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Anyone own a vintage instrument?


Fender Bender_dup1

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If 'vintage' means more than 25 years old (which it usually does) then I have an Ibanez Studio ST-105 made in 1979.

 

I also have an almost-vintage Aria TA-40 and Fender Studio 85 amp.

 

 

McG.

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I have played one or two that made me understand what the whole "vintage" thing is about. Oddly enough one was a '62 Strat. When they are good, they are really good. Unfortunately, they made more "ho-hum" and "aw, crud" axes back in the day than they did really great instruments.

The prices are way beyond $2K for an original '62. Even the refins are going for more, I think.

Always remember that you are unique. Just like everyone else.

 

 

 

 

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Vintage LPs, Teles and Strats from the 50s and 60s are certainly NOT worth the $20-100K (that's right) that they are being sold for nowadays.

 

Original Esquires from that era are fetching upwards of $50k. I'm sorry but no guitar is worth that much.

 

Prices have skyrocketed in the last 5 years as ageing yuppie speculators have bought into the vintage market.

 

I own a few vintage guitars but they are either not in "collectable" condition or are not highly sought after.

"You never can vouch for your own consciousness." - Norman Mailer
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I have a Gibson L6-S I bought new back in 72. I've seen em for sale on E-Bay for $1000.... I don't know why I never got rid of it but it still sits here played maybe once a month just to say it got played...

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I think this is a two part question.

 

1. Are vintage guitars worth the money?

To each their own. Anything is worth exactly what someone is willing to pay. Vintage guitars are worth a lot to some, nothing to others.

 

2. Is the quality of vintage guitars worth the money.

My personal feelings are absolutely not. We all know that there are some good quality guitars being made in some very low price ranges now days, but if you are willing to spend $2k-$5k you can have an absolute top quality guitar made for you. Things that match or blow away anything vintage.

 

That being said, if you have the money, would it feel good to own an original 1959 Les Paul?

 

Probably.

 

There's a built in "value meter" in all of us when it comes to old stuff. Vintage cars, vintage guitars, antiques of every kind and shape.

There's something to be said for owning something of quality built long ago and made famous by time and use.

bbach

 

Beauty is in the eye of the beer holder.

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Originally posted by Rampdog:

I have a Gibson L6-S I bought new back in 72.

Rampy, did you evr have trouble with that L6S? Carlos Santana said his were like General Motors cars, always breaking down and having to be fixed.

Always remember that you are unique. Just like everyone else.

 

 

 

 

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I have a Hagstrom Swede that's more than 30 years old...great guitar, then and now.

But I would not spend a few $$$k on something... JUST because it was made 30 years ago.

 

In most cases...about 60% of any of those infalted prices goes towards paying for hype and nothing more...

 

I can get great tone out many $200 guitars...and a $200 amp/speaker.

miroslav - miroslavmusic.com

 

"Just because it happened to you, it doesn't mean it's important."

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Originally posted by miroslav:

In most cases...about 60% of any of those infalted prices goes towards paying for hype and nothing more...

 

I can get great tone out many $200 guitars...and a $200 amp/speaker.

I agree, miro, a lot of the vintage hype IS hype. They made grody guitars back then too, more of them than now, actually, because manufacturing hardware & methods have gotten better. You can get a lot more guitar for $200 than you could just a few years ago.

Always remember that you are unique. Just like everyone else.

 

 

 

 

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I have an early 1965 Gibson 335 ... very little wear, all original, stoptail, nickle parts, wide neck. You know, the 'Crossroads' version like the 1964 ES-335 that Eric Clapton auctioned for $847,500. :eek: It plays and sounds great for sure ... and I 'saved' over $840K! :P
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I have a '56 Guild Starfire. It's not stock (new tuners, and I'm pretty sure the pickup isn't stock) and it's seen it's share of real world use & abuse. Does it play wonderfully? Yes, perhaps better than I do! Would I have paid a grand or three for it? No. (a steal at $300.00 back in '93) Will I get a couple grand if I sell it? Probably not. So is it worth it for me to sell it? Nope. Not unless someone offers me a huge sum of money; then I'd think twice, but probably not sell. So from an opportunity cost standpoint, it might be "worth" a lot.

 

Though I wouldn't mind selling the "original case" to some vintage-minded person for a ridiculous amount of money. It's a chipboard case that looks & smells 50 years old! Can I e-bay it for $500?

 

My Gibson ES 335- I've never dated it, but from what I know, I think it's a '74. Another sweet axe, not stock (SD pickups, stopbar inplace of original trapeze-small repair on the binding where that was). Could I sell it for a fair amount of money? Probably. Will I? Try prying it from my cold dead fingers. Did I pay a lot for it? Nope- $500.00 in '86.

