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Silly Chord Question


Warthog

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OK, I'm too lazy to look this up myself:

 

For years I've played this chord shape and knew what it was at one time but forgot. I'm trying to fit it in to my music but am unsure of the chord:

 

7 High E

7

7

6

7 A

X

 

It works on any fret. Thanks, in advance...

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I'll get pedantic here, but this is a thought process that helps me, and it's only mildly off topic. (Bluesape brought 9th in place of 7th chords.)

 

In the Key of C, both the V7 chord, (G7), and the vii-7b5, (B-7b5) chord are dominant chords.

 

The notes in G7 are: G B D F

 

The notes in B-7b5 are: B D F A

 

The notes in G9 are: G B D F A

 

Notice anything???? The notes of a B-7b5 are the upper structure of a G9 chord. They are fully interchangable with each other.

 

This works really cool when the bass player catches on. Instead of the root motion of the notes going from G to C ( V to I), the root motion is B to C (vii to I). Chromatic motion can be a very powerful way to move chord changes along.

Peace,

 

Paul

 

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That chord is so urban-knight, it pretty much lives in either funk or up-town blues!

 

It's the City-Chord. ;)

 

Now, the sign said, "Silly Chord Question". That's clearly a well-oiled metropolitan city-slicker chord.

 

http://www.musicplayer.com/ubb/icons/icon3.gif Now, THIS is a Silly Chord, in action, to boot:

 

xx6767 * xx7878 * xx8989 * xx9|10|9|10 *

xx10|11|10|11 * xx11|12|11|12 * xx12|13|12|13 * xx13|14|13|14

 

(Ascending 1/8th-note rhythm, building frantically in feel; follow immediately with alarmed shriek and plummeting crash)

 

The Cartoon-Chord! :D:thu:

Ask yourself- What Would Ren and Stimpy Do?

 

~ Caevan James-Michael Miller-O'Shite ~

_ ___ _ Leprechaun, Esquire _ ___ _

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You can also move your pinky one fret higher and get the E7#9 or the infamous "Hendrix Chord"

 

I realized the need to clarify... instead of barring the 3 high strings, you can play this:

 

5th string, 7th fret, middle finger

4th string, 6th fret, index finger

3rd string, 7th fret, ring finger

2nd string, 8th fret, pinky

 

..to get the E7#9

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Originally posted by Caevan O'Shite:

Now, THIS is a Silly Chord, in action, to boot:

 

xx6767 * xx7878 * xx8989 * xx9|10|9|10 *

xx10|11|10|11 * xx11|12|11|12 * xx12|13|12|13 * xx13|14|13|14

 

(Ascending 1/8th-note rhythm, building frantically in feel; follow immediately with alarmed shriek and plummeting crash)

 

The Cartoon-Chord! :D:thu:

Actually, what you want to do is climb that three frets at a time, so you have the same diminshed chord climbing through its inversions. ;) THAT'S the "girl tied to the train tracks chords"

 

As for your E9, the second string is the ninth, so slide your pinky up and play:

 

X7678X = E(#9) and play Purple Haze

 

or do

 

X7676X = E(b9) and play smoky jazz.

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Originally posted by Billster:

"Actually, what you want to do is climb that three frets at a time, so you have the same diminshed chord climbing through its inversions. ;)

 

THAT'S the "girl tied to the train tracks chords"..."

 

You are correct, sir! :idea::D:cool:

Ask yourself- What Would Ren and Stimpy Do?

 

~ Caevan James-Michael Miller-O'Shite ~

_ ___ _ Leprechaun, Esquire _ ___ _

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<>

 

Wow, so it wasn't just my garage band in the 60s which called it the Hendrix chord. We also, absolutely incorrectly, sometimes referred to it as a major/minor chord. Years later, and a good deal of education later, I found out it was the 7#9 chord.

 

Scott Fraser

Scott Fraser
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There is a major/minor chord, though that name is confusing. Play a C minor chord like 8 10 10 8 8 8. Now move the third string down a half step so you got 8 10 9 8 8 8. It's a minor triad with a major seventh added to it. Or a minor seventh chord with the seventh raised a half step.

 

You don't see it on its own very often, but it's a common passing thing. If you start with a minor triad and then walk down from the octave in half steps, you got a minor chord - minor/major - minor 7 -minor 6 pattern. It often shows up as a montuno figure in Latin music. A guitar teacher I had once called it "the thing going down." I suspect it has some more official name but I don't know it.

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<>

 

As part of a natural minor scale, would it be less confusing to refer to as a natural minor chord or Aeolian chord or something, or is this a standard terminology? Also, take off the low E string & it's a G7 sus4. A major/minor chord seems like something Schoenberg would come up with.

A variation with a 13, like X X (or O) 4 5 5 4 in the key of A is something I do all the time in pseudo jazz jamming.

