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Al DiMeola


Tone Taster

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Great Clip.....Elegant Gypsy way back in the day was a kick ass album.

 

Too bad they use the quick edit crap that is so popular today. This wasn't as bad as some, but, how many times do we need to see the drummers hands, or the backside of Al while he is playing?

Once I thought I saw you, in a crowded, hazy, bar........

 

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This bores me. Believe me, I've tried to enjoy Al, but 95% of what I've heard has been utterly meaningless to me.

 

My favorite Al DiMeola tune was a short practice piece from a Guitar Player soundpage in the late 1980's. It was an eclectic little piece. Interesting. Slow. Plenty of style, which to me, is sorely lacking from the electric fusion stuff in the video.

 

But that's my opinion.

It's easiest to find me on Facebook. Neil Bergman

 

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fntstcsnd

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Pretty fast licks on that Cap. Di Meola is great at throwing in a fast lick on the fly. He really influenced alot of shredders from the 80's, and this video has that total 88' feel to it. Personally I like probably 3 songs that I have heard by him, but I haven't heard much. Medditeranean Sundance, and then another one with Paco De Lucia and John Mcan'tspellit. They are both awesome to listen too. There is another one but I can't remember the name.

 

The shit where he just masterbates playing a bunch of patterns fast bores me, so does John's. I like it when they play some rythmns or something on guitar and not just play a bunch of fast staggered single note passages. The mahivishnu orchestra made me want to put a hole in my head when I listened to the videos that are accesable on youtube. But I realize these guys are innovators and both brilliant players no doubt. There are some things I like by them, but I like listenability more than just displays of speed.

 

Paco De Lucia is a badass, I love his style.

 

So is Mchaglihgn (haha, cant spell it)

 

Vinnie Moore was an early shred influence of mine. He really copied alot of Dimeola's style but added the sweeping arpeggio thing. I loved his first 2 albums. I haven't heard them in 18 years. I remember the chord changes being fun and easy to shred over.

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Originally posted by flagshipmile:

Pretty fast licks on that Cap. Di Meola is great at throwing in a fast lick on the fly. He really influenced alot of shredders from the 80's, and this video has that total 88' feel to it. Personally I like probably 3 songs that I have heard by him, but I haven't heard much. Medditeranean Sundance, and then another one with Paco De Lucia and John Mcan'tspellit. They are both awesome to listen too. There is another one but I can't remember the name.

 

The shit where he just masterbates playing a bunch of patterns fast bores me, so does John's. I like it when they play some rythmns or something on guitar and not just play a bunch of fast staggered single note passages. The mahivishnu orchestra made me want to put a hole in my head when I listened to the videos that are accesable on youtube. But I realize these guys are innovators and both brilliant players no doubt. There are some things I like by them, but I like listenability more than just displays of speed.

 

Paco De Lucia is a badass, I love his style.

 

So is Mchaglihgn (haha, cant spell it)

 

Vinnie Moore was an early shred influence of mine. He really copied alot of Dimeola's style but added the sweeping arpeggio thing. I loved his first 2 albums. I haven't heard them in 18 years. I remember the chord changes being fun and easy to shred over.

i really dug Vinnie as well and had a chance to see him in a clinic a few years back. very impressive. a nice guy too. humble and very melodic.
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Originally posted by Guitarzan:

Originally posted by flagshipmile:

...Vinnie Moore was an early shred influence of mine. He really copied alot of Dimeola's style but added the sweeping arpeggio thing. I loved his first 2 albums. I haven't heard them in 18 years. I remember the chord changes being fun and easy to shred over.

i really dug Vinnie as well and had a chance to see him in a clinic a few years back. very impressive. a nice guy too. humble and very melodic.
For a short time I was into Vinnie Moore. I could never approach that kind of speed, though.

 

He did a clinic in 1986, IIRC, in which he played a few arpeggios at slow, medium and fast speeds. I clearly remember the collective sighs of disbelief as he deftly played each at high speed. :D I just couldn't listen to his music for very long, though. A few years later he lent a song to a compilation CD put together as Guitar For The Practicing Musician's Practicing Musicians. It was the least shred thing I ever heard from him, and it was by far the most interesting to listen to more than once. ;)

It's easiest to find me on Facebook. Neil Bergman

 

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I saw Al D from the front row at Convocation Hall at the University of Toronto in the mid 80's. After some blistering speed work, my buddy said to me, somewhat sarcastically, "Do you think he can paly any faster?"

