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New guitar AMP Suggestion


Mr_Newbie_LP

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Anybody know anything about guitar amps?

 

Looking for a guitar amp for practice, rehersal AND small gigs. Needs to be loud enough to get over a drummer. Preferably 1x12" combo, 30-40 watt all tube OR 50-60 watt solid state. For good blues, classic rock and hard rock sounds. No need for super high gain distortion.

 

Budget is really going to keep it less than US$550

 

What do you think is my best option working within those constraints?

Mr_Newbie_LP
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Originally posted by miroslav:

Do you Traynor amps down there?

 

The YCV40 is a 40W, 112 combo that is good for blues/rock....and it is priced in your range.

The good news: They do. I see that Turramurra sells them.

The bad news: For $1,295 Australian dollars, (i.e. more than $950 US or $1,050 Canadian) :eek: . That's a hell of a marjup from their price over here, and a bit out of his range.

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I took Myles advice and road tested a Line 6. I've never liked solid state amps, but this one works good for me. My old tube amp needs work so I bought it and brought it home. After playing around with all the knobs for about a week, I can get some decent tone out of it.

 

http://www.guitaramplifierblueprinting.com/line6.html

Life is two periods of play interupted by 40 years of work.
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here i go again... try to score an older (no longer made) Yamaha DG80 or DG100.

one of the few digital modelers that get great clean and just breaking up OD tones. it can do paint peeling gain as well but most modelers can do that, it is the clean and OD where they suffer.

XLR out with speaker sim and midi capable.

the DG80 has one celestion and an extension speaker jack. whereas the DG100 has dual Celestion Vintage 30's.

here is the downside..

the DG100 weighs 73 lbs.

bonus features include tremelo, chorus and tape echo.

and KNOBS!!! they point to the actual settings.

no twidling to "capture" the setting before adjusting.

the pots are motorized and turn when you change patches.

i am quite happy with mine.

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Personally, I'd rather have a used (of course, depending on the condition/treatment of it) Peavey Classic 30 (first choice) or Hot Rod Deluxe (second)..than many of the other amps new.

Used CAN be a plus...if it was treated well it is "worked in".

 

I actually have a Classic 30, and a HR DeVille..so I don't have to choose.

 

Another great altenative is one of the Carvins (they can be great) like Nomad. The OD channel has it's own EQ...but it needs it, unless you want to mod (guy named Hasserl has some popular mods to it).

 

If it doesn't have to be tube, the Roland Cube 60 is a great little amp (I use it for backup, but still way more prefer tube amps).

====================================================

Check out my original music at

http://www.soundclick.com/bands/jacker

 

"In theory there is no difference between theory and practice,

but not in practice."

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so lets say i got a classic 30 used for a good price

 

could i use it for bedroom practice or would it sound like crap at those low volumes?

 

does it come with a headphone jack for silent practice?

 

i was thinking of using an OD/distortion pedal with it as well, to get more versatility so im gald to read it takes pedals well

 

also, if you buy a tube amp and never crank it enough to overdrive the power tubes, is it worth having? what i mean is, are the dynamics of tube amplification worth having if you dont plan to overdrive the power stage?

 

coz some people reckon that tubes just sound better than solid state almost all the time, regardless of what level you run them at

 

for my uses (and budget), would i be better off with a hybrid amp with lots of headroom, and just rely on the tube in the preamp stage for distortion? or as an alternative, a good powerful solid state amp with a great overdrive/distortion pedal (possible bootique pedal with tubes)?

 

there are so many options for sound out there that its just too hard to narrow my decision

Mr_Newbie_LP
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If you're not ruling out Solid State, try one of the models in Tech 21's "Trademark" line. I got their Trademark 10 practice amp, and I have to sya it's awesome. Except it's not that easy tomake it sound clean.

 

The Yamaha DG80's are apparently awesome.

"Without music, life would be a mistake."

