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Taking care of gear - do you?


Rod S

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Ever feel you're the exception as far as taking care of your gear??? It doesn't fail to impress me - how many people do NOT take care of their equipment.

 

I had an offer a while back to trade an equipment. When I went to the guy's house to check it out, the piece he wanted to trade was full of scratches, a few dents, a mal-functioning button (This was < 3 year old gear...). No manual, no original power supply ("I lost it..")

 

This guy was the original owner, and never took it to gigs or anything, just to other people's houses...

 

What the hell? Unfortunately this guy seems to be more than rule than the exception. I remember a guitar player I use to play with, after the gig he would stuff everything into his backpack, cable, pedals, etc. No wonder the stuff would fail sometimes! I don't know how many times we were late getting started or had to stop midway because something mal functioned.

 

I can understand gear that's out of the road a lot - but I know a lot of people that are hobby musicians, so this is no excuse (or maybe it is - if they actually need it for their 'dayjob' they might take better care of it).

 

Every piece of gear (that i was the original owner) is impecable. I just sold my QSR, and all it had was a few scratches on the side from installing in the rack - I had all the original documentation to it, original power supply, even the CD ROM that came with it.

 

The guy in california that bought my Kawai K1 looked at it for about 5 minutes in disbelief. He couldn't believe that a 11 year old synth could still look like that.

 

I gave up buying anything on something like Ebay because of that - pictures don't always tell you everything.

 

Granted, there's exceptions. I caught up with a friend-of-friend a fews week, went to check out his home studio, and was surprised how impecable his stuff was. The stuff that wasn't, well - guess what - he had bought second hand.

 

It really amazes me. You put that much money into it, you need to work at critical times, but you don't care of it.

 

Do you guys have similar experiences?

Korg Kronos X73 / ARP Odyssey / Motif ES Rack / Roland D-05 / JP-08 / SE-05 / Jupiter Xm / Novation Mininova / NL2X / Waldorf Pulse II

MBP-LOGIC

American Deluxe P-Bass, Yamaha RBX760

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As someone who keeps everything in like new condition, I too find it disheartening whenever I stumble upon a piece of gear, especially keyboards, that is beat up, missing knobs, faders, sliders, broken keys, cracked screen, dirty, etc.

 

Granted, an instrument can get worn out by normal wear and tear but how difficult is it really to have it repaired?

 

I refuse to accept the excuse that a worn out piece of gear denotes a "serious" musician. A raggedy instrument would let me know that particular individual cannot play mine.

 

I have bought, sold and traded a lot of equipment. I have personally never run into a deal where the gear was in bad shape. I'd like to think "most" musicians take care of their gear.

 

However, I have played with musicians who refuse to buy a keyboard case or stand. I've seen "newer" model boards in bad shape. This tells me that there are some who could give a care less about their equipment. That is sad. :cool:

 

 

PD

 

"The greatest thing you'll ever learn, is just to love and be loved in return."--E. Ahbez "Nature Boy"

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I take great care of my gear. I won't settle for moving it in anything but the best ATA flight cases. The only area in which I am a bit lax is in cleaning it. My gear builds up a bit of muck and dust, primarily on the panel (the keys stay clean from playing them). I will do about a 1-2x per year cleaning, but usually don't sweat the panel dust too much.

 

You can tell from this recent photo of my rig after I added some boutique wooden end cheeks to my S90...the panel is just a tad bit dusty. But that S90 chassis has always been a dust magnet and not the easiest thing to clean, being kind of a matte/grainy finish. The S90ES panel is more of a gloss finish and probably shines up a bit easier.

 

http://mywebpages.comcast.net/eslawson/old_faithful_2.JPG

 

There was a time in my heavier touring days that my gear was really getting sweaty and gross from 20 nights a month of gigs in all sorts of indoor/outdoor/rainy/sunny/hot climates. It was always rewarding to see that things would actually power on and work in those days!

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I, too, take very good care of my gear, but I've always felt that that's somewhat of a liability of being a keyboardist, since our equipment is so sensitive. After all, having pristine gear isn't very "rock and roll." (Ever seen Clapton's guitar?)

 

Noah

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I learned a lesson with my Ensoniq KS32. I never wiped it down and the sweat and spit from singing and maybe too many beers has left it in rough condition. Lots of flaking paint and some rust.

 

Now every night I wipe down my gear as I put it into the flight cases. I will not transport my good gear without portective cases and always clean it well.

Jimmy

 

Those are my principles, and if you don't like them... well, I have others. Groucho

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I too keep covers on my 'boards when I"m not playing them, have all the original manuals, etc. I'm like that with everything.

