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Changing Chords


Big Malky

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Anyone got tips for learning to change chords quickly? I can play all the open chords with no problems but can't string any together. I'm not looking for miracles, just a simple way to pick things up.

 

Cheers all,

 

Big Malky

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Yeah, I&I is correct. There are no shortcuts.

 

Head out to the music store and find a tablature book for your favourite band. As you learn the songs, you will be sub-consciously practising the chord changes. By the time you have learnt the songs, you'll find you can change the chords a lot better then you could before. Plus, you get the added benefit of having a bunch of new chords and songs under your belt.

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I got a tab book today A String, got lots of the simple (I say simple lol) Metallica, Pantera and Iron Maiden stuff in there. I've only had the guitar a day so far but 3 hours practise a night should get me there eventually.

 

I learned my first lesson today in the life of a guitarist... cut your fret hand nails lol

 

Thanks for the input to A and Big Red.

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Originally posted by Big Malky:

Anyone got tips for learning to change chords quickly? I can play all the open chords with no problems but can't string any together. I'm not looking for miracles, just a simple way to pick things up.

 

Cheers all,

 

Big Malky

Get a metronome, set it at "nearly dead" speed and work your way up.
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Originally posted by Big Malky:

Anyone got tips for learning to change chords quickly? I can play all the open chords with no problems but can't string any together. I'm not looking for miracles, just a simple way to pick things up.

 

Cheers all,

 

Big Malky

Start with Em

 

Practice moving your middle and ring fingers back and forth from the A and D strings (Em) to the D and G strings, while adding your index to the B first fret (Am)

 

Make this change repeatedly.

 

Now, from an Am, move your ring finger from the G string 2nd fret to the A string 3rd fret © Make this change repeatedly.

 

Now, from a C, practice moving your middle and ring fingers from the D and A strings to the G and D strings while adding a barre over the high E with your index. (F). Practice it 'til you're sick of it.

 

From an F, move your ring finger from the D string 3rd fret to the high E 2nd fret (D7)

 

Make this change repeatedly.

 

From a D7...slowly, very slowly, slide the whole chord UP one fret (to the third fret). While doing so..move your index and middle finger from the B and G strings ALL THE WAY over to the A string and low E strings. If you do this right, you should end up at a G chord. Go back and forth repeatedly. This is the most difficult change for beginners to make.

 

Now, when you've got all that down, practice going from Em, Am, C, F, D7, G and back down.

 

Now, change from the G to an Em. Do this over and over and over again 'til you get it.

 

Now, go from G, to Em. Change THROUGH the Am (not actually playing it) to a C. Change THROUGH the F chord to a D7.

 

G-Em-C-D7

 

I-vi-IV-V (7)...you've got a doo-wop progression. Do it over and over again til it's natural.

"Cisco Kid, was a friend of mine"
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When you are reading along with the song books, and changing chords, go SLOW, and try to place all three or four of your fingertips onto their proper string/fret positions ALL AT ONCE. This will be difficult at first, (like you're spastic or something) but pays off later. If you do like a lot of people, and place your fingers one at a time, you'll have a harder time making fast changes later.
"I've been imitated so well I've heard people copy my mistakes." - Jimi Hendrix
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One thing I find, of course start slow, but don't keep at it till frustration sets in. I let my fingers work their way slowly into the changes, as slow as required to get it perfect, no buzzing frets...try strumming each note to make sure you have the chord clean, then I put that song aside and do something else. Next day I'll come back to it and find a noticeable improvement. Work it some more then move on, but I don't push too hard on the speed, let it come naturally. At some point, I kick on the drum machine and work the changes at a tempo, then start bringing it up. I find it much easier to let these tricky changes grow over days as opposed to expecting too much from one sitting.
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There are shortcuts, It's time to get your hopes up, folks. I've been instructing full time since 1998 by God's Grace alone and I have seen ways to get results at faster rates rather than "by rote" or through "Trial and error". You can doubt me all you want, but the doubters may have to consider that haven't been teaching for almost 10 years full time

 

First, no picking hand - Only fretting hand

Example:Four Chords called "A" "B" "C" "D"

 

switch between A & B back and forth non-stop

 

Say they both require the index, middle, ring finger

 

look where the index for chord A goes to where the index is required for chord B

 

now just practice moving the index only from A to B w/o the rest of the fingers

 

now do it w/just the middle for both

 

Now do it with both the I & M

 

ring fing only

 

now all three

 

Do the same with chord B now

 

Now switch back and forth between A & B again

 

Now repeat the same rigorous steps w/chord C

 

Now ABC

 

Remember NO PICKING HAND

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Playing "Hey Joe" is good practice for a beginner. I use it to warm up just about every time I play.

C G D A Em

 

Get a metronome and start at a pace that allows you to play the progression comfortably.

 

Fret the G chord with your pinky on the first string. Ring finger on the 6th string and bird finger on the 5th string. Might feel a bit awkward at first but doing it this way will enable you to switch back and forth between C and G quickly.

quote:Originally posted by mdrs:

 

It's pure B.S., and obvioulsy inaccurate. I suspect it is posted for effect, not for accuracy.

