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What guitar is this?


Hardtail

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Doh! I wish I'd gotten here first! :freak: Nice catch, 'Zan. :thu:

 

I found Johnny A. through one of youse guys and, still amazed I'd never heard of him, then discovered he rated his own Gibson signature model. Not an LP Special with custom color and inlays, but a really interesting semi-hollowbody. But if you know Johnny A.'s playing you know why Gibson was interested in making a signature guitar. He's a wonderfully tasty player across a bunch of styles. :thu:

It's easiest to find me on Facebook. Neil Bergman

 

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fntstcsnd

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Neil , my problem is i hear about them way before i ever actually hear them.

i read my GP's from cover to cover and then reread them multiple times.

i have heard of lots of artists and still don't know what some of them actually sound like.

i definately need to check out Johnny A.

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Originally posted by Guitarzan:

Neil , my problem is i hear about them way before i ever actually hear them.

i read my GP's from cover to cover and then reread them multiple times.

i have heard of lots of artists and still don't know what some of them actually sound like.

i definately need to check out Johnny A.

Funny you should mention that, 'Zan.

 

I had the same experience when I was an avid Guitar Player reader, in the mid 1980's and early 1990's. Especially with regards to the great jazz players writing for the magazine then. Howard Morgen, Howard Roberts and Joe Pass, to name a few.

 

I stepped into the rain after an early evening class at Columbia College in downtown Chicago, in 1990. I walked past the Hilton on S. Michigan Ave. towards my car only to find a clap-board advertising Joe Pass at the Hotel's club. I didn't have much cash, but could almost scrounge the $14 for entrance. The guy at the door took pity on me. It was a rainy Tuesday or Wednesday and I don't think he expected much of a crowd. If so, he was mostly right. I was thrilled! Finally, I would see and hear one of the guitarists touted as a legend, whose work I'd never taken the time to find, in the flesh.

 

It was, for me, a great night! Joe began the performance solo, soaring through chord melody pieces. Later he added an upright bass and drums for a trio I've never heard equaled. And these other musicians were union locals. Joe couldn't afford to travel with his own group. How sad, on the one hand, but how amazing on the other. Amazing because these guys were smokin'! Joe made it a point to mention he'd let them step out and solo quite a bit because prior to that they had shown in their playing how much they listened to what he was doing and supported it. He repaid that professionalism with extended time in the spotlight for them. It was magical.

 

There was a second show but the rain and the night and, frankly, the lack of interest in this jazz giant made for another small crowd. Someone from the club told me I could stay for the second show and I did. Wow!

 

At the end of the night, Joe invited anyone with a $50 to come back to his room for a bit of music education. I'd tapped out just getting in, so it was time to go home.

 

It's really amazing how many players I know by name who I've never taken the time to listen to, or those I've listened to and enjoyed but haven't bought more music. Stanley Jordan is a perfect example. Loved his first album. Never bought another. :freak: (It's kind of embarrassing to admit. :o )

It's easiest to find me on Facebook. Neil Bergman

 

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fntstcsnd

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I stepped into the rain after an early evening class at Columbia College in downtown Chicago, in 1990. I walked past the Hilton on S. Michigan Ave. towards my car only to find a clap-board advertising Joe Pass at the Hotel's club. I didn't have much cash, but could almost scrounge the $14 for entrance. The guy at the door took pity on me. It was a rainy Tuesday or Wednesday and I don't think he expected much of a crowd. If so, he was mostly right. I was thrilled! Finally, I would see and hear one of the guitarists touted as a legend, whose work I'd never taken the time to find, in the flesh.

 

It was, for me, a great night! Joe began the performance solo, soaring through chord melody pieces. Later he added an upright bass and drums for a trio I've never heard equaled. And these other musicians were union locals. Joe couldn't afford to travel with his own group. How sad, on the one hand, but how amazing on the other. Amazing because these guys were smokin'! Joe made it a point to mention he'd let them step out and solo quite a bit because prior to that they had shown in their playing how much they listened to what he was doing and supported it. He repaid that professionalism with extended time in the spotlight for them. It was magical.

 

There was a second show but the rain and the night and, frankly, the lack of interest in this jazz giant made for another small crowd. Someone from the club told me I could stay for the second show and I did. Wow!

 

At the end of the night, Joe invited anyone with a $50 to come back to his room for a bit of music education. I'd tapped out just getting in, so it was time to go home.

That is a great experience! I'm jealous! Wow!

I loved that story!

 

 

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