 

We briefly had a guitar player in our band that the first few times he came over, had all his MXR pedals wrapped in the little plastic baggies in the original boxes! When he saw the other guitar player's pedal board, said, "hey, that's a good idea." It was a relief to see him cut down on his set up/tear down time with his own.

"I'm so crazy, I don't know this is impossible! Hoo hoo!" - Daffy Duck

 

"The good news is that once you start piano you never have to worry about getting laid again. More time to practice!" - MOI

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I work with a Bass player who is an extremist when it comes to taking care of his gear. He bought a top of the line anvil flight case for his Ampeg head. Once he puts it in the flight case he then wraps the flight case in towels. He then puts the wrapped case into a cardboard box filled with bubble wrap.

He is even that way with his tuner. It goes in bubble wrap, then into a box, the box gets wrapped with towels and then put into another box which then goes into a case.

I normally wouldn't care what people do but in his case we are always late setting up and tearing down waiting on this guy.

 

 

Steve

A Lifetime of Peace, Love and Protest Music

www.rock-xtreme.com

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Some people call those examples 'anal'. I don't particulary care for that word because it reminds me of the physical I need to schedule. :rolleyes:

 

I'll cover my keyboard when I put it in the SKB case so the foam in the lid doesn't rub against the LCD and scratch it. And I'll cover the keyboard when it's in my studio after I'm finished playing it. I left my window open the other day... here in Raleigh we've got pine pollen falling so thick, it looks like yellow snow. For those who suffer from allergies, they're miserable. Anyway, I don't want those microscopic pores anywhere near my electronics. It probably wouldn't hurt them, but I try to keep the dust out anyway.

 

We had a similar discussion here some months ago. Someone said that dirt/dust wasn't a big factor in screwing up electronics. Well, I stand by my opinion that it is. Smoke is also nasty stuff. It covers integrated circuits and helps to heat them up. Heat is not good for electronics.

 

OK, OK... on the list - closer to the top of the list of things that screw up electronics would be sea mist. If you've ever owned a boat, you know what I'm talking about. Anything near the water - especially salt water or brackish water - will be corroded eventually.

 

Beer is made of lots of water. Spilling beer on your keyboard has got to be pretty near the top of the list.

 

We mentioned cat urine. Let's not talk about it again. :mad:

 

And drummers.

 

Drummers will usually be the ones that will help you schlep your gear from the van to the stage. Unfortunately, they're often heavy-handed. Yeah. So drummers tear up stuff. Especially if it's not in an Avil Case that's been certified safe for aviation purposes and baggage handlers. ;)

 

Babies, puppies, anything that can throw up on your equipment should be near the top of the list.

 

Angry wives... Yeah. :rolleyes: It's one of the first things they'll attack when they want to get even.

 

Floods. I've lost a Wurly EP and a Fender Rhodes to Hurricane Floyd.

 

Knives - Keith Emerson. 'nuf said.

 

Groupies that wander on stage... Not good.

 

Bad drivers of the equipment van.

 

Heights. See above - Drummers unloading/schlepping your equipment. They'll drop it.

 

I could go on and on. The point is that no matter how much we try to keep our equipment looking new, Murphy's law prevails.

 

Yeah, 'anal' may be the right word to describe how we ought to be. But I really don't like it. :rolleyes:

 

 

:snax:

 

 

 

 

 

 

"Music expresses that which cannot be put into words and that which cannot remain silent." - Victor Hugo
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OK, OK... on the list - closer to the top of the list of things that screw up electronics would be sea mist. If you've ever owned a boat, you know what I'm talking about. Anything near the water - especially salt water or brackish water - will be corroded eventually.

 

Ditto to that. I had that problem in Rio - big time. I was living (and my parents still do) near the ocean (they are only about 500 meters in land, I was a bit further in but didn't make that much of a difference), and it's cruel on eletronics. This is by far the worst problem I've encountered. When you walk near the ocean, by the time you're done there's a layer of salt on your skin, you obviously can't see it but you can feel it, your skin feels all mucky.

 

I agree there's such a thing as being too anal, but I don't see the big deal on taking minimum precautions - and that's the part that bugs me. The story of the bass player was pretty funny. I still rather deal with a guy like this than the guitar player I mentioned before - I never could understand why it was so hard to roll the cables individually and protect the pedals.

 

Going back to Tom's post, we had a topic on another forum (Synth-Brasil) where people were talking about their experiences of gears being wrecked in car accidents going and returning to gigs. I guess this is more common that I can imagine. I almost got rear ended with my pc88mx in the trunk of my car a few years back, and it would certainly have ruined the board. The flight case was wedged between the passenger seat and the end of the trunk (hatchback with seats folded down), any deformation of the chassis would have been absorved by the board...

