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Presskit Bio... How do you do 'em?


Griffinator

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Bios aren't too hard. Talk about your experience and any career highlights. Stuff like,

 

"Scott has been playing guitar for over 10 years and specializes in metal, classical and blues styles. After doing a stint as the second guitarist in The Eric Clapton Blues Band, he moved on to create his own group.

 

Some of Scott's highlights include, playing at Woodstock and backing up Jimi hendrix.

 

Scott also plays the bass, the saxophone and the triangle."

 

Keep it short and too the point. Remember that a press kit is like your bands resume. You want to sell yourself, not tell your life's story.

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Kit:

 

Cover - The cover of your press kit should introduce your band and tell the venue or booking agent what type of music you play. It should display your Local Band Logo in and Eye Catching and To the Point manner. Always add your contact information whenever possible. Include your Name, Band Name, Phone number, Address, E-mail address, Website URL, and any other contact info necessary.

 

Artist Bio Page or Intro Page - Introduce your band , tell your genre of music, names of the members, specific info about your band or style of music, how many people in the act, name some quality clubs that you have played, and what areas or cities do you perform. Does your act have a sound guy for live performances or will the venue need to provide one? Does your band have lights or a light show? Highlight this information and any key characteristics about your act. Include your Fan Base, (Do you have one?). Are you a Tribute band, Original band, Acoustic act? Remember in most cases for your band to make money or get another gig at a club, you must bring in people to see the show. So if you don't have a fan base, Reflect upon how you will promote the show on your website, or send flyers to the venue. If you just want to get your bands foot in the door, the best bet is to try open mic nights, and leave your press kit for the owner for possible future gigs.

 

Band Pictures - You'll want to get some Professional 8x10's taken of your act. The better the Picture quality, the more seriously someone important may look into your press kit. If you can not afford professional taken pictures, blow up some of your best band pics to 8x10. Smaller individual shots of band members could be displayed, with a description of the picture. Use your imagination. You may even want to include your best picture on your cover.

 

Equipment Page - If you did not cover equipment in your Artist Bio above, this is the place to do it. List the types of equipment your band will bring to the venue. Include Brand names, wattage of amps, whether you have a PA system, Mics, etc. If you don't own a PA, target clubs that have there own PA. But, be aware that you need someone to run the PA, so find out what they charge for their sound guy, and whether you can bring your own. Does your band have lights and someone to run them too? All this info should be included in your equipment page of your press kit.

 

Booking Information - Have a page with contact Names, Phone, Web address, Fax, and E-mail address so the venue can find the info quickly. It's best to have Booking Info all through your press package. Also, include booking info on your bands demo CD's or Tapes that you send with your kit.

 

Demo CD / Tape - A venue or club will want to hear what they are paying for. Create a demo CD or tape with usually no more than 3 Songs. Place a label on your CD with your song titles, and all your booking information. In case the Club owner etc. would lose your press kit and only had your CD, he would still be able to contact you. Make your CD/Tape look and sound as professional as possible. This will get the venue's attention, and make them listen to your material and possibly book your act.

 

Song List - Place a list of some of the material your band performs in your press kit. Include a list of your best Cover Songs, Original Music, and any other material you may want to add.

Gig Sheet - Include a gig sheet of where you have played or where your band will be gigging in the future.

 

Newspaper Clippings / Reviews - Obviously if your local band or act is just starting out you will not have clippings just yet. But, why not contact your local municipal paper, college paper, city paper, etc, and see if they would cover one of your shows. You would be surprised at the response you can get, especially from local municipal or school newspapers. Include any copies of Newspaper Clippings in your press kit. This shows credibility and that your an established act.

 

Business Cards - Include your acts business card in your press kit. never know what person in the crowd may have significant contacts. Include Band Name, Contact Name, Phone, Website URL, E-mail address

 

Envelope - Even your Envelope including your Press Kit should catch the club owner or bookers eye. Use a loud color, or place stickers on your envelope that may catch a venue owners eye. Your act may want to be more conservative w/ submissions to record companies, but be inventive and get them to open your press kit and listen to your demos.

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Originally posted by A String:

Great stuff Lee! :thu:

Yeah...I would expect Lee to have that nailed better than most! :)

 

We used promo-kits back in my band days...

The 8x10 B&W glossy photos.

A short overview of the band.

Places gigged.

And of course, a cassette demo tape.

(YES...I said cassette tape. :D I'm talkin' 'bout the late '70s-early '80s baby!)

 

I still have some of those 8x10 glossies...what a gas to look at them now...25-30 years later! :)

miroslav - miroslavmusic.com

 

"Just because it happened to you, it doesn't mean it's important."

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LOL!

 

Thanks Lee. I'm writing up my personal bio for the band page. That, plus everyone else's, plus the really great photos we got from a local guy with a 16 megapixel pro digital SLR-type camera (free! :thu: ) plus the three songs we've got done right now (back into the studio tomorrow) should make a pretty nifty presskit.

 

I'll have to bug Rob (singer) about putting contact info on the disc artwork.

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As a journalist who used to deal with political press kits of all things, there are several most important considerations. Regardless of whether you are selling yourself to a record company or a magazine or whatever, keep these in mind.

 

1. Don't put in anything that wouldn't amuse you. Journalists and producers are swamped for time. Don't put in a bunch of stuff nobody cares about.

 

2. Make it flashy and stand out. What are you going to pick up: a cool CD-case multimedia press kit or just some sheets of paper? Just don't overdo the flair.

 

3. Stick to your main message. If you expect people to listen to your songs or call you back, it helps to pick songs and whatever that best represents you and your tone. Don't fill the kit with obscure songs that have little impact on the rest of your playing or your style. In other words, if your speciality is heavy metal, don't include that one slow song where the drummer was on vacation and you guys wrote it on a piano at 4:00 a.m.

 

4. Never forget contact information. If you expect to be called back, make your contact information easy to find, preferably at the top of the kit.

 

Anyway, one of my specialties as a political and mass communications major is selling ideas. If you need more help, PM me. I'll try to dig up some more stuff.

Shut up and play.
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Originally posted by revolead:

In other words, if your speciality is heavy metal, don't include that one slow song where the drummer was on vacation and you guys wrote it on a piano at 4:00 a.m.

No worries there. Despite my singer's pleading to the contrary, we have yet to write one! :D
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Originally posted by revolead:

1. Don't put in anything that wouldn't amuse you. Journalists and producers are swamped for time. Don't put in a bunch of stuff nobody cares about.

Exactly.

 

You have to look at it from the receivers perspective.

If your band is looking for bar gigs...then think about what a typical bar owner would want to take the time to read, look at and listen to that would land you the gig!

 

Giving your entire music/playing history may be good if you are writing your memoirs...

but it's probably way more info than is needed for basic press kit.

 

Once you become famous...then by all means...write those memoirs! :D

miroslav - miroslavmusic.com

 

"Just because it happened to you, it doesn't mean it's important."

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