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Clapton on a Gibson


mdrs

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Does he sound different on a Gibby?? Better than his "Strat tone"?

 

Eric playing a Gibby;

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q3wX1wn-0go

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=apeu0am5LZQ&mode=related&search=

 

Eric playing a Strat;

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZiOuHnbd8xc&mode=related&search=

 

What do you think?

 

 

 

 

Don

 

"There once was a note, Pure and Easy. Playing so free, like a breath rippling by."

 

 

http://www.soundclick.com/bands/pagemusic.cfm?bandID=574296

 

http://www.myspace.com/imdrs

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I've heard him on several Gibsons, LP, SGs but he makes that 335 sing the Blues. I think on pure old blues he sounds better on the 335.

 

When is is just blues progression rock, the Strat had the Gibson beat. You have to remember his strats all have that Martin V neck and he is a part of that guitar. The Gibson isn't related to him in the same way. Sounds strange but if you think about it, it makes sense.

 

Peace

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I don't know why he ever stopped playing the 335 on a regular basis.

 

Possibly because Fender offers a variety of necks, pickups, bridges, etc. A Strat's gotta be easier to tweak to your liking than a 335. Your own Strat is unlike the majority hanging in shops. All 335's have much more in common.

 

A Strat or Stratlike guitar would always be onstage with me, the Gibbys making cameo appearances when their sonic richness is desired, but nothing covers the bases like a good Strat.

Never a DUH! moment! Well, almost never. OK, OK! Sometimes never!
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He holds the Strat lower than the 335, but seems extremely fluid and comfortable on both. Ya can play a Strat from the hip, but ya gotta be more wrapped around the 335.
Never a DUH! moment! Well, almost never. OK, OK! Sometimes never!
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Sounds a lot like B.B. King on that axe. IIRC, Clapton played an SG with Cream and Jimmy Page played a Tele on some of the early Zep.

 

It's the fingers on the frets, not the hardware beneath them in those cases.

He not busy being born

Is busy dyin'.

 

...Bob Dylan

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Na.... It actually sounds like Page is playing a Tele on the early stuff. It's so thin and busted when driven hard at high gain. Not at all like a humB unless it was substancially processed.

 

 

Interesting thread just because I was watching a Hendrix DVD I picked up the other day ahd he's playing what looks like an early 60s LP Custom (SG body) white, triple pickup.... playin' what.... Clapton!

Lost, convoluted and random at best but an interesting experience.

 

 

I still think guitars are like shoes, but louder.

 

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EC used a Les Paul on the first Cream record, and an SG and a Les Paul Custom for Disraeli Gears. The way I always heard it, was that EC became tired of the endless jamming (and insane volume) of Cream, and soon after, became enamored with The Band. Then it was bye-bye Woman Tone, hello Lay Down Sally!
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Clapton + Les Paul, SG, ES-335= GOD

 

Clapton + Strat= Blehhhhhh

 

edit: oh, wait, I just saw the "God" thing.... then NOT +1. But he sounds, to my ears, much better on the Gibsons than on a Strat.

"Without music, life would be a mistake."

--from 'Beyond Good and Evil', by Friedrich Nietzsche

 

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How does he get that woman tone?

 

 

The "woman tone" is the informal term used by guitarists to refer to Eric Clapton's distinctive mid- to late-1960s electric guitar sound, created using his Gibson SG solidbody guitar (with humbucking pickups) and a Marshall tube (valve) amplifier. It is an overdriven, distorted sound that is articulate yet thick. Many players have tried to duplicate it, usually without success, in part because Clapton's playing technique also plays a significant part in the tone, and in part because it requires amplifiers run very loud to achieve.

 

Among the techniques used to replicate Clapton's sound is a technique by which the amplifier's volume is turned up to full, while the guitar's tone knob is turned down to zero. (one of the knobs on most electric guitars)

 

Perhaps the best examples of the "woman tone" are Clapton's famous riff and solo from his band Cream's 1967 hit "Sunshine of Your Love." Clapton has explained that he obtained the tone with his Gibson's tone control rolled all the way down, switching to the neck pickup (closest to the fretboard) and the volume all the way up, with his amplifier also turned up. The treble, mids and bass controls on the amplifier were also maxed out. Some versions of the "woman tone" may also have involved strategic positioning of Clapton's wah-wah pedal

 

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People are always talking about this Woman tone like it's difficult to get, but it's so easy!

 

Marshall at high gain + SG (or LP, probably) + Neck pickup with volume all the way up, and tone all the way down = Woman Tone

 

I definitely agree with tone being in the hands, coming from the player etc... but a Strat cannot sound like an SG, and an SG cannot sound like a Strat.

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I definitely agree with tone being in the hands, coming from the player etc... but a Strat cannot sound like an SG, and an SG cannot sound like a Strat.

 

I'm a strat lover, the one I have had some mods like the possibility to have the bridge in series with everything else you can get with your switch and I can also invert the phase of the neck pick up. There are some tones I can get that are very different from the strat standard ones, although I have all the standard ones available.

 

I found a combination that sounds very "gibsonic" to my ears and it somehow ricreates some SG nuamces, it just uses plain strat settings, without any mod.. It's a sort of woman's tone, presence is set at maximum on my jcm2000-tsl100 and the middle p.up is set with the tone all down and mixed with the bridge. There is a very strong singing quality in this combination and some sort of slow boost in the decay, as the richer harmonics of the bridge slowly emerge because the highs-cut middle p.up decays a bit faster.

 

Another combination that brings a gibsonic quality is the clean sound of the in series bridge combination with the neck...you would swear you're hearing some heavy mahogany seriousness there, a robust and authoritative fripp-like clean tone.

Then, if you invert the neck and add some saturation you immediatly shift to a tele sound, the lightness of the "out of phase" compensated by the in series connection, with plenty of quack, almost a sort of natural wah....

 

My strat is not a factory one though...the marvellous p.ups come from a 78-9 original model which had an unbearably heavy ash body and a damaged all maple neck. Now it has an "Allparts" alder body that I finished with shellac and a fantastic bird-eye maple neck with ebony fretboard. I also mounted a new Fender vintage type "tremolo" bridge but only with the 2 external screws...it sounds and floats infinitely better than with all 6 screws.

 

I'm a happy camper with this one. :)

Guess the Amp

.... now it's finished...

Here it is!

 

 

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I was forunate to get to see him play that 335 and that SG back in the day and I'll have to say, I am still partial to that Gibson sound. Also the Les Paul sound with the Bluesbreakers. There's nothing wrong with the Strat,I have one too, but it's the Eric/Gibson combo I like the best.

Here's a good clip some of you might get a kick out of.

 

Eric Clapton & his Gibson SG (1968)

 

Les Paul Studio Deluxe, '74 Guild S100, '64 Strat, JCM 900 Combo, Peavey Classic 30 1x12, Peavey Classic 30 Head, CBG
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