Korg Kronos X73 / ARP Odyssey / Motif ES Rack / Roland D-05 / JP-08 / SE-05 / Jupiter Xm / Novation Mininova / NL2X / Waldorf Pulse II

MBP-LOGIC

American Deluxe P-Bass, Yamaha RBX760

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I, too, take very good care of my gear, but I've always felt that that's somewhat of a liability of being a keyboardist, since our equipment is so sensitive. After all, having pristine gear isn't very "rock and roll." (Ever seen Clapton's guitar?) Noah

 

Yeah, but not everyone has backup guitars handy and a nearby tech :P

 

At another job we had a saying "If you have only one, you have none" - for any equipment or vehicle critical to the operation, we had at least 2. If you have one, you're S.O.L. if anything happens to it. (To my disbelief, they applied that rule to a a million dollar vehicle that was used for a critical operation - we got the approval to buy two of them!)

 

My point is, if you don't have the luxury of spares, you're better take good care of it or that equipment can fail on you.

Korg Kronos X73 / ARP Odyssey / Motif ES Rack / Roland D-05 / JP-08 / SE-05 / Jupiter Xm / Novation Mininova / NL2X / Waldorf Pulse II

MBP-LOGIC

American Deluxe P-Bass, Yamaha RBX760

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I use flight cases for everything and move it all myself. I also insist on moving everything myself as well.

 

 

No guitarists were harmed during the making of this message.

 

In general, harmonic complexity is inversely proportional to the ratio between chording and non-chording instruments.

 

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I use flight cases for everything and move it all myself. I also insist on moving everything myself as well.

 

 

When I gigged I moved everything myself as well. I didn't want to leave anything to chance. Generally others won't care for your gear the way you will.

Begin the day with a friendly voice A companion, unobtrusive

- Rush

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I use flight cases for everything and move it all myself. I also insist on moving everything myself as well.

 

 

When I gigged I moved everything myself as well. I didn't want to leave anything to chance. Generally others won't care for your gear the way you will.

Not only that, but if anything does get broken, there's only one person to blame.

 

I'll admit, I don't treat my gear with kid gloves. I don't abuse it or anything, but if it gets dinged while I'm setting up I'm not going to be bothered - it's a tool, not a person.

A ROMpler is just a polyphonic turntable.
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I have had more than one visitor remark at how new my vintage stuff looks.

 

 

If you make it a point to take care of your gear, is there any better compliment someone can give? well I guess an attractive female saying some other magical words may top it. :grin:

 

 

 

Begin the day with a friendly voice A companion, unobtrusive

- Rush

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The one time I didn't move my own gear the next day I opened the case, and my piano had 2 broken keys. I had to superglue them back together so I could get through the next few gigs. It was a happy day when the replacements came, and I could make her whole again. I've since invested in a much better case, and an am very picky who, if anybody, helps me move. Tonight I have to go up and down stairs, so I might just try to elicit some help. But only for certain items.

 

"In the beginning, Adam had the blues, 'cause he was lonesome.

So God helped him and created woman.

 

Now everybody's got the blues."

 

Willie Dixon

 

 

 

 

 

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I use flight cases for everything and move it all myself. I also insist on moving everything myself as well.

 

 

When I gigged I moved everything myself as well. I didn't want to leave anything to chance. Generally others won't care for your gear the way you will.

Not only that, but if anything does get broken, there's only one person to blame.

 

I'll admit, I don't treat my gear with kid gloves. I don't abuse it or anything, but if it gets dinged while I'm setting up I'm not going to be bothered - it's a tool, not a person.

 

My gear has a ding or two, but then again, so do I.

 

"In the beginning, Adam had the blues, 'cause he was lonesome.

So God helped him and created woman.

 

Now everybody's got the blues."

 

Willie Dixon

 

 

 

 

 

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My gear has a ding or two, but then again, so do I.

 

:eek:

 

I'm not touching that. :cool:

 

Of course, that's what SHE said. :rolleyes:

 

WWSS? (What would Sven Say?) :blush:

 

 

 

 

"Music expresses that which cannot be put into words and that which cannot remain silent." - Victor Hugo
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My gear has a ding or two, but then again, so do I.

 

:eek:

 

I'm not touching that. :cool:

 

Of course, that's what SHE said. :rolleyes:

 

WWSS? (What would Sven Say?) :blush:

 

 

 

 

And just how far in the gutter is YOUR mind today? :grin: :wave:

 

 

"In the beginning, Adam had the blues, 'cause he was lonesome.

So God helped him and created woman.

 

Now everybody's got the blues."

