. The last 2 songs of the set I nailed, and the 2nd to last is the hardest to play.

 

I did commit a sin though. on my 1st really bad blunder, when I totally blew one of my runs in one of our songs, I very plainly cringed.. I knew it the second I made that face.. If anyone didn't notice the mistake, they noticed that look..

 

 

Feel free to visit my band's site

Delusional Mind

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During the show, you should worry about a clinker for precisely as long as it takes for the sound waves from it to stop vibrating.

 

It happens to everybody. I saw a vid of Clapton one time starting his solo on "White Room" one fret high. He laughed it off, and you should, too. Part of the fun of live performing!

 

 

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I did commit a sin though. on my 1st really bad blunder, when I totally blew one of my runs in one of our songs, I very plainly cringed.. I knew it the second I made that face.. If anyone didn't notice the mistake, they noticed that look..

 

 

Aw, they probably just thought it was "bass face." No worries.

"Tours widely in the southwestern tip of Kentucky"
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Yea... Welcome to giggin'

 

Everyone has stories. The key is for everyone in the band to not take it too seriously. It is funny how some nights you can't hit a bad note and others you can't hit a good one. Most nights are just fine. The others give you something to laugh about. You can bond pretty quickly with your bandmates after you stand in the fire for just a short while. There have been times that I have completely lost my mind and couldn't remember the rythym of a song while playing it.... The guitarist just covered for me and gave it back to me, then moved on... most people don't notice.

 

My wife has to endure us practicing twice a week so she knows our songs well. She always has a big grin on her face when I mess up (she sits facing the band, usually). She knows it has happened, but she is one of the few...

 

Mistakes like the ones you describe make you better because you learn how to deal with them with minimal impact, eventually. Life goes on and you don't suck, just becuase you sucked.

"When I take a stroll down Jackass Lane it is usually to see someone that is already there" Mrs. Brown
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my teacher/guitarist/buddy used to say. "Once you hit that bad note, it's out there and gone."

 

Do you dwell on the things you do well or do you move on to the next note, passage or song?

 

Relax and enjoy yourself.

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oh... those things happen. I had a band in where we´d play along with a computer running Cakewalk for midi sequencing, hooked to a rack of synth modules. I´ve sequenced all the keyboard parts myself, and when the venues were real real small, I´d run a spare cable from an Alesis SR-16 drum machine to have the drums (I´d sequenced the drum parts also, being a TOTAL enemy of playing along with drum patterns). If the venues were large enough, we´d bring a real drummer, which had a line from the rack to a headphones amp with a click track so we were in sync.

 

So, sync was out of the question, never had any trouble with it. But once (fortunately, also a very small and familiar venue), we were playing at a school´s fair, and had on our set "Hard to say I´m sorry" by Chicago. Well.. beer abounded, and our lead guitar had one too much of it. So we launched into the song, no problem, the voices were okay... we sailed through the tone-up shift, and then the guitar solo came... our friend approached the edge of the stage (pretty away from where we were stuck to our microphone stands and amps), and kneeled on the floor for a perfect note-by-note rendition of the guitar solo... only one fret higher!. It sounded like a bad train wreck, and the guy was in front of the monitor line, "inspired" enough not to notice it, and we were back enough to kick him and make him correct it (Since the keyboard parts were sequenced, there was also no way for any of us to try catching with him half-step up). When the solo ended he kept with the song, but IN tune, and never found out what happened until watching the video.. two days later. At the end of the song the other guitar player approached to his microphone and said "Hard to say I´m sorry.. but I guess one of our friends will". :P

 

 

 

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..I did commit a sin though. on my 1st really bad blunder, when I totally blew one of my runs in one of our songs, I very plainly cringed.. I knew it the second I made that face.. If anyone didn't notice the mistake, they noticed that look...

 

Ah yes, the famous "clam face." :D

 

At least you didn't smack yourself in the forehead, close your eyes and shake your head. I once played with a fellow who was notorious for doing this any time he misplayed a note. For anyone who didn't hear the bum note, it was very obvious to see, based on his reaction.

Mudcat's music on Soundclick

 

"Work hard. Rock hard. Eat hard. Sleep hard. Grow big. Wear glasses if you need 'em."-The Webb Wilder Credo-

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I played in the originals band last Saturday. I played a quite a lot of jazz notes ;) I'm blaming it on a tooth abscess and some particularly evil anti-biotics. At the end of the set I was approached by one of the bass players who had been studying all the songs and had auditioned with them. (I'm supposed to be the temporary fill-in bass player, although I'm starting to wonder if I have set the bar a bit high?) She said that I totally nailed every tune. Was she at the same gig? :confused:

 

Remember that even somebody who knows the tunes and is watching closely to see if you mess up cannot rewind to check whether what they just heard was wrong. Most listeners will just hear something slightly wrong. Just blame your brother, he's already admitted pulling a muscle.

 

I was berated by our drummer at one gig. He constantly shouted at me during the the first 6 tunes of a set and told me to concentrate and stop playing wrong notes. When we had a chance to stop, the guitarist tuned up and the problem was solved. I'm still waiting for an apology :mad:.

Feel the groove internally within your own creativity. - fingertalkin

 

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I was berated by our drummer at one gig. He constantly shouted at me during the the first 6 tunes of a set and told me to concentrate and stop playing wrong notes. When we had a chance to stop, the guitarist tuned up and the problem was solved. I'm still waiting for an apology :mad:.