--from 'Beyond Good and Evil', by Friedrich Nietzsche

 

My MySpace Space

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thanks, no im not ruling out solid state

 

i AM ruling out DIGITAL modelling amps though

 

so no trademark 60s or yamaha DGS, or for that matter line 60s, i want a simple setup, no changing the sound of the amp coming out of my amp, to confusing, and most of the modelling ive heard sounds crud anyway

Mr_Newbie_LP
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Originally posted by Mr_Newbie_LP:

...i AM ruling out DIGITAL modelling amps though

 

so no trademark 60s...

Trademark 60s are all analog. No digital modelling. Their circuit is solid-state "tube emulation."

 

This is totally different than digital modelling. No micro-processors or DA conversion involved. You turn a knob and change the amp's circuit, thereby changing the sound of the amp.

 

These things are rock-solid reliable and sound great.

Mudcat's music on Soundclick

 

"Work hard. Rock hard. Eat hard. Sleep hard. Grow big. Wear glasses if you need 'em."-The Webb Wilder Credo-

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the website audio samples sound pretty good

 

the trademark-60 price range here in australia is AU$1300-$1500

 

a classic 30 can be had for about AU$1000

 

a HRD can be had for about AU$1300

 

does any of this help me make a decision, not really

 

geez...what to do

Mr_Newbie_LP
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DG series amps are very much like a normal amp. there are no menus or multi effect crap.

a simple setup with 8 basic starting points for sculpting tone.

just knobs.

all the preamp settings are variations on itself.

clean

crunch

drive

and lead

basically it sounds like itself.

there is no voodoo or dogdoo.

if you do see one , try it you will be suprised.

there is no button you press to sound like Hendrix or EVH.

it is an amp. that just happens to have a digital preamp and space to store 128 different tones.

Yamaha DG series have a power amp section that is not anemic like some modelers.

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Originally posted by Mr_Newbie_LP:

...i have no idea where to find a DG series amp..its like they are discontinued...

I believe this is the case, though I'm not 100% certain. Quite a shame as they are excellent amps.

Mudcat's music on Soundclick

 

"Work hard. Rock hard. Eat hard. Sleep hard. Grow big. Wear glasses if you need 'em."-The Webb Wilder Credo-

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hey, so i like the idea of the classic 30

 

if i got a classic 30, what pedals would u suggest i get to compliment it, in terms of boosts/overdrives/distortions/fuzzes etc, what sort of sounds would it give me, and what would be the benefit of running those pedals into the 30

 

also, another factor i have to consider, can u use the 30 as a 'silent practice' amp, like does it have a headphone jack? im guessing not, but can u dial it down low enough to practice in your room without offending people in the next room, or is that out of the question?

Mr_Newbie_LP
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Consider getting a used Classic 30 or HRD. Not only does that knock a chunk off the price tag, but if you decide to replace it and have taken care of it, you can sell it for nearly what you paid.

 

I had an HRD which was stolen (broke the glass in my minivan). I replaced it with a used Blues Deluxe in mint condition (I know the owner so I know where it's been, too). I still kinda miss the HRD, though I'm starting to get used to the BD. HRD is more versatile; the BD seems louder and definitely has more headroom & less compression -- I have to play better to make it work. If I keep missing the HRD, I can probably find a used one and make the exchange for less than $100.

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Speaking of Peavey Classic 30, does this sound like a good deal, okay deal or no deal at all?

black finish. in great shape. have added new jj power tubes, tube guard, and tube tamer to keep the tubes from rattling. a great blues/american rock amp. comes with upgraded footswitch and brown amp cover. 300 firm.

Raise your children and spoil your grandchildren. Spoil your children and raise your grandchildren.
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Originally posted by Mr_Newbie_LP:

well that depends, are you selling or buying, what currency is the 300 in, and are you nearby to me, so you can sell me it :D

Could I back you up a second here?

 

What I'm wondering is, though you've described what you want pretty well (inexpensive, sounds good, practice amp...seems you need it also to be able to play silent into headphones, not a modeller).

