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ear plugs


hoddie

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Originally posted by guitarzan:

i have an endless supply of ear plugs.

we have pretty well a wide selection at work.

Hey 'zan, you might want to try a pair of musician's earplugs one of these days. While work-type plugs will definitely protect your hearing, they also more than likely muffle the sound in a very un-musical way; you might be surprised at the difference :idea: .
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Originally posted by Rhino Madness:

Originally posted by guitarzan:

i have an endless supply of ear plugs.

we have pretty well a wide selection at work.

Hey 'zan, you might want to try a pair of musician's earplugs one of these days. While work-type plugs will definitely protect your hearing, they also more than likely muffle the sound in a very un-musical way; you might be surprised at the difference :idea: .
Yep a huge difference too +1 :thu:
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Every two years I get a new pair. You can get a local audiologist to cast your ears, I get mine done at the trade shows. The advantage is that the cast plugs put no pressure on your ears, (foam is always trying to return to its original shape, making them quite uncomfortable for many people, including me) and the business part of the casting... a little 'can', is replaceable and comes in various amounts of attenuation. I use -25dB cans in all of my plugs. The down-side is that these are expensive... about $100 a pair... but many HMOs or other health programs will cover the cost.

 

Bill

"I believe that entertainment can aspire to be art, and can become art, but if you set out to make art you're an idiot."

 

Steve Martin

 

Show business: we're all here because we're not all there.

 

 

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Bill is absolutely correct. Go to an audiologist. They will give you the option of filters that reduce the sound by 25db, 20db or 15db. I have the 20db, but I think it is too much. I hear everything clearly, all the BOOM is gone, but the volume is very low so that your own voice inside your head is very loud. This could be a problem or an advantage for singers (I don't sing). I may switch out the filters for the 15db model.
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Originally posted by Rhino Madness:

Originally posted by guitarzan:

i have an endless supply of ear plugs.

we have pretty well a wide selection at work.

Hey 'zan, you might want to try a pair of musician's earplugs one of these days. While work-type plugs will definitely protect your hearing, they also more than likely muffle the sound in a very un-musical way; you might be surprised at the difference :idea: .
i understand your point exactly.

i have the option to do just that. my last hearing test at work ended in a discussion on the that type.

i can get reimbursed for my pair when i get them.

i only pointed out that i had a wide variety to choose from and they do give you the lowdown on what frequencies are affected. some have a fairly flat response.

i have seen ear plugs in music stores that were no different than what we have at work but way more costly.

i am sceptical about those, probably the only difference is the package and marketing.

 

i suggest to anyone to use hearing protection when around any loud noise like mowing, rifles and such, you will find you will lower the volume on the TV, car radio etc later.

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Hey!:I have posted about eardrum damages...it seems all you care for, I like so much to read it but really I wanted to explain that is worst to be idiot in rehearsing. In a stage you should give all your best! so I never used protection plugs,not gig often, If you do PERFECT!!!
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I've tried all of the professional/audiologist custom made plugs.....I have those ones that are molded to your ear canal and have the switchable inserts.

 

I also had a larger rubbery custom pair made, that is molded to your ear canal AND your external ear, so it fills up most of your external ear. These fit in really nicely.

 

However, I still prefer the Hearos that Rhino mentioned above;

 

http://www.musiciansfriend.com/product/Hearos-High-Fidelity-Ear-Filters?sku=421214

 

I like the way those hearos fit. You can slide them in snugger, and they cut down more on the sound. I use these when I play loud, and when I go to any live shows.

 

The custom ones always seem to loosen up when I move my jaws, and let too much sound in.

 

When I shoot my guns, either at the range or while hunting, I use the foam inserts (which have maximal protection) http://www.musiciansfriend.com/product/Hearos-Extreme-Ear-Filters-7-Pair?sku=421222

 

I then put a standard "ear muffs" over the top. So, I'm "double" protecting my ears.

 

I'm 50, and have had a slight hiss in my hearing for about two years. I wish I'd been stricter at using Hearos years ago.

 

Once you lose your hearing, it will not come back!! Prevention is the way to go!

Don

 

"There once was a note, Pure and Easy. Playing so free, like a breath rippling by."

 

 

http://www.soundclick.com/bands/pagemusic.cfm?bandID=574296

 

http://www.myspace.com/imdrs

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yes MDRS said "Once you lose your hearing, it will not come back!! Prevention is the way to go!" that´s the key!!!. Auditive nerve cells never regenerate lost frequences or tant per cent hearing are lost forever...
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I'm glad I began using the ear plugs in my teens. Even then, I'd heard of a few cases of some friends that had severely damaged their hearing. It's never too early to start protecting your ears.

 

I generally use the blue Hearos swimming ear plugs. They have about 25db of protection in them. I don't sing much at all, so it's not a problem for me.

 

Don't forget, your portable players and other listening habits (including noisy nightclubs) can also be part of the problem. So, if you're the type that frequently listens to your audio material (mp3's, CD's, vinyl, whatever) LOUD, then you might have some hearing problems. You'll know if you keep saying "What?" to ask someone to repeat stuff back to you.

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Originally posted by Dr. Taz:

(...) then you might have some hearing problems. You'll know if you keep saying "What?" to ask someone to repeat stuff back to you.

Funny story: a few years ago I took a hearing test partly to settle an argument with my naturally-soft-spoken significant other. I claimed I couldn't hear her properly because she was not speaking loud enough and she claimed my music made me deaf.

 

The test showed my hearing was still above average at all frequencies. I came back home triumphantly telling her I was right; but no, she had to turn it around and "prove" instead that I was just not paying enough attention to her when she talks :rolleyes: . There is just no winning :D .

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Another story here (still kind of on-topic)...

 

A club-going non-musician friend was telling me how he liked listening to the sound of silence when coming back home after a night out. After discussing what he meant, it turned out he was listening to his tinnitus and thought that was the normal sound of silence :eek: !

 

That's the only time I've ever heard of someone appreciating his tinnitus :D .

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guitars...I know that that sounds better, and is "cool", but you will most definately pay a price eventually for "letting your ears bleed".

 

Loud sound literally damages the hair cells in your inner ear which send the message of hearing to your brain. Once damaged the hair cells can not repair themselves. Once they are damaged, the damage is permanent. It CAN NOT BE FIXED. You are born with one set of hair cells in each inner ear. They can not reproduce more of them selves. So, what happens is that you damage and destroy these cells, but don't hear any difference in your hearing for many years. When you lose the critical number of these hair cells in the inner ear that it finally affects your hearing, THE HEARING LOSS AND TINITIS IS PERMANENT. And remember that these hair cells die off from normal age as well. So, naturally you will lose these cells, and eventually hearing from age alone.

 

So, the only way to keep hearing well is to PREVENT THE DEATH OF AS MANY INNER EAR HAIR CELLS AS POSSIBLE.

 

It may seem cool to "let your ears bleed". But, unfortunately, the reality is that all you are doing is providing momentary gratification, but long term DEAFNESS.

 

I'm not picking on you. I just think it's important that people understand this.

 

If I was Gibson, or Fender, or Paul Reed Smith, I'd give a free pair of Hearos with each guitar they sell. The music industry should do a much much better job of educating us about hearing loss.

Don

 

"There once was a note, Pure and Easy. Playing so free, like a breath rippling by."

 

 

http://www.soundclick.com/bands/pagemusic.cfm?bandID=574296

 

http://www.myspace.com/imdrs

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