Jump to content


Please note: You can easily log in to MPN using your Facebook account!

Guitar Strap + Keyboard


UBERMENSCHIST

Recommended Posts

I would like to know if anybody has developed a technique in which they could strap a keyboard onto themselves like a guitar (without the strap getting in the way of the hands).

 

I've been using a guitar strap, but when I wear it like a "guitar hero", it gets in the way of my left hand and I have to awkwardly position my hand underneath the strap.

 

Are any products that can eliminate this problem for me?

 

I hate having to sit down *to play my music, and I hate keyboard stands.

 

I've been wearing my synthesizer like a utility belt and so far, it's worked but I have to be careful because it can fall (like a loose belt) and I don't want to break my keyboard.

Link to comment
Share on other sites



  • Replies 40
  • Created
  • Last Reply
Does anyone understand what I'm going through? :cry:

 

I understand the words you're saying, but I fail to comprehend what you're going through... sorry.

 

Oh, and I can't help but feel that this image is somehow pertinent:

 

http://www.svengolly.com/img/trollxing.gif

 

 

;):wave:

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

They can be quite exp;ressive, but I rarely have the luxury of being able to focus on only one part at a time, and combining that with the general unreliability of every model ever made from every manufacturer, alongside the premium on eBay due to their uniqueness, I have steered clear... thus far.

 

At the right price, adequate features and sensitivity (velocity, aftertouch, etc.), I would buy one in a flash. Not to look cool on stage, but because I know it would make me play differently, phrase differently, and maybe produce a better performance for certain types of patches (in the studio, if not at a gig).

 

I mentioned several times, by now long ago, how blown away I was when some kid came buy to buy an old Casio rack-mount synth from me that I had posted on Craigslist, and had such mastery of his Roland AX-7 that everything sounded so organic and fluid and expressive compared to what I was doing with that same module from the keyboard or even from my wind controller (Casio, like Yamaha, tended to set up separate voice banks for keyboard, guitar, and wind controller inputs).

 

Here is a wonderful site that discusses every keytar ever made -- though not in detail. Its main attribute is being a good single-sourcec lookup of what has been and/or is available:

 

http://www.vintagesynth.com/

 

That website does not support updating the URL once clicking on internal links, so the easiest way to find the page is to look at the list of recently added models and select the Roland AX-7.

 

As I also mentioned in a recent posting, the keyboardist in another local 80's band that I occasionally sub for (on bass, my main instrument), recently bought a used Yamaha keytar along with a CME WIDI breakout box. The Yammie comes in many colours but the one he found on eBay was painted to look like the DX7 (though it has no internal sounds, FM-based or otherwise).

 

The Yammie controller has one stuck key, a few chipped keys, and dodgy jacks, but other than for the CME WIDI box recycling a couple of times during the gig (quickly corrected but embarassing if during a lead solo), this setup worked great and the girls loved it :-). Probably the first time he ever got noticed at a gig :-).

Eugenio Upright, 60th Anniversary P-Bass, USA Geddy Lee J-Bass, Yamaha BBP35, D'angelico SS Bari, EXL1,

Select Strat, 70th Anniversary Esquire, LP 57, Eastman T486, T64, Ibanez PM2, Hammond XK4, Moog Voyager

Link to comment
Share on other sites

They can be quite exp;ressive, but I rarely have the luxury of being able to focus on only one part at a time, and combining that with the general unreliability of every model ever made from every manufacturer, alongside the premium on eBay due to their uniqueness, I have steered clear... thus far.

 

At the right price, adequate features and sensitivity (velocity, aftertouch, etc.), I would buy one in a flash. Not to look cool on stage, but because I know it would make me play differently, phrase differently, and maybe produce a better performance for certain types of patches (in the studio, if not at a gig).

 

I mentioned several times, by now long ago, how blown away I was when some kid came buy to buy an old Casio rack-mount synth from me that I had posted on Craigslist, and had such mastery of his Roland AX-7 that everything sounded so organic and fluid and expressive compared to what I was doing with that same module from the keyboard or even from my wind controller (Casio, like Yamaha, tended to set up separate voice banks for keyboard, guitar, and wind controller inputs).

 

Here is a wonderful site that discusses every keytar ever made -- though not in detail. Its main attribute is being a good single-sourcec lookup of what has been and/or is available:

 

http://www.vintagesynth.com/

 

That website does not support updating the URL once clicking on internal links, so the easiest way to find the page is to look at the list of recently added models and select the Roland AX-7.

 

As I also mentioned in a recent posting, the keyboardist in another local 80's band that I occasionally sub for (on bass, my main instrument), recently bought a used Yamaha keytar along with a CME WIDI breakout box. The Yammie comes in many colours but the one he found on eBay was painted to look like the DX7 (though it has no internal sounds, FM-based or otherwise).

 

The Yammie controller has one stuck key, a few chipped keys, and dodgy jacks, but other than for the CME WIDI box recycling a couple of times during the gig (quickly corrected but embarassing if during a lead solo), this setup worked great and the girls loved it :-). Probably the first time he ever got noticed at a gig :-).