 

Two great investments in my talents; not in futures speculation.

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Is anyone going to argue with Billy F Gibbons that his stock 59 Pearly Gates LP is not the best guitar on the planet by the distance of three football pitches? I'd suspect that guitar's value to be in the million$. Gary Moore sold his Greeny 59 LP to a collector for $1.8m. Serious serious money.
Give me a break!
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I own a bunch of worthless (ok, near worthless ;) ) vintage equipment.

 

First up is the Peavey T-60 guitar & Peavey Pacer amp my parents bought for my brother in 1978. :D The guitar is in need of rewiring and re-fret and the amp is all but dead and not worth fixing except as a DIY project. ;)

 

Second is the vintage banjolin that has graced this forum. Gruhn Guitars' best guess is it is circa 1920's, but there is no information on the make and it is barely playable, as mandolin/banjolins go. I bought it for $125 from Gruhn 10 years ago and that's probably about all it's worth now.

 

Third up is the flamenco classical I inherited from my mom. It's a Granados, which I've neither seen nor heard of anywhere else. Nice rosewood guitar, but it needs new tuners. I have no idea what the market values it at.

 

Fourth is my Kramer Voyager, Custom Limited Edition Signature Model (Signed the neck at the block myself! :D ), a Voyager body I bought for $26 after Kramer went under. It was wired with three p'ups, switches, pots and output leads but no jack. The pups had mounting rings but weren't screwed to the body. It was routed for a Floyd but I was sure a Kahler would be better, so I had Flynn Guitars in Evanston, IL assemble it with a Chandler Industries neck, Schaller tuners and the Kahler. The stock bridge p'up, which I loved, had a short in it, so I bought a cheap Jackson replacement. Worst investment I've ever made. That p'up sounds like ass and always has. But who knew with as much gain as we were running back in 1989? :freak::o

 

Finally, I own quite a bit of vintage electronic gear, some of which is useful, none of which is worth much. Late 1970's MXR Distortion+, Boss analog delay, Ibanez phaser, a mid to late 1980's Ibanez HD1500 harmonizer/delay, a Korg DDD-5 drum machine and several "vintage" cables. :D

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Originally posted by Fender Bender:

Is anyone going to argue with Billy F Gibbons that his stock 59 Pearly Gates LP is not the best guitar on the planet by the distance of three football pitches? I'd suspect that guitar's value to be in the million$. Gary Moore sold his Greeny 59 LP to a collector for $1.8m. Serious serious money.

I guess it would be difficult to argue with him if the topic was reduced to "him" and "his opinion". Outside of that... he's no intellectual giant by any stretch! Just plays a style of guitar rather fluently.... and one that I enjoyed (before they went video)

You pay That kind of money ($10~6) because of who owned it not what it is. If Billy F. Gibbons can't impress me you or anyone else with a 2006 stock '59 Reissue in his hands... well he aint much good then is he.

 

Voodoo.

I still think guitars are like shoes, but louder.

 

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My 1987 Yamaha BB300 bass is close to vintage. (The 25-year-old definition, anyway.)

 

I'd also consider my 1990 Ibanez RG560 vintage, as it's not in production anymore. It has the 2 single coils, and bridge humbucker. Ibanez no longer features this configuration in any of their current RG's. RG560's as old as mine (or older) are highly prized in the collectors market, esp. because they were made in Japan. EDIT: A lot of the similar guitars in its price range today are now made in Korea. (The RG560 cost me about $500 back in 1992.)

 

I've got a keeper, yes sir. :thu:

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I own a '65 Gibson ES330 that I paid $300 for back in the early '80s. It doesn't have nearly the value of a 335 or Les Paul but it has certainly appreciated. I think they go for around $2K to $3K now. I absolutely love this guitar and would never part with it. It has a unique woody yet growly tone that I've never heard from another guitar. I would say that this guitar is well worth the current going prices. It is unique, very well built and plays like soft butter.

 

I also have a '63 Gretsch Corvette that looks just like this one. It was a cheap guitar when it was new and it's a cheap guitar now. I got it for free back in the late '70s and apparently they're going for about $300 - $500 now. That's a fair price IMHO. The one really cool thing about this guitar though is the tone. It is all Gretsch.

 

Also; while not considered vintage, my '89 PRS has appreciated a lot. I paid $750 for it slightly used in '91 and they're commanding close to $3K now.

