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Speeeeed


GoodMorningLiberty

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Speed is a pretty broad term. I mean I think you mean "how do I play fast licks that are cool without sounding like a hack?"

 

Practice is really the only way. It is the same as working out. Find a player you admire and listen to them tons. Try an nail down exactly what you like about thier style. Then learn what they are doing and practice the tools that will get you there. The more you learn and can play the faster you will grow. Just like a seedling becoming a tree. The more foilage and root system it has, the faster and more efficiently it grows.

 

Remember it is attainable to anyone. It isn't as magical as you think. You can do it.

 

Just like working out, over time you see results.

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Here's a link:

 

http://www.tomhess.net/articles.php?article=34

 

The best thing I can tell you is it takes patience and time. There's no sense in speeding up right away if you sound like shit. Play it slow.. get it down.

 

There's no quick solution here. Some people can attain it faster (no pun intended) than others but basically, everyone has to do the work.

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Play cool, and make it sound soulful. Copy your guitar heros, but don't worry about how fast your fingers can go. Make sure they go to the right places, and make the cool sounds you want......

 

Speed Kills!! :thu:

Don

 

"There once was a note, Pure and Easy. Playing so free, like a breath rippling by."

 

 

http://www.soundclick.com/bands/pagemusic.cfm?bandID=574296

 

http://www.myspace.com/imdrs

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I agree with mdrs. Speed is cool for alot of styles, but making it soulful is much more important if you trying to make good music. David Gilmore is a prime example. Not very fast like Van Halen or Satriani but look at any ranking of the greatest lead solos and Gilmore is ALWAYS at or near the top. Clapton is another good example. Use fast riffs sparingly and at the right places but keep it soulful. :cool:

SEHpicker

SEHpicker

 

The further a society drifts from truth the more it will hate those who speak it." George Orwell

 

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And then there is the fact that people who REALLY have great technique often make difficult things sound easy, so you're only aware of the music itself. In order to do so, they have to learn to play it well at a slow(er) tempo first.

 

BTW, I saw a thing on the Allan Holdsworth site where this guy actually did a "notes per second" analysis of a number of well-known players.

 

I do work with a metronome, but when listening to music, I don't get out the metronome and count NPS in order to decide if the music interests or moves me! How about you guys??

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Metronome!!

 

It's a great benchmark for where you ability is vs where it needs to be too! Start slow and up the tempo as your hands learn where they are going, and when.

What a horrible night to have a curse.
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Metronome is great for practicing anything, but it is also helpful in conjunction to practicing to metronome, to play along with CD's or with other musicians.

 

That way you can practice some of the scales chords with a musical backdrop and learn how to apply them using your ear. Ear training is as important as any of it. Actually it is the most important if you ask me. You can learn a ton of stuff, but if you don't have a good ear it doesn't mean shit.

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