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Is music hardwired in our brains?


popcritic

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Definitely hard-wired. I see it as a component of language. We talk to babies in sing-song voices unconsiously and they respond to the changes in pitch more than if we spoke to them in a montone voice. It seems to me to be an essential part of language learning. Coupled with the repetetive patterns inherent in music it plays a huge role in learning period.

 

Attempting to make order out of chaos is a uniquely human attribute. We try to do it with everything. Music is another aspect of that.

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Originally posted by Big Red 67:

The whole of excistance is music.

In a sence...

It's actually rythem or rythems of nature and sympathec responces we key into to satisfy our soul.

We crave the grain of life and the lift it gives to our journey. Being able to sync in to those beats seems to capture more of our senses for a simultanious ride than most any other endeavour we entertain.

 

God we're pathetic creatures aren't we :D

I still think guitars are like shoes, but louder.

 

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The first thinker to try to find a place for music in the Darwinian order was Charles Darwin. In his 1871 book ``The Descent of Man," he argued, ``musical notes and rhythm were first acquired by the male or female progenitors of mankind for the sake of charming the opposite sex." Darwin's model was bird song. In many bird species, males sing to impress females. Depending on the species, females will tend toward the males with the broadest repertoire or the most complex or unique songs.

 

ok, in the animal kingdom the chicks go for the shredder dudes.

:D

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Originally posted by Guitars are like shoes. But louder.:

Originally posted by Big Red 67:

The whole of excistance is music.

In a sence...

It's actually rythem or rythems of nature and sympathec responces we key into to satisfy our soul.

We crave the grain of life and the lift it gives to our journey. Being able to sync in to those beats seems to capture more of our senses for a simultanious ride than most any other endeavour we entertain.

 

God we're pathetic creatures aren't we :D

Ha! The mirror mirrors the mirror.
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I have mentioned it before. The area in the brain that children use to learn language is the same area they learn music. The younger a child is subjected to music, the more likely he / she may be drawn toward music. It is also affected by genetic predisposition.

 

The sad part about this is as we age, we no longer access this part of the brain and anyone who tries to learn a new language as an adult will know, it is tough. We learn it by rote, unlike children who learn it in a natural process. Do you know any bi or multilingual families? If more than once language is spoke in the household, the children pick it up with no effort at all.

 

There have been countless University studies backing this up. So as CSN&Y sing, Teach Your Children Well.

 

Peace.

 

(I knew all that college would be useful one day. ;-) )

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Based on personal experience, music is controlled by a different part of our brain than speech. In January last year I suffered had a head injury that caused some loss of memory and speech. For example I'd know what a thing like a mango was, I just couldn't remember the word to describe it. (much improved now). One night lying in my hospital bed, I wondered if I'd also forgotten how to play music so I tested myself out. I was relieved when I discovered that my mind could still visualise whole slabs of classical music.

I'm still amazed that I can remember how to play a piece of music that I learnt by rote 20 years ago, but still have to practice endlessly to remember a new piece of music.

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Speech is learned in a different area of he brain than it is stored. When you have to relearn it, it is much harder because the mechanics of learning to talk is controlled in the area it has been moved to and where an adult has to learn it.

 

You are also talking about short term and long term memory that are stored and controlled in different parts of the brain.

 

Head injuries also complicate things as they some times damage the pathways the synapses have to travel for speech.

 

Ask your neurosurgeon, or doc about it. It is quite complicated and an injury complicates it even more.

 

Peace

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Many thanks Zuben, and to your wife just for being a doctor - after what happened they're definately my favourite people! It's been a year and a half now and life is getting back to something like normal. They told me it take about 2 years to fully recover.

 

Sometimes a randomly heard piece of music affects me in ways that it's hard to explain - tears and goosebumps and extreme elation, all that stuff. Most recent time was last week while I was in a newsagent with an old Fleetwood Mac song playing on the radio.

(I should mention this sorrt of thing has happened long before my injury, don't want to give the impression I was turned into some kind of music-savant)

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I'm glad you're getting better Philidor. Losing your memory must be a terrible thing (and what's with the name change anyway?).

 

And yes, I think music is pretty much hardwired into us. I've never heard of any culture, regardless of how remote and primitive it is that doesn't have some sort of music.

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I think the music you listen always remain in some place of your brain like a software that help us composing or improvising. In both cases I try to organize the main idea and turn notes into something consistent. You just have to play and the resources will start to flow from some place of your "hardware brain" I believe

"Play something unpredictable!"

"I've been trying to do that my whole life"

(Hedges' 1993 concert)

www.myspace.com/facundoesquelles

 

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Originally posted by Kramer Ferrington III.:

I'm glad you're getting better Philidor. Losing your memory must be a terrible thing (and what's with the name change anyway?).

 

And yes, I think music is pretty much hardwired into us. I've never heard of any culture, regardless of how remote and primitive it is that doesn't have some sort of music.

It has it's moments, like any illness. But I think we all can find inner reserves that get us through these things. And being in a haze,not being quite in touch with reality sort of helps, you don't dwell on the awfulness quite so much. I had a few other injuries as well. But it's in the past and life goes on. I'll PM you if you want an update on the other matters connected with all this that I mentioned to you a while back.

As we're all aware by now there are places in the world where music is banned, poor buggers. I saw a great program on TV about a guy who is like a Pakistani Santana - he is a really good player too this guy. Anyway he went to an area where music is banned (not just western rock music- all music) and confronted the mullahs! Great program, I really admired his courage and tenacity.

as far as the name change goes, I play a lot of chess on the internet and kept seeing the words Philidor's Defense. He was a grandmaster and also a muso. So Phil le mec is no more.

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