 

John Petrucci > Johnny Winter

The Edge > Ted Nugent

Guitar One Mag > Guitarplayer

Slash > Carlton

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Great tips all. I'll practice with my son's keyboard in place of a metronome though (tight Scot here lol), just as good. I'll be trying all the ways to see which I find easier.

 

Got the Am to Em down so far Tedster :)

 

Again, thanks all. This is the friendliest and handiest forum I've been on so far.

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Originally posted by yZeCounsel:

There are shortcuts, It's time to get your hopes up, folks. I've been instructing full time since 1998 by God's Grace alone and I have seen ways to get results at faster rates rather than "by rote" or through "Trial and error". You can doubt me all you want, but the doubters may have to consider that haven't been teaching for almost 10 years full time

I think that is a bad statement. I started teaching, full time back in 95'. I'm not teaching anymore, but I certainly have gone through my fair share of students as well.

 

There are many ways to teach chord changes, but in my experience, nothing beats the way I mentioned in my post. It keeps it fun and because they are so exited to learn the new song, they practise more.

 

I'm not saying my way is easiest or better then your way, but certainly it is a silly statement to say that you have some magical shortcut that is better then any other method.

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Originally posted by A String:

Originally posted by yZeCounsel:

There are shortcuts, It's time to get your hopes up, folks. I've been instructing full time since 1998 by God's Grace alone and I have seen ways to get results at faster rates rather than "by rote" or through "Trial and error". You can doubt me all you want, but the doubters may have to consider that haven't been teaching for almost 10 years full time

I think that is a bad statement. I started teaching, full time back in 95'. I'm not teaching anymore, but I certainly have gone through my fair share of students as well.

 

There are many ways to teach chord changes, but in my experience, nothing beats the way I mentioned in my post. It keeps it fun and because they are so exited to learn the new song, they practise more.

 

I'm not saying my way is easiest or better then your way, but certainly it is a silly statement to say that you have some magical shortcut that is better then any other method.

No majic, just a way to get 'er done alot quicker. I have personal knowledge that it works. You can do this with any chord progression that you find to be "fun" as you put it.

Nice use of the adjective "silly" and the hyperbolic device to allege that I was claiming that it was majic, when I wasn't.

You're really making a big deal of this aren't you?

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Originally posted by yZeCounsel:

Originally posted by A String:

Originally posted by yZeCounsel:

There are shortcuts, It's time to get your hopes up, folks. I've been instructing full time since 1998 by God's Grace alone and I have seen ways to get results at faster rates rather than "by rote" or through "Trial and error". You can doubt me all you want, but the doubters may have to consider that haven't been teaching for almost 10 years full time

I think that is a bad statement. I started teaching, full time back in 95'. I'm not teaching anymore, but I certainly have gone through my fair share of students as well.

 

There are many ways to teach chord changes, but in my experience, nothing beats the way I mentioned in my post. It keeps it fun and because they are so exited to learn the new song, they practise more.

 

I'm not saying my way is easiest or better then your way, but certainly it is a silly statement to say that you have some magical shortcut that is better then any other method.

No majic, just a way to get 'er done alot quicker. I have personal knowledge that it works. You can do this with any chord progression that you find to be "fun" as you put it.

Nice use of the adjective "silly" and the hyperbolic device to allege that I was claiming that it was majic, when I wasn't.

You're really making a big deal of this aren't you?

Whoa there. There was no offence meant. I have as much experience with teaching as you do and I find that my method works well. I'm sure yours works well too. But telling a new student that you have some technique that is better then mine, Tedster's, WornNeck, Hfx_Buzz or any one else who has a technique to share is just egotistical.

 

The truth is, there are no shortcuts. Practise is practise regardless of which practise technique you choose.

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Different people have different ways of learning and different learning curves. A method that works for Joe just might not be the right one for Bob. The teachers job is to find how to best direct the students learning process.

 

There are no shortcuts, there are different methods of teaching the fingers to move the way you want them to.

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Originally posted by Justus A. Picker:

Different people have different ways of learning and different learning curves. A method that works for Joe just might not be the right one for Bob. The teachers job is to find how to best direct the students learning process.

 

There are no shortcuts, there are different methods of teaching the fingers to move the way you want them to.

I agree 100%
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Originally posted by A String:

telling a new student that you have some technique that is better then mine, Tedster's, WornNeck, Hfx_Buzz or any one else who has a technique to share is just egotistical.

 

The truth is, there are no shortcuts. Practise is practise regardless of which practise technique you choose.

In regards to the last sentence you posted, Depends if you'd rather take a moped or a motorcycle.

All i did was claim that there is an alternative to the "trial and error" and "rote". I didn't infer that I had a better method, just a quicker way than most approaches. Show me in the original post where i discredited anybody whom you mentioned

 

I just believe that there is an enslavement mentality which emanates from the public School system which trickles down into other forms of education which basically promotes rote/trial and error learning and is devoid of any logical step by step systematic premise. I see, on a day by day basis; that the method I have been using cut to the chase and get folks switching even complicated jazz progressions effortlessly.

