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im looking for metal head who can PLAY


fatwannabejock

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hey, anyone out there real good at shredding? if so, what styles do you incorporate most (tremolo picking, hammer-pulls, blues scales, modes, whatever). my rythm is the SHIT and my soloing is pretty tight, but only like bluesy soloing. my shredding sounds kinda like...well...it doesnt sound at all. whats the freakin deal? advice?
turn the gain up
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The best shredding is composed of musical passages that would still sound great even at a slower pace. Like with any other style, the more different techniques that are used will make it all the more interesting for added colors to your playing. Try and incorporate as many different techniques and build up your speed from there (as opposed to achieving speed first and trying to add musicality as an afterthought).
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Find a role model player that you admire. Then visualize yourself doing that. Find someone who can lead you on the path to that whether it is a friend who can play, a new teacher, an instruction video..

 

You would be surprised how learning little things can turn into big things cuz everything effects everything else.

 

I remember I went to a friend's guitar lesson with him (circa 1983). His teacher was a total guitar virtuoso. Anyways he showed my friend the Dokken 'Into the fire' solo (I know thats kind of gay but I was like 13)

 

Anyways, that ascending lick really opened up the fret board for me cuz it connects the dots on the fretboard nicely. You can use it anywhere to connect scales. I don't just play fast patterns now, but that was 23 years ago. Now my fast stuff is constantly mixed up to forward a musical idea. But I remember thinking that and a couple Vinnie Moore licks I learned really did wonders for my 'shredding' at the time.

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Rhino is SOOO spot on here. If it doesn't sound good slow, it's not gonna sound good fast. Musicality is absolutely CRUCIAL to good speed licks.

 

I'm too sloppy at high speed to execute that kind of stuff, so I don't play high-speed - I just craft licks that are as musical and as relevant to the music I'm playing them over as they can be.

 

Even if the notes are crystal clear and you're laying out 100 of them per beat, if it doesn't make sense in the passage you're playing them in, you might just as well be jerking the neck off, because there's no difference from a musical perspective.

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Originally posted by Gifthorse:

(I know thats kind of gay but I was like 13)

GRGLle SNardlellellel

 

Sorry. Pet peeve.

"My two Fender Basses, I just call them "Lesbos" because of the time they spend together in the closet."-Durockrolly

 

This has been a Maisie production. (Directed in part by Spiderman)

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Sorry Bass, that wasn't nice of me. I was actually going to repost after I thought about it and say that I was into cool stuff also, but flash was VERY important for me at that age on guitar.

 

You know as you get older some things behind you fall behind. Just a reality of who we are. Kind of a train moving forward.

 

I meant no disrespect, you rock

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To pursue Gifthorse's idea of videos...

 

Watch videos of players you admire and try to imitate the way they play; place your picking arm the way they do, learn where the motion comes from (elbow, wrist, fingers), hold your pick like them; try to study precisely what they do and ask yourself why they do it that way and how you can achieve the most economy of motion (in other words, you want to be as efficient as possible and move the least possible to strike a note and be ready for the next one). Then repeat this with as many different role models as you can and keep the styles that suit you best.

 

Over the years, I've radically changed, slightly modified or fine-tuned my technique many, many times. I've ended with many different ways of playing that are all useful and became my style so to speak. Nothing is set in stone and you can always improve on what you do.

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I learned the "run to the hills" solo a long time ago and we play it live cause the bass player liked the song..

 

I never knew that was shredding but I guess it is :)

 

My advice is learn that solo I think it has about every style of stuff you are talking about in it.

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I run 2 cause they make me :D

 

It was the gay thing, nothing to do with age, actually.

 

Yes, I do rock, though. :D

 

Uh oh, I think fatwannabejock is gonna be mad at us....

"My two Fender Basses, I just call them "Lesbos" because of the time they spend together in the closet."-Durockrolly

 

This has been a Maisie production. (Directed in part by Spiderman)

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Dude, no one here is really much of a shred artist. Not that we all hate that style, but I think most of the regulars are admitted slow-hands.

 

Having said that, we have a few people who might be more knowledgable if you stick around long enough. My best advice is to go get the John Petrucci "Wild Stringdom" book and his "Rock Discipline" video. I've used both, and while I don't really shred, they both improved my playing enoromously.

Shut up and play.
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Dude, no one here is really much of a shred artist. Not that we all hate that style, but I think most of the regulars are admitted slow-hands.
Well, actually there are ALOT of players in the forum that are shredders. I am a shredder. I mean if I choose to be. I can do it well too. Everyone here has had good advice. In the end if you want to shred well you have to log in the practice time. For rock it isn't as hard as you may think. I mean it is usually in 1 tonal center and you can kind of play anything over it.

 

When you get into jazz fusion, country, bluegrass thats when it becomes more cerebral and selective.

 

Alot of shredders practice scale patterns to a metronome until they can play them really fast in time. Then if they know the song is in eminor or aminor it is a no brainer for them. Practice on acoustic if you have one, it will make your hands stronger and articulate your picking technique so you aren't a weakling hiding behind a wall of distortion.

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Shredding as most people think of it, at least I do and most of the guitarists I know, is defined as fast-playing in some sort of heavy metal style with quick legato, tapping, and well-defined picking runs. I would put Malmsteen, Vai, Petrucci (some of his stuff), Kirk Hammett, and many others in that category.

 

If you're talking about fast playing being a style, that's fine. Then you could put people like McLaughlin and DiMeola.

 

Of course, it doesn't mean my definition is right. It just means that's what I was talking about when I said we don't have a lot of shredders on this forum. I suppose slang definitions are one of those locality and culture things that differ across America.

Shut up and play.
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John Coltrane the ultimate shredder? Well, you could think of him that way, I guess.. surely the man had fine technique, although he wasn't the only sax player who could play fast, let alone the only MUSICIAN!

 

Trane was beautiful in part because he put just as much heart into his slow playing as into the fast stuff... wasn't afraid of beautiful melody, wasn't afraid to play the blues....

 

Most of the musicians I admire, some of whom are virtuosos, have the same attitude. I don't consider a musician great if he can't play simple things well... IMHO, but I think it makes sense!

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I was just trying to push the envelope in terms of the definition. I think that there is a place in playing fast, intense exciting music for effect. Of John was about more than just that. I suppose it terms of pure speed, it would have to be a piano player.

Sometimes, what we call shredding is something only loosely musical that has more in common with athletics to paraphrase Jeremy from the bass forum.

Sometimes, the truly difficult thing is to play slowly well.

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