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Irish Fiddle Tunes


Tone Taster

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Man, For triplet picking skill, ya just can't beat 'em. I've been playing the Irish washerwoman for years tryin' to jack the tempo up on it for years.

 

I believe that Irish folk does not deserve the recognition it should as being a valid influence on american Music Heritage

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I have a cut on a CD collage sent me that has this most AMAZING Irish fiddle playing in a rock context.. they even sang in what I assume to be Gaelic. I would love to learn some of those licks on guitar and/or mandolin.. and enjoy trying. Even if it's not what they played, exactly, it's new stuff to add to my repertoire in other contexts!

 

There are a lot of fine Irish musicians out there.

I just don't have the time and money to buy lots of CDs by artists I've never heard, in hopes of finding good stuff.

 

Any recommendations!

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I have a cut on a CD collage sent me that has this most AMAZING Irish fiddle playing in a rock context.. they even sang in what I assume to be Gaelic. I would love to learn some of those licks on guitar and/or mandolin.. and enjoy trying. Even if it's not what they played, exactly, it's new stuff to add to my repertoire in other contexts!

 

There are a lot of fine Irish musicians out there.

I just don't have the time and money to buy lots of CDs by artists I've never heard, in hopes of finding good stuff.

 

Any recommendations!

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When I was at the Air Force Academy we used to go down to Colorado Springs and a place called "The Golden Bee" which reminds me of the pubs I saw in rural England: small, classy, and friendly. (It is at The Broadmoor Hotel, which is decidely very upscale.) There I was introduced to the "yard" (you got an embroidered bumble bee for each one you downed) and Irish music. They had some great duets and trios play that place and I was duly impressed. Still love to hear it now and again...

 

http://www.cosportbikeclub.org/uploads/1GoldenBeeLRG.jpg

 

http://images.wcities.com/www.wcities.com/cityrecords/269594.jpg

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Originally posted by Darby McCaputo:

...I believe that Irish folk does not deserve the recognition it should as being a valid influence on american Music Heritage

No offense, Caputo, but Irish music gets a lot of recognition for its' impact on American folk music and Bluegrass music. Maybe you have to live in areas with large Irish communities to understand, but the Irish are far from forgotten in their influence here.

 

Head to Milwaukee for Irish Fest, Boston, New York, Chicago.. ;)

 

Which reminds me of my annual St. Patty's day quote:

 

"If they can dye the Chicago River green one day every year, why can't they dye it blue the other 364?" by ?

 

:D

It's easiest to find me on Facebook. Neil Bergman

 

Soundclick

fntstcsnd

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Originally posted by fantasticsound:

Originally posted by Darby McCaputo:

...I believe that Irish folk does not deserve the recognition it should as being a valid influence on american Music Heritage

No offense, Caputo, but Irish music gets a lot of recognition for its' impact on American folk music and Bluegrass music. Maybe you have to live in areas with large Irish communities to understand, but the Irish are far from forgotten in their influence here.

 

Head to Milwaukee for Irish Fest, Boston, New York, Chicago.. ;)

 

Which reminds me of my annual St. Patty's day quote:

 

"If they can dye the Chicago River green one day every year, why can't they dye it blue the other 364?" by ?

 

:D

Maybe i should not have been so general. You are right that it is recogged in certain Areas of the Union, but you don't see many music history books or documentaries or official Encyclopedic texts give it so called "formal" recognition and research as say African field hollers for jazz and the Euro classical influence. I have taken a few college classes regarding history of American Music, and it seems deficient in the area of Irish Folk and even bluegras being roots music.

 

To go in to contoversial OT land at the risk of being snuffed out by the Orwellian influence; Most history classes don't like to teach that there were Irish slaves (white slaves) in america either OR that there were Black Confederate soldiers who wanted to retain the sovereignty of the Confederacy. It just doesn't jibe well with the socialistic agenda being propagated by the managed media/education establishment

 

No apologies forthcoming

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Originally posted by fantasticsound:

Originally posted by Darby McCaputo:

...I believe that Irish folk does not deserve the recognition it should as being a valid influence on american Music Heritage

No offense, Caputo, but Irish music gets a lot of recognition for its' impact on American folk music and Bluegrass music. Maybe you have to live in areas with large Irish communities to understand, but the Irish are far from forgotten in their influence here.

 

Head to Milwaukee for Irish Fest, Boston, New York, Chicago.. ;)

 

Which reminds me of my annual St. Patty's day quote:

 

"If they can dye the Chicago River green one day every year, why can't they dye it blue the other 364?" by ?

 

:D

man you left out my home of Nova Scotia, and the whole east coast of Canada. we are big on that.
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Here's some recognition...

It was the singers & musicians of the British Isles who first brought the interval of the third to prominence in European music.

IIRC, this was circa the late Baroque period but the century doesn't matter as much as that it occured & whence the source.

