Jump to content
Please note: You can easily log in to MPN using your Facebook account!

More Bliss or Blister-less--Update


Pappy P

Recommended Posts

This has never happened before, or atleast I can't remember that far back.

 

I practice bass for two hours each day on Sunday and Monday.

 

Now I have a painful blister on my ring finger (tip). And I have one starting on my index finger also.

 

Should I pierce and drain, or let it heal on it's own.

 

I intend to practice again tonight, so I'm not favoring piercing the blister.

 

What would you guys do?

 

Do any of you recommend flat wounds over round wounds?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Replies 18
  • Created
  • Last Reply
I've yet to obtain blisters upon my fingers, for I've only callouses at the current moment, which I am led to believe comes ever natural. But yeah, let them proceed with whatever they plan to do, it does hurt less if you do not apply force.
"The best political weapon is the weapon of terror. Cruelty commands respect. Men may hate us, but we don't ask for their love; only for their fear." -Heinrich Himmler
Link to comment
Share on other sites

If you let them alone for a couple days (read: don't play) they will drain internally and stiffen up. Once they've stiffened, you'll have a better chance of building callous material in that spot the next time you play.

 

Bass is a bitch like that - unless you play with super-light strings, using fingertips is almost impossible, and the other parts of your fingers blister first, before they callous.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Dont be such a drama queen Papster! :D As far as im aware, the most damage you can cause the tips of your fingers is loss of sensation!

 

They'll sort themselves out mate, are you attacking the strings harder than you normally would? I do this when im a bit uptight.

 

Relax buddy, its gonna be fine. :D

 

Your wife will be complaining about the callouses on your fingers in no time. hehehe

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yeah, it takes a while. Most likely the flesh is slightly bruised under the skin, too.

 

Around the end of the spring/beginningof the summer I spent about 5 weeks playing bass for this band w/ some friends, just covering for a while. It was the first time in my whole life I had spent more than 10 minutes playing bass in one sitting. I had to practice a lot, b/c also I had to sight-read bass clef (F-clef) and the rhythms were highly syncopated--it was in a salsa/Afro-Caribbean band. It was this stupidly crappy, bad-sounding and uncomfortable bass (another friend's who deosn't even play bass). I bruised my fingers a couple days a time and then it'd hurt even when showing simple stuff to my students on the guitar. Towards the end, things were going back to normal.

 

It'll take a while but you'll get used to it. Just try to stop playing for a few days. You can use that time to practice on right-hand technique, practicing rhythm-reading, or learning new concepts in music theory.

"Without music, life would be a mistake."

--from 'Beyond Good and Evil', by Friedrich Nietzsche

 

My MySpace Space

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Stop playing and give your fingers a week to heal. Then start playing again slowly. Also, consider changing your playing style (at least, for the time being): set your bass up with nice low action, and PLAY LIGHTLY. I find that a lot of really excellent players do this; it leaves lots of headroom when needed. And the tone is better!

 

After playing a while you'll develop callouses and you can then play harder, if your style requires it. But there are even really hot thumb & snap players who use a light touch.

 

Being a keyboard player first, acoustic guitar player second, electric guitar player third, and bass player only when there isn't a real bass player, I tend to thump that baby too hard, and whenever I manage to back off and use control, the results are a LOT better, not only for my fingers but for the sound of the instrument as well.

 

Playing classical guitar is good cross-training for bass, BTW. Except for the thumb & snap, of course.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I heard a story from John Entwhistle regarding his unorthodox (at the time) technique of playing w/ his two fingers.

 

He said he had always seen bass players use their thumb in downward motion, until he saw a guy playing in a pub using his pointer finger to play. He became intrigued, and started thinking of the possibilities of playing w/ his pointer, middle, and maybe the ring finger. When the band broke, he approached the guy and said:

 

"That's amazing! How did you ever think to play the instrument that way???"

 

The guy replied: "Well, I normally play like this (with the thumb), but I've got a blister tonight."

Cass Anawaty, Chief Engineer

Sunbreak Music, LLC

High Resolution Stereo and Surround Mastering

www.sunbreakmusic.com

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Be sure to let 'em really heal or you'll be back to square 1 (or really square 0 or -1: it'll be worse than before). If you have to play meanwhile, you can try taping them, just don't expect good tone. (Adhesive tape.)

 

Great story about Entwistle, never heard that. :)

 

Do many bass players use their thumbs these days? (Ignoring thumb & snap, of course.) My thumb always sits on the pickup or thumbrest, and I use my fingers in classical style free stroke or rest stroke, depending on the situation (usually rest stroke). I use up to three fingers -- like classical guitar, the pinky generally isn't used.

 

I suspect the reason lots of folks played with thumb is that Leo Fender did, and the early P-bass had the rest below the strings. Or so I heard -- is that just a legend?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

This has never happened before, or atleast I can't remember that far back.

 

I practice bass for two hours each day on Sunday and Monday.

 

Now I have a painful blister on my ring finger (tip). And I have one starting on my index finger also.

 

Should I pierce and drain, or let it heal on it's own.

 

I intend to practice again tonight, so I'm not favoring piercing the blister.

 

What would you guys do?

 

Do any of you recommend flat wounds over round wounds?

I always use roundwounds, including fretless. During camp, I didn't have good calluses (and again now...damn middle school) so I got some blisters. I just kept playing. I didn't do a thing. They became calluses.

 

If you let them alone for a couple days (read: don't play) they will drain internally and stiffen up. Once they've stiffened, you'll have a better chance of building callous material in that spot the next time you play.

 

Bass is a bitch like that - unless you play with super-light strings, using fingertips is almost impossible, and the other parts of your fingers blister first, before they callous.

It's not almost impossible! If I can do it, you can. I started at age 9 and I couldn't even hold the strings down or reach the first fret. Just keep playing and ignore the blisters. Concentrate on the groove. The blisters will go away.

"My two Fender Basses, I just call them "Lesbos" because of the time they spend together in the closet."-Durockrolly

 

This has been a Maisie production. (Directed in part by Spiderman)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...