 

AL D heard that comment, pointed it out to the crowd, and said, yeah he could play faster. he then did the same piece again, about 50% quicker.

 

It was a boring wankfest. I read the descriptor "sonic bukkake" on another forum. That description applies.

 

The only thing I really remember about that gig, other than the above, was that the roadie used a new combination of expletives when he was setting up Al D's synclavier rig and got a shock with an arc bright enought to weld with. The guy finished the job, so I guess he was all right, but I've NEVER heard swearing like that. This guy was a pro!!!!!!

Peace,

 

Paul

 

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Yeah, I find DiMeola to be extremely boring. Much more so than McLaughlin or any other famous fusion player. He has butchered so much great music by Chick Corea and Astor Piazzolla that it's almost unforgivable. But at the same time, he has recorded some nice stuff, including what he titled "Song of the Pharaoh Kings" (not sure if this is the original title), which has the same main melody as one of Corea's "Children's Songs". There have been other tracks from his recordings I've liked.

 

I saw him live w/ Jean Luc Ponty and Stanley Clarke [i think] in 1995. His speed was amazing, but that stupid synth 'bird' sound of his, and his muted lines get OLD REALLY FAST. After a bit, it was like: "yeah, dude, you're fast and have an immense ego--I get the point!". Yup, that quick palm muting drives me crazy, to be honest.

 

I stopped listening to him shortly after that. Now that I'm playing the electric again, I may go ahead and study his version of that Chick Corea tune.

"Without music, life would be a mistake."

--from 'Beyond Good and Evil', by Friedrich Nietzsche

 

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Well, I can say his tone on that video is much better than back in the 70's. But the fact that he's in love with himself has been obvious since back then too. You could almost wish he wasn't as good as he is so he could be ignored...

Always remember that you�re unique. Just like everyone else.

 

 

 

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The fusion guitar of Di Meola, McLaughlin and those '70s cats is definitely an acquired taste. I enjoy it in small doses at a time.

 

I remember listening to Di Meola's Scenario record back in my college days when my roommate would ask me if I was feeling alright because of it :freak::D .

 

Interestingly, Di Meola developed his trademark muted tone because he practiced until late in the night and was muting his strings out of necessity not to wake up everybody else in the house. This habit stuck and he became recognized for that sound.

 

His rythmic skills are truly top-notch. Further than his awesome technique, I mostly appreciate the cinematic sense of drama displayed in his compositions and playing.

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attitude wise he is a real ass, though. I remember at a clinic the sound wasn't right and he was cussing through the microphone until they got the sound right and wouldn't play.

 

I understand not playing until the soundment get it right, but cussing through the mic in public where there are kids is reprehensible.

 

Good Player, serious ass. It's like he thinks he has the right to be a pompous dork because he can alternate pick muted 64th Notes and you can't

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I am impressed with his speed because he was an innovator for shredding.

 

By today's standard, I don't think what he is doing is groundbreakingly difficult.

 

But that doesn't say much. A million guys can shred now.

 

Technique is such a broad term. It covers so many areas, not just how fast you are. It is a difficult thing to analyze because it means so many different things.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Gotta say that I'm relatively ignorant of Dimeola but after watching that clip, I 'd say 2 things:

 

1. He can play very, very well.

2. I can't see myself every cueing that clip up again. Boring and cheesy (maybe cuz it's 1988) on so many levels.

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I saw DiMeola probably at the height of his popularity at a 2,000 seater hall around the time of the Elegant Gypsy album.

 

The group UK with Holdsworth on guitar openend up for him and got a lukewarm reception.

 

I thought Holdsworth's playing was so colorful, fluid, unique and musical that night. Then Al comes on strutting the stage playing his fast scale patterns with the crowd going wild like he was a Rock Star. I couldn't get into it.

 

I had a brief exchange with a guy at the concert where I said how much I liked Holdsworth's playing, and he said "ehhh, DiMeola is better, he picks every note".

 

I thought that was pretty telling and indicative of the general crowd response. The guy I was talking to was obviously a guitar player and was caught up in the "chops are everything" mentality. Of course picking every note is technically more difficult than playing legato a la Holdsworth, but then there's the actual music.....

Just a pinch between the geek and chum

 

 

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