 

Willie Dixon

 

 

 

 

 

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And just how far in the gutter is YOUR mind today? :grin: :wave:

 

 

Ummmmm... Television. I've been watching too much television. Must get out more... :rolleyes:

 

 

"Music expresses that which cannot be put into words and that which cannot remain silent." - Victor Hugo
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I used to carry an K2500XS around in an SKB case. That combo was close to 100 lbs. During the gigs, someone among my band of brothers would help me to carry it.

 

I had to deal with it solo between getting in and out of the house, truck, to and from rehearsals and gigs.

 

To this day, I still carry an 88-note weighted board with no complaints. Got the weight down to about 60 lbs.

 

So far, my boards have not suffered one ding. :cool:

 

 

PD

 

"The greatest thing you'll ever learn, is just to love and be loved in return."--E. Ahbez "Nature Boy"

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I remember seeing a Moog Source that someone on the OTHER forum bought off Ebay. Paid something like 350 bucks for it. He was going to recondition it. It looked like it had been stored in an auto mechanics garage for about 20 years. Broken keys, all scratched up, in dismal condition. Personally, I wouldn't have bought it at all.

 

Most of my vintage gear looks almost as good as the day I bought it. I kept everything in flight cases and tried to take reasonably good care of my instruments. There's only incidental scratches on the bottom of some of my keys from being placed on KB stands.

 

I've worn some of the paint off the stripe around my Prophet 5's wheels, and also wore out the KB bushings from playing it the last 25 years. But I'd say I got my money's worth out of my Prophet!!

 

Mike T.

Yamaha Motif ES8, Alesis Ion, Prophet 5 Rev 3.2, 1979 Rhodes Mark 1 Suitcase 73 Piano, Arp Odyssey Md III, Roland R-70 Drum Machine, Digitech Vocalist Live Pro. Roland Boss Chorus Ensemble CE-1.

 

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I wish I had it together like some people here. I have never sold a piece a gear, by the time I get done with it it's always scratched in some way, or been dropped or damaged. I've been gigging since 1989. Was full time on a ship from 93-2001, full time 4-5 days aweek till a year ago, now I have a day job but still gig 2-4 days a week, every week. I always put my stuff in cases, but there's things like keyboards that fall off the stage because the stand was set near the edge, mics that fall and hit the keyboard, hotspots that sratch the surface, keyboards accidently dropped, ships that take a too sharp turn in port, sea air, drunk college guys spraying beer, etc etc.. I've been thankful and amazed to buy some replacement and back up gear in the last year (and new stuff) off EBay that's in great shape, even though it's the same age as my 12 year old gear I'm duplicating with it. I'm trying to be more careful I've noticed if I'm tired that's when stuff gets damaged. I repair immediately or have repaired any type of knob or slider that breaks or keys, etc.
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Beer is made of lots of water. Spilling beer on your keyboard has got to be pretty near the top of the list.

 

 

Well, here is my opportunity to plug Peavy. Back in college I had a Peavy head (a 600 or something)...you know the standard one that everyone had. Anyway, there were two 16 oz beers in plastic cups perched on it, right on top of the vent (you should always have a back up beer in case: (1) you drink one more quickly than expected; or (2) the other one somehow disappears). Of course, some idiot knock into my system and both beers go right down the vent straight into the electronics. That thing never flinched and still works to this day (granted it has been relegated to non-gigging status in our practice studio), but we still use it for practices! :thu:

 

So, I'm thinking that beer is actually GOOD for your electronics. Hey, it's good for me and we humans are made up of lots of electrical impulses (some of us more impulse than electrical) ;)

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My first keyboard was a Juno 106 and I messed that one up by not having a case for it, and I was very young and stupid and started using it on gigs, that's when it got damaged moving it in the car without a case. The sliders are all ripped off it and two keys are broken but it still worked. I havent plugged it in in over ten years, because I bought newer gear that replaced it. I deeply regret that it's in the condition it is in, as my first keyboard it has a lot of sentimental value and I think about it all the time and it saddens me to think of it being in the condition it is in. I'm sure I can't even get those parts now either. This is depressing. Maybe I can disassemble it and mount it on the wall as an art piece, and then go on EBay and buy one that's in brand new condition from being in a home studio. Hey there's a plan!

 

John

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JohnH, the Juno 106 forgives you for the transgression. It understands you were young at the time of your union and didn't fully understand life.

 

It has accepted the mistresses and bastards you have brought home over the years. It is okay. The 106 is your bottom chick. ;):cool:

 

 

PD

 

"The greatest thing you'll ever learn, is just to love and be loved in return."--E. Ahbez "Nature Boy"

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