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How many of you guys have a Roland AX7 (keytar)?


DanS

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Ive posted this before, and at the risk of public humiliation Ill disclose that have two AX-1s (precursor to the AX-7) from back when I was in a mid-1990s project that involved playing heavy metal using keytars, modules, and Marshall amps. Not a single electric guitar or bass to be found; three keytars and a drummer. I largely played rhythm guitar with an occasional lead. We were called Roadpig and Keyboard magazine was kind enough to do a full-page article on us (see November 1994, p. 16, thats me on the far right). My AX-1s are collecting dust at the moment....I haven't used them in several years. The former leader of the project, Jeffrey Abbott, can do some amazing things with one of these things. Check out some of his work:

 

http://www.jeffreyabbott.com/

 

"We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing."

- George Bernard Shaw

 

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HA HA HA HA HA HAHA HA HA AH HA HA HA AH AH AHHHHHHHHH~

 

GOOD ONE!!! :thu:

Not to hijack the thread, but it seems there is more negative reaction to keytars among us keyboard players than any other population. Outside of this group, I bet reactions to them are neutral to slightly positive, on average. Not that Im ready to strap one on anytime soon.....but as a social scientist, Im wondering why we dont like them?

"We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing."

- George Bernard Shaw

 

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I don't think keytars are geeky at all - sorry. Like any other instrument, it depends what you do with them. I've seen people look stupid with them, and I've seen people play the hell out of them - Chick Corea and Jan Hammer to mind...

 

I have an AX7. I use it occasionally, mostly during Hallowee'en when my band plays Godzilla...or sometimes when we do Surrender, but I do break the thing out occasionally. Like DanS said above...it's fun. :thu:

 

dB

:snax:

 

:keys:==> David Bryce Music • Funky Young Monks <==:rawk:

 

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Key Tars, flexible keyboard stands, guitar straps on keyboards, military intelligence, Government Organization, Alone Together, Personal Computer, Silent Scream, Living Dead, Same Difference, Taped Live, Plastic Glasses, Tight Slacks, Peace Force, Pretty Ugly, Head Butt, Working Vacation, Tax Return, Virtual Reality, Dodge Ram, Work Party, Jumbo Shrimp, Healthy Tan, Microsoft Works.

 

I see a pattern developing here.

Everybody's got to believe in something. I believe I'll have another beer. W. C. Fields
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I was in a mid-1990s project that involved playing heavy metal using keytars, modules, and Marshall amps. Not a single electric guitar or bass to be found; three keytars and a drummer. I largely played rhythm guitar with an occasional lead. We were called Roadpig and Keyboard magazine was kind enough to do a full-page article on us (see November 1994, p. 16, thats me on the far right). My AX-1s are collecting dust at the moment....I haven't used them in several years. The former leader of the project, Jeffrey Abbott, can do some amazing things with one of these things. Check out some of his work:

 

http://www.jeffreyabbott.com/

 

THIS guy used to play in a heavy metal project called "Roadpig"?!?!? My, how things change . . . .

 

 

(By the way, this is not to say that the guy's not talented. IMO, he clearly is. It's just that he's obviously sold out to the music-buying masses. Keep it real, man. Break those Marshalls out of storage and start rockin' again!)

 

Noah

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HA HA HA HA HA HAHA HA HA AH HA HA HA AH AH AHHHHHHHHH~

 

GOOD ONE!!! :thu:

Not to hijack the thread, but it seems there is more negative reaction to keytars among us keyboard players than any other population. Outside of this group, I bet reactions to them are neutral to slightly positive, on average. Not that Im ready to strap one on anytime soon.....but as a social scientist, Im wondering why we dont like them?

If nothing else here get's Dick Ward's attention, this thread surely should! ;)

 

As someone who does not perform live on keys, and thus fall into Moonglow's hypothetical condition, I also think I follow his hypothetical result: I'm neutral to slightly positive on keytars. It's kind of nice to unroot you guys once in a while and let you run around on stage. ;)

 

Now I don't know how I'd feel if someone invented a drumtar. :freak: Drummers would just look wrong if they stood up and walked around on stage, drumming on some tiny little electronic device or even into the air on virtual drums.

 

How about the other way around? Do guys that play lap/pedal/steel/whateveryoucallit guitar look out of place when they sit behind a table-like guitar on stage? (Funny, my mental image is always of some old gray-haired guy playing one of those, like he's too old to stand for an entire concert.)

 

What's the real resistance to keytars? People dissing you, telling you to play a real guitar instead of a fake one? Or does the keytar evoke the image of that other mobile keyboard instrument, the one featured at bar mitzvahs and polka bands?

 

Would it be cooler to have your keyboard on a stand with wheels, like a giant granny walker? :eek::D

 

Other than the history of large, bulky, immovable pianos and organs, why should keyboards be immobile?