 

Thank You for the useful response! :thu:

 

It seems as though keytars are only capable of being played with one hand (I would like to use two); besides what would be the difference between a keytar (strapped to your back) and a normal synth?

 

I'm thinking about modifying an alesis micron by adding on "strap buttons" but then my dilemna resurfaces because it's difficult to play with the strap in the way.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Generally, around here ... remote keyboards (I prefer that to the guitaristic term keytar) are somewhat less than popular ... mostly because they make you look like a guitarist wannabee, I guess. However some good players have used them upon occasion ...

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V0hKMdFaU-A

 

 

Hammer uses a Lync.

 

Jordan Rudess (playing second fiddle to Jan in the above videos) has been seen carrying a Zen Riffer around recently ...

 

 

 

Jerry

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yeah, that link isn't complete after all, as I had forgotten about the Liberator myself.

 

Until seeing that page though, I didn't know that Jan Hammer had used the Lync, so that was news to me when I found that keytar listing a few days ago. I guess I simply didn't know what he used as I'd never seen him live.

 

Maybe in the 70's he used the Liberator? But there was no MIDI yet, so was it even possible (or safe) to do a remote keyboard using C/V cabling? Or was there a keytar that had sounds?

Eugenio Upright, 60th Anniversary P-Bass, USA Geddy Lee J-Bass, Yamaha BBP35, D'angelico SS Bari, EXL1,

Select Strat, 70th Anniversary Esquire, LP 57, Eastman T486, T64, Ibanez PM2, Hammond XK4, Moog Voyager

Link to comment
Share on other sites

AFAIK, Jan Hammer was intimately involved in the Lync, it may have even been built to his specifications.

 

The first keytar I can remember is Gary Wright's Minimoog, simply cut into 2 cabinets and the wiring from keyboard to synth just run down a long snake.

 

 

Moe

---

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I hope this isn't considered off topic but I was hoping someone could advise me how to proceed with an idea I had for taking a two tiered keyboard stand and afixing a guitar perpendicular to the floor on each tier so I can sit down and play both. I'm sure no one has ever done that. What do you think?
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Looks like Edgar Winter did something similar with his ARP 2600:

 

 

I've seen that video before, and I always find it incredibly self-indulgent. It's like Edgar Winter is saying, "Look how many instruments I can play! Synth! Sax! Drums! Impressive, huh!" Admittedly, it is impressive, but still . . .

 

Also, Uber: What you're describing (having to tuck your left arm under the strap to play your keyboard standing up) is really no different than the way, say, a lap steel guitar player has to play his guitar if standing. For a recent pop culture example, check out the lap steel player in The Clark Brothers on "The Next Great American Band" on Fox. There's no other "solution" to your problem.

 

Of course, it would be irresponsible of me not to encourage you (as others have done in their own way) to abandon this idea of playing your synth like a guitar. It demeans our instrument and "elevates" the guitar (and guitarists don't need any help feeling better about themselves). If you think it's cooler to stand in front of a crowd with an instrument slung over your shoulder, then learn how to play guitar or bass. In the meantime, play your keyboard the way it's meant to be played (on a stand).

 

My two cents,

Noah

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Looks like Edgar Winter did something similar with his ARP 2600:

 

I've seen that video before, and I always find it incredibly self-indulgent.

 

I do too. It's why I never bothered with remote keyboards. Some people think it's an age thing. i.e. when you are certain age, you associate coming to the front of the stage with importance.

 

But several keyboard anchored bands have keyboardists who sit and play and lead. It's the music that matters.

 

Jerry

Link to comment
Share on other sites

But several keyboard anchored bands have keyboardists who sit and play and lead. It's the music that matters.

Jerry

+1 :thu:

 

Maybe I'm way too partial to our instrument. I've always thought a cat sitting down and/or standing behind a rig and playing some killer stuff was cool. :)

 

Having to step out front with a strap-on just seems lame and ghey. :laugh::cool:

 

 

PD

 

"The greatest thing you'll ever learn, is just to love and be loved in return."--E. Ahbez "Nature Boy"

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've always thought it would be possible to construct some kind of rig with two small keyboards (micron size), mounted at a "V" angle (kind of like those ergonomic computer keboards). Of course, this would require some kind of shoulder and torso mounting sceme. Probably more work than it's worth.

 

Other random keytar musings:

The bass player for Oingo Boingo used to play a Lyncs(sp?) keytar for the bass line on "Dead Man's Party." He held it sidways against his body, an his left hand reached around and played they lower notes backwards.

Jimmy Jam and Terry Lewis had trenchcoats, which helped the cool factor.

If anyone watched "Flight of the Conchords" on HBO, there was a hillarious episode with a keytar. One of the band members brought a keyboard player to meet the manager, suggesting that he join the band. The manager was so confused about the keytar he was carrying - is it a guitar? Is it a keyboard? It's just going to be confusing to the audience. No, I don't like it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If anyone watched "Flight of the Conchords" on HBO, there was a hillarious episode with a keytar. One of the band members brought a keyboard player to meet the manager, suggesting that he join the band. The manager was so confused about the keytar he was carrying - is it a guitar? Is it a keyboard? It's just going to be confusing to the audience. No, I don't like it.

 

Love that show (and that episode).

 

Noah

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...