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Acoustic Feedback


DavidMPires

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Man last night's practice was good but had such a bad moment, I travelled through london on the tube with two bass during the day and when it came the time to play my new acoustic bass, Wish you were here by pink floyd... MAN that feeback is nasty. I didn't had the time to mess about cos we only have another practice until the next gig and we were sounding sloppy at times. Anyway how can I decrease the feedback???

 

www.myspace.com/davidbassportugal

 

"And then the magical unicorn will come prancing down the rainbow and we'll all join hands for a rousing chorus of Kumbaya." - by davio

 

 

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Very quick solution - tape an old CD over the soundhole.

 

You can also get 'lids' which are a close fit in the soundhole (Soundbusters), but old CDs are free.....

 

:)

 

G.

"When the power of love overcomes the love of power the World will know Peace": Jimi Hendrix

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The Geoff - blame Caevan!!!

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Anyway how can I decrease the feedback???

 

You get yourself a FeedbackBuster which would cost about £7.50 and consists of a soft rubber pad which you wedge into the soundhole. Kills most feedback dead, unless you WANT the feedback.

 

Otherwise, you can remove feedback with specialized EQ pedals which cost a lot more but remove certain frequencies from your sound. But the feedback buster is the first choice.

 

Otherwise, you can go for that old 70s solution and stick a large beach-towel in the soundbox. It's all good.

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I was trying to cut through a drum kit and two guitars, that's why it was loud, I'll be ordering one of those together with the strings, they have them at strings direct at £8.49

 

www.myspace.com/davidbassportugal

 

"And then the magical unicorn will come prancing down the rainbow and we'll all join hands for a rousing chorus of Kumbaya." - by davio

 

 

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Feedback issues with ABGs CAN be handled somewhat via feedback busters. But the cause of these issues are really the resoanat freq of the top of the bass creating a loop with the amplified sound--and not so much the sound emitted thru the soundhole.

The low end howl is often not contained by a feedback buster.

 

Not sure how a CD would work as that would actually enhance(or perhaps raise) the resonant freq---causing more of a problem.

 

It is quite helpful to find a good parametric eq which can notch out the freq which is causing the feedback. Often, rolling off the bass slider on the onboard preamp can be a big help as well.

 

And...the biggest help is finding the place where those freqs are less prone. Amp placement is very important, and have your amp behind you is a recipe for trouble. Placing the amp off to the side is better. And while your at it, you will want to eq things quite differently than with a "slab" bass; watch those lows....

 

Max

...it's not the arrow, it's the Indian.
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The device is called a Notch Filter and one is built into the preamp on my AE. I believe it is a band pass type of gizmo but it works amazingly well even when playing at full volume with a drum kit. Pretty sure you can pick them up reasonably cheap.

"He is to music what Stevie Wonder is to photography." getz76

 

I have nothing nice to say so . . .

 

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Our g**t*r player was using his Acoustic last night and was getting a very loud hum through the amp when not playing. The moment he muted the strings it stopped, it this the type of feedback ya'll are talking about???

Rocky

"Democracy is two wolves and a lamb, voting on what to eat for lunch. Liberty is a well-armed lamb, contesting the vote."

Benjamin Franklin

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No, Rocky. We're talking about honest to god FEEDBACK, wave upon screeching, howling wave of it. :D

 

I agree with what Max said, FeedbackBusters don't kill ALL the feedback. That's why I said that it kills feedback unless you WANT feedback, in which case you can stand directly in front of the amp and the feedback buster won't help you much there.

 

Like thusly...

http://i66.photobucket.com/albums/h272/kramer_ferrington_iii/_MG_5316.jpg

 

Standing to the side of the amp usually helps, and if the FOH guy is going to mike up your amp anyway, you have a lot more freedom in how you position it.

 

One more thing about FeedbackBusters, some guitarists have complained that it dulls down the instruments tone, but with bass, where a nice solid "thump" is often desired, this shouldn't be a problem.

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Nope, Rocky...not that kinda feedback (see Kramer's post for a nice example of what is being discussed.....)

 

What your gtrist seems to have is a grounding issue. Typically, piezo pickups do not require grounding...but mag soundhole pickups do (just curious if you know what he was using...) If there is a ground hum with a piezos, chance are there is something keenly amiss in the preamp.

If it is with magneyic pickups, then often reversing the polarity of the mains or lifting the ground on the amp can rectify the hum.....

 

Max

...it's not the arrow, it's the Indian.
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I would like to point out that if you are using an ABG...or for that matter an acoustic gtr...it is quite doubtful the FOH/engineer would opt to mic your amp (unless he is just one crazy, twisted sonofa...). Chances are you will go straight into a DI pre everything just so that when the feedback howls it is limited to the stage mix and not causing the impressionable minds of your audience to explode......

 

Max

...it's not the arrow, it's the Indian.
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Chances are you will go straight into a DI pre everything just so that when the feedback howls it is limited to the stage mix and not causing the impressionable minds of your audience to explode......