 

Was there an uproar when you guys gave up your piano/organ benches, got taller keyboard stands and decided to stand?

 

I remember when my high school marching band did a parade. The xylophone and bell lyre players didn't look out of place with their instruments strapped on them. (Although they were in considerable pain because they weren't used to carrying their instruments around like that.) Would you rather play keys with that kind of setup?

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What's the real resistance to keytars? People dissing you, telling you to play a real guitar instead of a fake one? Or does the keytar evoke the image of that other mobile keyboard instrument, the one featured at bar mitzvahs and polka bands?
To me, the keytar is a 'Me too!! me too!!! don't forget about me!!!!!' desperate attempt by keyboard players to make the audience think of them as a guitar player instead of as a musician. YMMV

 

 

 

(Show some pride boys, sit down and play like a real man)

A ROMpler is just a polyphonic turntable.
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.....Break those Marshalls out of storage and start rockin' again!)

 

Noah

I hear ya brother Noah! It was a fun project while it lasted..but he has to pay the bills! Per my last contact with Jeffrey about a year ago, he was on the verge of another overseas tour (the Netherlands, I believe).

 

This video has a couple of segments more representative of Roadpig:

 

 

Enjoy!

 

"We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing."

- George Bernard Shaw

 

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How would a guitarist react if they came out with a six string version of his axe which kind of looked like a pedal steel but only in a nice tolex keyboard like case? Would they embrace it or would they question why anyone would want to emulate a keyboard player when playing guitar?

 

Two different instruments, two differents worlds. Next thing you know cats and dogs will be living together...

 

Steve

A Lifetime of Peace, Love and Protest Music

www.rock-xtreme.com

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Now I don't know how I'd feel if someone invented a drumtar. :freak: Drummers would just look wrong if they stood up and walked around on stage, drumming on some tiny little electronic device or even into the air on virtual drums.

 

You mean, like Futureman?

 

http://walras.econ.duke.edu/wallpaper/futureman-2.jpg

Moe

---

 

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Oh, I remembered something else.

 

Anyone ever see an Ashbory bass guitar?

http://www.largesound.com/ashborytour/dearmond.jpg

 

They're about the size of a mandolin but they produce the same pitches as an upright bass (URB). Light and small, they would appear to be the bassist's dream come true. No more wondering how you're going to fit your URB into your Gremlin for tonight's gig! :D

 

Among bassists, though, they're more of a novelty. I don't know anyone that gigs with one regularly. (I'm sure after I've said that someone will show me someone that does.) They just don't feel like a bass. They're too small. And light. So bassists go on with their URBs and shoulder-denting, spine-bending bass guitars instead.

 

Is that another possible drawback to the keytar? It just doesn't feel like a keyboard?

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How would a guitarist react if they came out with a six string version of his axe which kind of looked like a pedal steel but only in a nice tolex keyboard like case? Would they embrace it or would they question why anyone would want to emulate a keyboard player when playing guitar?

 

Two different instruments, two differents worlds. Next thing you know cats and dogs will be living together...

Thanks, that's more the analogy I was looking for earlier.
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Key Tars, flexible keyboard stands, guitar straps on keyboards, military intelligence, Government Organization, Alone Together, Personal Computer, Silent Scream, Living Dead, Same Difference, Taped Live, Plastic Glasses, Tight Slacks, Peace Force, Pretty Ugly, Head Butt, Working Vacation, Tax Return, Virtual Reality, Dodge Ram, Work Party, Jumbo Shrimp, Healthy Tan, Microsoft Works.

 

"...we didn't start the fire..." :rawk:http://ed.coury.com/kys.gif

"Oh yeah, I've got two hands here." (Viv Savage)

"Mr. Blu... Mr. Blutarsky: Zero POINT zero." (Dean Vernon Wormer)

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Now I don't know how I'd feel if someone invented a drumtar. :freak: Drummers would just look wrong if they stood up and walked around on stage, drumming on some tiny little electronic device or even into the air on virtual drums.

 

You mean, like Futureman?

Wow, I gotta get out more often.

 

"The [drumitar] is one of a kind, and it was originally modified from a SynthAxe previously owned by jazz musician Lee Ritenour." (Wikipedia) I guess that explains why Lee doesn't play his SynthAxe anymore. :o

 

Speaking of the SynthAxe, it was an interesting attempt at giving guitarists their own MIDI controller. Imagine if all the cool sample libraries were available back when it came out (and it didn't cost $13,000).

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I guess someone should tell Keith to stop sticking knives in his Hammond, and sit there quietly, instead of doing that crazy rotating grand piano stunt, and all those other 'me too' parlour tricks he's known to pull out during a live show.

Yeah, just sitting there is where it's at...

 

What we record in life, echoes in eternity.

 

MOXF8, Electro 6D, XK1c, Motif XSr, PEKPER, Voyager, Univox MiniKorg.

https://www.abandoned-film.com

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