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My 1976 Ibanez Destroyer (lawsuit Explorer) plays as good or better than any Gibson Explorer that I have ever played. I saw one recently that was a little bit nicer than mine go on ebay for $950. Mine gets played very, very little, so I'm going to sell it sometime in the next couple months. It is going to help finance Les Paul ownership.

Avoid playing the amplifier at a volume setting high enough to produce a distorted sound through the speaker-Fender Guitar Course-1966

 

 

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I have an old, pretty beat up no-name parlor guitar (slender body, classical style headstock but standard bridge pins, short scale). The bridge has ornate acorn decorations carved on either side. My parents got it for me when I started playing guitar from my guitar teacher...I have a feeling they got it cheap becuase he expected we'd sell it back when I grew out of it (that was the commom practice)? My mom always said it looked vintage and kept it... I took it to a guitar store to see if it was worth fixing up...they estimated it to be pre-ww2 (40's).

How much would such an intrument be worth, consiering it has no-name, no serial number, nothing (tuning machines seem to have been replaced)??

 

 

Other than that, I have a british made (the more sought-after brown tolex version, i believe that puts it around the early 90's) Gibson GA-30 which people tell me should appreciate in value very soon and rapidly. I'm not sure what year my Schecter CSH-1 is (I got it used)...it's not vintage by any means, but that finish has been discontinued for a while.

I also have a rondo sx p90 strat copy, that type was just recently discontinued by them. Although it's not a brand name, would such an instrument appreciate value at all, given that it's pretty unique?

 

I have my highest hope for an about 10-year old Hanika 50MF Classical. It's their entry-level guitar, but it's a renowned classical guitar builder. This is the one I can see (and already feel) getting better and better with age.

 

So, what about instruments coming out today...will they some day be vintage to the same esteem as the old tele's and strats? I mean, back in that day almost everything was in some way new and inovative...these days it's more of a sum of parts, many of which are just improvements of the vintage stuff. Does that mean that the "vintage" hype no longer applies to anything produced recently?

-Andy

 

 

"I know we all can't stay here forever so I want to write my words on the face of today...and they'll paint it"

 

-Shannon Hoon (Blind Melon)

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I own a 1967 Gretsch Tennessean. It would sell for around $3,000.00 these days. A current Gretsch reissue of the same guitar sells for signifcantly less and is probably of higher quality construction. Gretsch was notorious for being hit or miss in quality from the early sixties through the early eightiess, especially after the Baldwin buy-out in 1967. They are much more consistent these days, even if they are manufactured in East Asia.

 

So to answer your question, no, I don't think vintage instruments are usually worth their significantly higher purchase price. I believe it is a whole lot easier to get a higher quality new instrument at a lower price than it would would cost to get a similar quality vintage one. My 2 cents...

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Ok - here's my "vintage" list:

 

-1943 Epiphone Olympic. Sounds awesome. If it was an Emperor it would be worth big bucks. But it's not.

 

-1958 Fender Duo-Sonic. Been refinished and has a big hole under the pickguard where someone routed for a humbucker. If it was stock, it might be worth some $$. But it's not.

 

-195?/196? Airline archtop made by Kay. Worthless.

 

-1971 Fender Telecaster. Hot rodded to the hilt and sounds like god. But. . . it's been hot rodded to the hilt. Maybe worth around $2K because stock, beat up CBS Teles from the early 70s are selling for upwards of $5-8K (!!!!!!!!).

 

-1990 PRS Custom. Collectable - as is any PRS bult at the original factory. Not that they're any better than the later ones but they were built in a different building so now they cost more.

 

-1992 Ibanez 540S-7. Rare seven string Saber. Not worth a lot but worth more than it originally cost new.

 

I have a lot of great guitars. If I had a 1950s/60s Strat, Les Paul, etc. I'd sell it in a heartbeat and buy a house.

"You never can vouch for your own consciousness." - Norman Mailer
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I think the major value of vintage guitars (and I have had several) is for what I think of as a "soul prosthetic." Basically, like most boomers, I have no soul when it comes to guitar playing (though I can bend notes and look pained as well as the next guy). Having a vintage guitar automatically adds soul to your playing, at a rate of about one "soul quantum" per decade. So, when I play "hesitation blues" on my 1956 Gibson L-50 archtop, I have about 5 extra soul quanta, plus a bonus because it was made in the same year I was born and I paid less than a grand for it.

 

Similarly, when I play a screaming box blues lead on my 1974 L6S, it is funkier by about 3 quanta beyond if I play it on my other guitars.

 

On the other hand, no matter how old a martin you might have you get no bonus soul points.

 

Hope this helps.

 

Eric

 

PS, I am looking to sell my L6S, anyone innerested, let me know.

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