 

I have taken advanced statistics classes, and you can get a good idea that something works for the whole when you get a sample size of 30. Well the sample size I have been using exceeds 30 and involves male, female, pre teen, teen, young adult, middle age, and older alike. So I can conclude beyond any reasonable doubt that this approach challenges and can defeat the "no two snowflakes are alike- works for you/not for me" cliche.

 

I have tried the "by rote" and "trial and error" approach and it takes alot longer. If they don't practice, they won't get it - that simple.

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Originally posted by yZeCounsel:

Originally posted by A String:

telling a new student that you have some technique that is better then mine, Tedster's, WornNeck, Hfx_Buzz or any one else who has a technique to share is just egotistical.

 

The truth is, there are no shortcuts. Practise is practise regardless of which practise technique you choose.

In regards to the last sentence you posted, Depends if you'd rather take a moped or a motorcycle.

All i did was claim that there is an alternative to the "trial and error" and "rote". I didn't infer that I had a better method, just a quicker way than most approaches. Show me in the original post where i discredited anybody whom you mentioned

 

I just believe that there is an enslavement mentality which emanates from the public School system which trickles down into other forms of education which basically promotes rote/trial and error learning and is devoid of any logical step by step systematic premise. I see, on a day by day basis; that the method I have been using cut to the chase and get folks switching even complicated jazz progressions effortlessly.

 

I have taken advanced statistics classes, and you can get a good idea that something works for the whole when you get a sample size of 30. Well the sample size I have been using exceeds 30 and involves male, female, pre teen, teen, young adult, middle age, and older alike. So I can conclude beyond any reasonable doubt that this approach challenges and can defeat the "no two snowflakes are alike- works for you/not for me" cliche.

 

I have tried the "by rote" and "trial and error" approach and it takes alot longer. If they don't practice, they won't get it - that simple.

I agree that ANY technique is better then trial and error. But when I suggested that there were no short cuts and you had to practise a technique, you said "There is a short cut".

 

I'm not disputing your technique, only your claims that it's a shortcut.

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Originally posted by yZeCounsel:

Originally posted by Justus A. Picker:

If they don't practice, they won't get it - that simple.
And that is the bottom line, no matter what method is used!
Would you rather take the pinto or the mustang to get there?
That depends on which one has the fuller gas tank! ;)

 

There's nothing wrong with focusing on the left hand alone,it's a commonly used teaching method, but it is still doing it by "rote", repeating the movement until it becomes second nature. Similarly, focusing on the right hand alone is a common method for teaching right hand finger independence in the CG world. Seperating the tasks allows the mind to focus on one task rather than coordinating the two. It still requires repetition. It still requires practice.

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Originally posted by Justus A. Picker:

First you learn to change them slowly, very slowly, and practice the changes over and over and over again. Then you speed it up a little. Lather, rinse, repeat.

+1

 

I call this the Tai-Chi method. That's how I teach chords to my students SINCE THE VERY BEGINNING.

 

Shortcuts? There ARE shortcuts. It was posted by Justus, expanded here...

 

Is there a finger in chord "x" that's on the same string as the next chord "y"? Then slide that finger when go back and forth between "x" and "y"! D

 

Don't lift your fingers too far off the fretboard when switching--find always the shortest distance between one onte and the other.

 

Prepare fingers, in other words, mimic the shape of the next chord as move towards it.

 

Are you arpeggiating instead of strumming? Put the notes kind of in the order they need to be played.

 

Leave common note/fingers put ahiwl shifting the others smoothly. For example: when going from a common open B7 to a common open E major, leave that secong finger on the 5th string, 2nd fret, don't move it. Just take off the 4th finger and smoothly have fingers 1 & 3 exchange strings.

 

First super slowly, no beat. Then practice changes to a slow steady tempo, giving a few beats to each chord, but strumming each only once.

 

If you practice like this you'll get it down SOONER than you would if you didn't practice like this. You can see it as a shortcut in this context. However, it requires more discipline and concentration. Which is good, because you'll learn how to tell your fingers when and how to move all the time.

"Without music, life would be a mistake."

--from 'Beyond Good and Evil', by Friedrich Nietzsche

 

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Originally posted by yZeCounsel:

First, no picking hand - Only fretting hand

Example:Four Chords called "A" "B" "C" "D"

 

switch between A & B back and forth non-stop

 

Say they both require the index, middle, ring finger

 

look where the index for chord A goes to where the index is required for chord B

 

now just practice moving the index only from A to B w/o the rest of the fingers

 

now do it w/just the middle for both

 

Now do it with both the I & M

 

ring fing only

 

now all three

 

Do the same with chord B now

 

Now switch back and forth between A & B again

 

Now repeat the same rigorous steps w/chord C

 

Now ABC

 

Remember NO PICKING HAND

This is another good way.

"Without music, life would be a mistake."

--from 'Beyond Good and Evil', by Friedrich Nietzsche

 

My MySpace Space

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