 

Scott Fraser

Scott Fraser
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The minor major 7th chord is famous in two places that I know of. (It's belongs in both the harmonic minor and melodic minor scales.)

 

1) It is the final chord to the original Spiderman theme.

 

2) It is the chord that plays when blood flows down the screen when you get killed in the "Goldeneye" video game.

Peace,

 

Paul

 

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Originally posted by Bluesape:

Yup - they beat me to it - I find myself using 9ths in place of 7ths a lot in bluesy stuff - they just sound a tad more elegant to my ear.

I've actually cycled around to playing 7ths again much of the time, BluesPrimate. The 9th chord, especially this shape, is ubiquitous among guitar players and I'm tired of hearing it, even from myself.

 

13th chords, now - that's uptown! :D

 

 

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first let me say i am tired from working last night, and i am too lazy to figure this out...

ok, if i add an A maj triad on top of an E chord what does that give me? is it a 13th chord?

that would be the 1st, 3rd, 5th, 11th, and 13th right? which intervals are not needed? the 5th?

or am i overtired?

i have to find my Larry Carlton issue of GP, he gives some cool info on stacking triads.

and the Pat Martino issue is major cool with his breakdown of note changes on diminished and augmented chords and how they create other chords from only moving one note at a time.

i am rambling because i should be in bed...sorry

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Originally posted by GuitArthur Guinness:

ok, if i add an A maj triad on top of an E chord what does that give me? is it a 13th chord?

that would be the 1st, 3rd, 5th, 11th, and 13th right? which intervals are not needed? the 5th?

or am i overtired?

Nope, it would be an E add 11/13.

 

In order for it to be an E13, the chord HAS to have the 7th in it, in this case the note D.

 

Depending on how it is voiced, you might call it an E6 add 11.

 

I'm not a fan of stacking triads. I do like stacking major 7 chords. At a piano try Gmaj7 over Fmaj7. (That's the last chord in Chicago's "Colour My World".)

Peace,

 

Paul

 

----------------------

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<

 

(Note to self - drink coffee BEFORE posting in the morning.) My bad, I added the F to get the G7sus, then forgot it wasn't in the original example, then mixed up the natural & melodic minor. Still, I think I'd call the chord in question a 'Minor (major 7)' rather than a 'Major/Minor', but I'm not a music teacher, so I could be out to lunch.

 

Scott Fraser

Scott Fraser
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<

 

(Note to self - drink coffee BEFORE posting in the morning.) My bad, I added the F to get the G7sus, then forgot it wasn't in the original example, then mixed up the natural & melodic minor. Still, I think I'd call the chord in question a 'Minor (major 7)' rather than a 'Major/Minor', but I'm not a music teacher, so I could be out to lunch.

 

Scott Fraser

Scott Fraser
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Why wouldn't that be called a sus4? (Not disputing, just trying to figure it all out.) For that matter, when does a 6th become a 13th?
It's not a sus4 because the third is in the chord too. Sus4 is when the 4th replaces the third, thereby suspending the resolution of the chord -- it "wants" to fall back to a third for release.

 

Similarly a chord is called a 6th when the 6th is ther in place of the seventh. If the 7th is present, the 6th is an extension and therefore considered "above" the basic block-chord form, so it's called a 13th regardless of how it's actually voiced.

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<

Similarly a chord is called a 6th when the 6th is ther in place of the seventh. If the 7th is present, the 6th is an extension and therefore considered "above" the basic block-chord form, so it's called a 13th regardless of how it's actually voiced.>>

 

Man, for the first time this is now completely clear. Excellent. I thanks you mightily.

Scott Fraser

Scott Fraser
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9th 11th and 13th's are are same as 2nd's , 4th's and 6th's. For piano they were usually voiced in the right hand, upper octave but on guitar they might sometimes be be played on the lower notes...usually as top notes though.

 

Yes, if the 4th replaces the 3rd it is said to be a suspended chord.

 

Minor/Major 7th also know as Minor Natural 7th

 

When voicing a #9 chord you will want to place the #9 above the 3rd. When voicing a +11 chord with a 5th in it, place the +11 above the 5th

 

All this stuff you guys have gone over is great.

 

 

Here is a nice ringy open EmM7

 

O 7 5 8 O O or add the B octave O 7 5 8 O 7

 

or another EmM7

 

12 10 9 8 O O

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All this talk of interesting chords reminds me of several songs I played on piano this weekend I discovered, quite by accident, how one chord was actually the same fingering with a different bass note. It was a complex chord and, no doubt their was at least one "missing" tone in the voicing I played, but it sounded exactly right as is.

 

I love when I discover voicings like that. Simple to play when you realize the true name of the chord belies a simple triad or 4 tone chord voicing you already know with a substituation in the bass. :thu:

It's easiest to find me on Facebook. Neil Bergman

 

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fntstcsnd

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