European music practices were always a mix of folk elements & what the Church allowed in proper society & they were always evolving but this most evocative element, which we today think of as a primary determinant of any music's mood, came from the folk traditions of the English, Scots & Irish.

 

I'll go further.

Mostly we think of the popular music that's grown up in the Americas as being a meld of other cultures with a big tip o' the hat going to African influences & that's certainly true.

Jazz, blues, most of the music we hear in modern times around the world has been shaded by the mix that developed from the forced slamming together of several cultures in the Americas.

We generally give credit for the "blues" to the flatted third that can be heard in a lot of African musics (although it's not any more common in Africa than the diatonic third...it's just another color).

 

Have you ever noticed something that's distictively different about the musics that developed in N America compared to the musics that developed in S America or the Caribbean?

Both areas had great influxes of the same tribal groups from Africa & both N America & Latin America had some (generally uncredited) influences from their indigenous Indian populations.

Both had downtrodden enslaved populaces that had lots of sad stuff to sing about.

Both N American music & Latin American music made greater use of percussion & rhythmic variation than ever was the case in Europe.

 

What's distinctively different about them, however, is that the flatted third is hardly as widespread in the musics that developed in Latin America. I cannot offer any distinct citations for this partly because I think it's a relatively new observation but all you have to do is conduct some listening tests of your own.

What would have made the difference (presuming that I'm correct in what I suggest) ?

Clearly the most significant difference would've been the presence of not just African musical traditions that made greater use of the altered third (along with it's use by Native Americans who, I repeat were a greater influence on music than we usually allow) but the presence of folk musicians from the British Isles who were steeped in the use of the third as an emotionally expressive interval!

 

Trust me, I'm not trying for any theft of credit from African cultures for their undeniable contributions in many, many ways.

However I don't think there's much music in grew Latin America that sounds much like the blues, except to the degree that it imitates N American blues & jazz & I am hard pressed to think of what the other reasons for this might be.

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Originally posted by Eric Iverson:

Any recommendations!

I am not an expert (or really all that enthralled) particulary on British folk music.

You can hear some excellent & very expressive fiddle playing in the Nordic traditions, too.

When younger I had several recordings in a series from Nonesuch Recs. called the "Explorer" series. That featured representaive recordings from all around the world.

It's where I first heard gamelan music & also multiphonic Tibetan singing, Amwrican Indian "tumbling strain" styles & much more.

I'm sure you could find those recordings or other similar stuff like what Shanahachie Rec.s offers (offered?)

 

For a mix of British folk music with rock style, though, there's no better choice than Leige & Leif an old record by Fairport Convention.

Not only does it offer a marvelous mix of styles in single songs but it's one of the most stunningly dynamic recordings you'll hear.

A true lesson in how a great band tunes into each other for dramatic effect.

Plus you'll hear the exact places that cats like Jimmy Page & Pete Townshend took their inspriation for things like Led Zep 4 & Who's Next.

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John Doyle plays some great fiddle tunes on guitar, and has an amazing voice. his album Evening Comes Early is one of my favorite albums of any genre, absolutely beautiful.

 

Solas (John Doyles' former band) is also highly recommended, Seamus Eagan is an incredible whistle/flute player

 

Malloy, Brady, Peoples for the real deal fiddle music - no holds barred, and no b*llsh*t.

 

Altan for a little outside fiddle music with an exceptional singer, and some haunting flute work.

 

Pierre Bensusan plays unbelievable celtic fingerstyle on his first couple of albums. how many other guitarists did Michael Hedges name songs after? 'nuff said.

 

for more fingerstyle celtic guitar stuff, check out Duck Baker & Pat Kirkley.

 

that should get ya started :wave:

 

BTW my last name is McGinnis, so i can speak on this subject with authority :D

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Originally posted by GuitArthur Guinness:

...man you left out my home of Nova Scotia, and the whole east coast of Canada. we are big on that.

You Canadians still bucking to be recognized as Americans by us U.S. citizens? ;):D

 

In addition, it should be noted that Country music gives great credit, as do Bluegrassers to Irish music for the direct adaptation of the Celtic fiddle style to these modern, American genres.

It's easiest to find me on Facebook. Neil Bergman

 

Soundclick

fntstcsnd

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Originally posted by Eric Iverson:

Thanks, d, for the recommendations.. yet ONE more thing I'd like to check out.. the only problems are time and money... but thanks anyway, and after all, I DID ask!

I know exactly what you mean....but trust me, find a copy of this recording (cintact me via PM & I'll arrange to send you a copy) & you'll not even want to listen to anything else for a good long while---& that's coming from a heavy R&B fan!
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I once knew Angie O'Plasty

And I don't wanna say anything nasty!

Yes I ran from the room when she would fart

But Lord, did that lady have a great big heart!

 

Of course, this is just a joke... but I would love to collaborate with you on a song, about Angie or any other lady.. or maybe even about Christ!

 

I guess I'm a shameless collaborator by nature.. there are a LOT of you I wish I had the time, money, and opportunity to collaborate with!

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