 

That reminded me of a video of one of our songs at a show last month.. My brother totally blew the melodic beginning of the song in 2 places, but the errors emitted a bass like burping sound, and the other guitarist kept giving me crap about how I messed up the beginning of the song. I had to bring up the video to show him it was my brother that did it..

Feel free to visit my band's site

Delusional Mind

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If you ever make a mistake, just quit playing music forever.

 

Right on! :)

 

Seriously though, whoever came up with that old bullsh!t about "you're only as good as your last gig!" was obviously not a gigging musician.

 

Everybody makes mistakes. To assume, for example, that EVH can't play anymore just because some tech screwed up the pre-recorded keyboards is ludicrous (I'm referring to that YouTube video that's been doing the rounds). Everyone makes mistakes. Just forget about them and get back on that horse.

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I am the king of the half step slide into the correct note. I should come up with a name for it! Listen to the Rush R30 recording of limelight. Either they play a controlled train wreck coming out of the solo or I am not a big enough fan to know how they play it live.

How do you sign a computer screen?

 

 

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Ugh...we had one of those gigs on Halloween this year. It should have been a really strong show given what we've drawn in years past...but the cops had descended on the town due to some recent trouble at this venue. Hence, relatively low crowd turnout...maybe 120 people, and we'd expected much higher. So, outta the gate everyone is a little bummed. Then throw in the fact our drummer was in a Star Wars Stormtrooper outfit and couldn't hear himself, or us because of his costume helmet. Then after the first set each of us dives into the happy drinks a little too much and, lo' and behold, somewhere in the second set everything just went to crap. By the third set, I was seeing ten strings on my bass, not five, the vocalist blew some lines, our lead guitarist made a rare mistake here and there...everything just fell apart by our standards. And yet, from people in the crowd I talked to, all they noticed was "a little something wrong" but could not point out what it was they heard. So I agree, it is much more noticable to the musician than it is the listener.

 

Then the next show we turned around and all was right with the universe...great turnout and crowd response and the night just flew by with smiles on all our faces.

My doctor says I'm A.D.D. - I just like to think of it as "multi-tasking"...

 

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Ah everyone's had shows like this. The last show my band did as a three-piece, we were the opening act. Hardly any crowd except our loyal fan base (about 8 - 10 people) and the festival crew. We started the first song too slow and I ended it too quickly (and this is one we've been playing for ages). Singer forgot several lines of lyrics and just mumbled his way through (thank god it was a Johnny Cash tune :)).

 

Then we proceeded to play "Rawhide" (yes, I know :rolleyes:) and I totally blew the instrumental middle piece. It sounded like a black hole was about to suck up the universe. Afterwards I asked around, and no one had even noticed ...

 

The next gig, we had a lead guitarist in the line-up, and we were smoking !!! BTW, we dropped Rawhide after that one live performance :thu:

"I'm a work in progress." Micky Barnes

 

The Ross Brown Shirt World Tour

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Yeah, well, it's at bad gigs where you realize how much a band is like any other sort of team.

 

Personally, I think that, after a mistake (and technical difficulties aside), you make a subconscious decision to have a crap gig. Or not. Bass players, especially, can be invaluable in picking up the slack and putting the band on the right track again.

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Meh. My two cents? $#!% happens. Move on. Oar knot. The choice is yours.

 

Plus, if I recall correctly, none of your axes are black. Therefore you weren't loud enough and no one could hear you screw up anyway.

 

Peace.

--SW

 

spreadluv

 

Fanboy? Why, yes! Nordstrand Pickups and Guitars.

Messiaen knew how to parlay the funk.

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I've never had anyone complain about me not being loud enough.. My basses aren't black, but my rig is!

 

Anyway, we played another show this past Saturday. Great mid sized venue, good stage, great promoter. We played 2nd in a line up of 3 bands, and both the other bands rocked the place. We did pretty good too. It was still a little on the rough side in spots, but we did well enough to call it a success.. Had a great crowd.. Made 2 times on that one gig what we've made on the last 5 gigs put together..

 

I had 1 really bad spot where I blew this simple bridge in one of our songs.. It's so easy to play and I just drew a blank, but I picked it up after that blunder and drove the rest of the set home..

 

That gig is what playing live is supposed to be.. Great vibes between all 3 bands, and the promoter actually cares more about music than his wallet.. How often do you find that?

 

 

Feel free to visit my band's site

Delusional Mind

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...we played another show this past Saturday...We did pretty good too. It was still a little on the rough side in spots, but we did well enough to call it a success..
See?

 

I had 1 really bad spot where I blew this simple bridge in one of our songs.. It's so easy to play and I just drew a blank, but I picked it up after that blunder and drove the rest of the set home...

Now you understand, Daniel-san. Wax on, wax off!

 

 

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I've blown too many notes to mention, though I recently posted that I muffed a note or two in the solo in Life In The Fast Lane when Willie came to see the band in July.

 

I find that when the band has energy and confidence, mistakes just go by like the wind (even train wreck restarts). When people are uncomfortable, tired, or nervous - well, every goof is another step down into the abyss.

 

Rock on !!

Tom

www.stoneflyrocks.com

Acoustic Color

 

Be practical as well as generous in your ideals. Keep your eyes on the stars and keep your feet on the ground. - Theodore Roosevelt

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Sounds like someone caught a goof bug, and the rest of the band came down with it. At the other end of the spectrum are the nights that you couldn't make a mistake if you tried, the mix is perfect, members are successfully improv--ing to the delight of everyone else, the adrenalin is flowing, the room is responding accordingly, and you would play a 5th set for free. Ideally, that would be every night, but it never is, no matter how great you are. But, some see them much more often than others.

 

 

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