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Crossroads


Hardtail

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I loved that when I saw it at the theaters. Vai sounds huge. Always thought he had the best tone for that style. In my opinion he beat the kid cuz Jack Butler learned alot of that piece from hearing it once. Plus the kid never tried to copy any of his stuff. SO I argue Jack Butler was the winner.. heh

 

I was just listening to Paul Gilbert's new album. He has a cool tone now. Pretty crazy shred on it too.

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No but cool all the same....story i heard was some of the solo

by the karate kid was RC first part but the winning solo was by

Vai himself and not RC...that is all

The story of life is quicker then the blink of an eye, the story of love is hello, goodbye.
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Always thought he had the best tone for that style

 

Yes i thought so too,he's really one of the very few i can get in to when it comes to that style.

The story of life is quicker then the blink of an eye, the story of love is hello, goodbye.
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From a Vai interview I read shortly after the movie, he did the winning solo and offered a transcription (probably on GP). After that, it was heard in every music store around town. LOL!

 

Ry Cooder did all the blues/slide work. In addition, he also coached Ralph Macchio on where to place his hands on the fretboard to make his faking more believable. He did a good job.

 

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Oh yeah I knew Vai played that fast stuff the kid played and all his stuff. I was well aware when RC was playing.

 

I learned that piece Vai wrote when I was 16 right after it came out. Took a while to play on, but of course I don't remember it. I also learned that one off Yngwie Marching out CD. It was kind of similar in some ways. Both very difficult to nail perfect. Some cool patterns in both too.

 

One cool thing about Vai's tone is his lack of distortion. I mean like in Dave Lee Roth he barely used any. Its like the gain is in his hands. Thats the way it should be in my opinion. Not that his tone doesn't sound distorted in this, I just bet he uses less than it sounds like he does.

 

Tons of shredders in the 80's on Shrapnel and other labels used way more gain than Vai. Thats one reason he stuck out. His tone was bigger sounding and you could hear all his pick attacks and left hand percussion cuz his hands are strong. Thats cuz he didn't use as much gain. If he had more gain the less you would hear those subtle things he does tonally.

 

I dunno about now, maybe uses more distortion now. I haven't bought a CD in a while.

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From a Vai interview I read shortly after the movie, he did the winning solo and offered a transcription (probably on GP). After that, it was heard in every music store around town. LOL!

 

Ry Cooder did all the blues/slide work. In addition, he also coached Ralph Macchio on where to place his hands on the fretboard to make his faking more believable. He did a good job.

 

I think it was in Guitar World. I have the issue in a box somewhere, but I'm too lazy tonight to go find it right now.

Turn me over, I'm done on this side...
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Okay, before this topic goes any further, the transcription for the solo was done a few years back in a GP issue as part of a "cutting heads" article. To be fair, however, and to argue that the kid still won, it should be noted that the solo is Paganini's Caprice No. 5, and since Eugene went to school at Julliard, it is very likely he was exposed to the entire piece at some point in his classical guitar training. The piece is considered a classical violin/guitar etude masterpiece and is still common among certain schools of violin teaching.

 

Several versions of the same thing:

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1e9n-vjZGok

 

 

 

Shut up and play.
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To be fair, however, and to argue that the kid still won, it should be noted that the solo is Paganini's Caprice No. 5, and since Eugene went to school at Julliard, it is very likely he was exposed to the entire piece at some point in his classical guitar training.

 

In the movie, towards the beginning, he was actually playing this piece on his classical guitar in his dorm room. Then he put the guitar down and grabbed his beat up acoustic.

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Thanks, Hardtail. I forgot about that. :D

 

It's been a long time since I saw it but I guess I saw it so many times to still be able to pick out little stuff like that.

 

I didn't know it was a Pagannini piece though. I thought it was some classical hybrid tune written by Vai... so.. thanks for the info.

 

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Okay, before this topic goes any further, the transcription for the solo was done a few years back in a GP issue as part of a "cutting heads" article. To be fair, however, and to argue that the kid still won, it should be noted that the solo is Paganini's Caprice No. 5, and since Eugene went to school at Julliard, it is very likely he was exposed to the entire piece at some point in his classical guitar training. The piece is considered a classical violin/guitar etude masterpiece and is still common among certain schools of violin teaching.

 

Several versions of the same thing:

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1e9n-vjZGok

 

 

 

Man, that first guy has monster hands... looks like he'd be fun to hand with, too.

Raise your children and spoil your grandchildren. Spoil your children and raise your grandchildren.
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A friend of mine was very critical of that film once.

 

Why should Paganini's music have trumped poor old Steve Vai anyway? Was it because it's old and European?

 

Why should classical music necessarily be better than rock? And why would the Vai character have been unable to play Paganini anyway? He could play everything else.

 

My friend sees a bit of implicit racism in the way the contest turns out (ie European culture wins out) and some days I'm inclined to agree with her.

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