 

Max

 

True dat. Which mean you have even more freedom to place your amp where you will.

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My band mates almost explode during a chorus the feedback raised so fast that was shaking the walls, was impressive.

 

www.myspace.com/davidbassportugal

 

"And then the magical unicorn will come prancing down the rainbow and we'll all join hands for a rousing chorus of Kumbaya." - by davio

 

 

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We have a song that's built around this brooding e-minor chord and then, when the song is at the top of a crescendo, I let go with a long screech of feedback, and then just do stuff with the feedback like swing the bass slowly back and forth across the front of the amp so the feedback comes in waves. It's quite a nice effect. I've always loved feedback.
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See, this is why God made Leo Fender, to invent solid-body electric guitars and basses so we can play at higher volumes without our amplifier howling like a raped ape.

 

Not a rhetorical question: What (besides weight, maybe, and that's a real consideration for some of us) would you see as the advantage of using an ABG on a rock tune?

 

 

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Not a rhetorical question: What (besides weight, maybe, and that's a real consideration for some of us) would you see as the advantage of using an ABG on a rock tune?

 

And now a PRACTICAL question ;) What's "rock", Chad?

 

 

And, seeing as you asked, I brought my ABG to my audition simply because I liked the neck. I tried to use my electric one evening, but the wiring in our practise room is not terribly good and I kept getting electrical hums that drove me crazy and I never brought the electric again.

 

If I had to have a real reason, I'd say that I like the sound. It's richer than an electric's and it adds a nice colour to the sound. Oh, and I like the neck, too.

 

And as I always say when asked, "I can fake an alectric sound from an ABG, but I can't do the opposite with a solid body".

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And now a PRACTICAL question What's "rock", Chad?

Fair enough. Well, I guess I'd think of "Wish You Were Here" as a rock tune. DavidMPires was playing with 2 gtrs. and drums and it was loud. Sounds rock-ish to me.

 

But my question really was not meant to criticize anybody's choice; I myself am not able to see a reason to use an ABG in a high-volume situation and was genuinely curious.

 

 

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But my question really was not meant to criticize anybody's choice; I myself am not able to see a reason to use an ABG in a high-volume situation and was genuinely curious.

 

Well, perhaps I've been lucky because I'm in a three-piece, with a rather mild-mannered drummer, so I've never come away from rehearsals with ringing ears. Moral of the story: I don't have to crank up very much.

 

My question about "what is rock"? was only mildly silly, I mean, "rock" these days is pretty much anything with electric guitars, or not. I mean, were the Violent Femmes a rock band?

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After many years of playing a variety of solid body basses, I found "my voice" with acoustics. TRhe problem was their bulkiness (I was, a different times playing Taylor, Washburn and MArtin ABGs) and that nasty feedback issue. This was rectified by moving to thin-body, semi-acoustics; first Godin and now Rick Turner.

 

For me, and I might think this true of anyone who uses acoustic or semi-acoustic basses primarily (as I have heard this same sort of insight from Jonas Hellborg,Brian Ritchie, Steve Swallow and Jack Casady...), I think it has to do with hearing a sound which closely axproximates the "sound in your head". For many that sound is an passive PU solidbody four string; for others an active PU solid five or six string....or a fretless. The rather complex tone and dynamic response of an acoustic instrument is that "sound in my head". Once I went to acoustics, it was hard to ever go back (in fact, these days I only play my Turner freteed and fretless semi-acoustics...).

 

A few years back I did a tur with Michael Manring and we became quite good friends. He paid me one of the highest compliments I had ever recieved when he told me that the sound of the acoustic bass guitar (and at that time I was playing a Godin A4) was so clearly "my voice"; that the tone of the acoustic bass and my playing style were so completely intetwined they were complete and inseperable. He told me what a unique and rare thing that was...and something he rarely heard in players.

 

That really touched me. These days I play a fretted four string Turner 90% of the time...with the fretless picked up when "that" sound is neccessitated. Everything from jazz, rock blues, counrty, funk...and of course my solo bass performances. I have other basses...and I feel badly they don't get out much anymore.....

 

Max

...it's not the arrow, it's the Indian.
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Just back from a three song showcase on the ABG. I played a Camden club/bar with singer James Harris. The bass was fine. I used a borrowed Line 6 combo and the PA but the band was small indeed.

 

We played three originals: one soul tune about Myspace based on the chords from Wonderful World by Sam Cooke and a couple of reggae tunes. The first was just bass and voice and on the last couple we were joined by drums and congas and managed to boost the bass volume without feedback although I had to be careful which way I was facing.

 

I wasn't expecting it to be just bass and voice and two of those tunes I'd only learned that day. On the last tune the singer forgot the worlds and ran off stage - leaving me to play a 3 minute bass solo over the reggae groove. That was fun! A guy in the audience complimented my island bass lines so I was happy.

 

I was surprised how little problem the feedback was.

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