 

But first. What are you REALLY going to use this for? I mean, is it for practice, and MAYBE playing once a great while with others, or is it for practice, practice also late at night, not wanting to disturb the neighbors, wife, etc. but also DEFINITELY going to be playing with others?

 

If with others, in a band situation with a drummer and all?

 

Mainly, I don't know of any tube amps that have headphone out jacks. There may be some, but it would require a good deal of extra circuitry, which I am positive if it even existed would then be out of the price range you want. Reason being, a tube amp can not be disconnected from it's speakers without either damaging the amp (output transformer at the very least) OR it has to have some impedance circuitry, like a "hotplate" built in...which is going to cost more. And I don't know of any that have that.

So that pretty much limits you to solid state.

 

Also, WHY not a modeller?

 

To be honest...IF you are mainly for sure going to use it for practice but hope later on to hook up with a band, the best solution is get a little practice amp, save up and also later on get a Classic 30.

 

That's one scenario, and if that really was a solution for you...I would one step further and advise you to get a Tascam GT-2 Guitar "trainer"...which is the best at home practice device you will ever see. CD player with possibility to slow down keeping pitch (to learn those hard parts) or change pitch (to play SRV and Jimi without having to tune down) which also has a guitar input, (you can use stomp boxes on input and/or) with some not-so-great built in effects. The thing can run into headphones (most used) for silent practice, OR has outs you can run into a stereo, etc.

 

That is one of THE most effective practice "rigs" I know of.

 

Then you'd eventually save up for like a Classic 30, and for daytime, or whatever you got that and it would great in a band.

 

Another alternative, again with Classic 30 or equivalent as a goal for using to play out with, you can buy a cheap little Cate GX-15r and honest to god...that thing sounds reat. I have even plugged a 2 x 12" cab onto it, and it amazingly sounds full and pretty big! It's cheap, and it really does sound great, except the reverb. Then you buy the Classic 30 for playing in the band.

 

 

The last alternative I know for sure would work, get a Cube 60 (or maybe even a 30). It IS a modeller, but not like a Line6 or anything. They are inexpensive, sound damned good, and you can always add an external cabinet with 2 x 12"s or 4 x 12"s and it WILL sound big. It isn't the same (to me) as a tube amp...

 

But if money is tight, remember too, tube amps need more maintenance. Replacing tubes, if you play out you ought to have a backup amp anyway as tube amps can go out on you...so we're back to the Cube60.

 

Personally I have a number of tube amps, I bought the Cube 60 for it's flexibility, and as a backup amp (because it is relatively small and light, and sounds great. I would have no sorrow if I HAD to use it because my main amp went bad one night. I could still play and like what I heard).

 

Those are really the options as I see them. Main point here, if you want "silent playing" you will either have to go solid state or that Tascam (which is the best guitar practice I have ever played through. Had mine now for about 5 years I think). Since you are going SS for the headphone, you can either go CHEAP, and also save up for a tube "playing out" amp....which is what I'd do, OR you can can get somethign like the Cube60 which can do it all.

====================================================

Check out my original music at

http://www.soundclick.com/bands/jacker

 

"In theory there is no difference between theory and practice,

but not in practice."

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thanks, that was an awesome post, and pretty much confirmed what i was starting to think anyway, orignally i though i could save some dough by getting a band amp and using it for quiet practice as well, instead of having two amps, but after a fair bit of research i realise no tube amp powerful enough for band practice and gigs is going to dial down enough for quiet home practice as well, and any choice of ss amp for playing out is probably going to be a compromise in tone, so im really gonna need two amps, a 30-50 watt tube amp for playing out and a small ss practice amp or equivalent for quiet/silent practice

 

ill check out those tascams, and if not, ill look into some small 10 and 15 watt ss practice amps, then for playing out ill consider the classic 30 or fender HRD

 

cheers guys, if anyone has anything else to add, please do, can use all the advice i can get

Mr_Newbie_LP
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