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Create a portolio of vintage guitars and musical equipment


rw2003

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Let's try to have a little fun with this...

 

We've all seen a dramatic run-up/rise in the values of all of sorts of collectible stuff in the past decade or so. Many of the vintage guitars and amps that we love and would want to own have risen in value so much that they are now unaffordable to most folks of average means.

 

Imagine that you could buy and sell vintage musical equipment as easily as you could stocks via your online brokerage account. What would you be investing in??? The "Dow Jones" of music gear would be filled with blue-chip investments such as original 50's and early 60's Fender Stratocasters, Gibson Les Pauls and late 60's 100 watt Marshall plexi heads, etc. But while these items are almost sure bets as investments, their values have already seen tremendous appreciation.

 

What would be some good "growth" or "value" investments where there is still some significant potential of appreciation in value?

 

For instance, I would consider some Marshall amps such as the early 70s Super Leads and the early 80s JCM 800s to be possible "buys."

 

Yeah, these assets may not pay regular cash dividends but they would be a heck of lot more fun to own!!!

"Spend all day doing nothing

But we sure do it well" - Huck Johns from 'Oh Yeah'

Click to Listen to Oh yeah

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Hey Chad - check out the sunburst! :D

 

Gretsch's, Martins, and certain Rickies should keep climbing, and Guilds are bound to eventually creep up as their equality to Gibson becomes more accepted. PRS's are already doing OK, even though they're not really vintage yet.

 

Hofners, Hagstrums, Yammies, Taks, and others could be a while yet, but G&Ls, Taylors, and Larivees are already bluechips. Small, boutique items: Manzers, Grafs, McInturffs, Collings, etc should eventually get the recognition they deserve, and their rarity will be a plus then.

 

The practice of resurrecting hallowed names from the past and taking them overseas, such as D'Angelico, D'Aquisto, Stromberg, etc., is bound to hurt the value of all models under those names, even though very high quality pieces are being built, just as the Epihone name has taken a dive in value for all but accurately verifiable prewar items. This prostitution of the name is bound to make investment grade Fenders harder to track at some point, along with Hamer, ESP, Jackson, and others who allow outsourcing abroad.

 

I would also expect to see other British amp makers get their due, as many of them truly are the equal of Marshall or beyond in terms of tone and quality (digitalis and nitro pause for the blasphemy induced palpitations, sorry). Mesas, Riveras, and Soldanos are already highly sought after, and I expect we will see Dr Zs doing well, among others, like THD, Allesandro, Bogner, and Randall.

Never a DUH! moment! Well, almost never. OK, OK! Sometimes never!
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Gretsch White Penguin

Gretsch champagne Jet

Gibson Firebird complete series (original run)

D'Angelico New Yorker

Gibson Flying Vee (original run)

Fender nocaster

Country Club

Super 400

 

just to name a few.

"I believe that entertainment can aspire to be art, and can become art, but if you set out to make art you're an idiot."

 

Steve Martin

 

Show business: we're all here because we're not all there.

 

 

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How long will this last though? Nothing on this planet has a true, intrinsic value.Even gold is just a metal to those that don't consider it a precious commodity. The only true value of things is the price people are willing to pay for them.

 

So I wonder what will happen to the old Les Pauls and so on in about 50 years when most of the rich investors have died off? Those collections will probably become like somebody's pianola collection. You could have a mini museum off the highway, but nobody's going to go crazy over them.

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Dunno, Vince - I expect that the guitar will still be a popular, widely played instrument. I've never been to a pianola recital. I imagine the music will live on for generations, and the values should hold up.
Never a DUH! moment! Well, almost never. OK, OK! Sometimes never!
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Originally posted by Bluesape:

Dunno, Vince - I expect that the guitar will still be a popular, widely played instrument. I've never been to a pianola recital. I imagine the music will live on for generations, and the values should hold up.

Yeah, but whether ppl will still be as interested in a 50s guitar... I really don't know. Sounds like a boomer thing.
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- Gibson L5CES :love:

- Gibson BB King "Lucille" :love:

- Fender Stratocaster Signature Hank Marvin (almost impossibile to find) :love:

 

In general, you cannot go wrong with a hollow body or a semiacoustic by Gibson or Gretsch.

Korg PA3X Pro 76 and Kronos 61, Roland G-70, Integra 7 and BK7-m, Casio PX-5S, Fender Stratocaster with Fralin pickups, Fender Stratocaster with Kinman pickups, 1965 Gibson SG Standard
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http://www.penumbra.co.nz/images/40thstrat.jpghttp://freespace.virgin.net/john.blackman4/images/mar2.jpghttp://freespace.virgin.net/john.blackman4/images/mar1.jpg
Korg PA3X Pro 76 and Kronos 61, Roland G-70, Integra 7 and BK7-m, Casio PX-5S, Fender Stratocaster with Fralin pickups, Fender Stratocaster with Kinman pickups, 1965 Gibson SG Standard
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Bruce Welch in action...

 

http://www.penumbra.co.nz/images/brucepic.jpg

Korg PA3X Pro 76 and Kronos 61, Roland G-70, Integra 7 and BK7-m, Casio PX-5S, Fender Stratocaster with Fralin pickups, Fender Stratocaster with Kinman pickups, 1965 Gibson SG Standard
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Originally posted by Dreamer:

http://www.penumbra.co.nz/images/40thstrat.jpghttp://freespace.virgin.net/john.blackman4/images/mar2.jpghttp://freespace.virgin.net/john.blackman4/images/mar1.jpg

Blimey!!! Even Squiers are trying to get big prices.

 

G.

"When the power of love overcomes the love of power the World will know Peace": Jimi Hendrix

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The Geoff - blame Caevan!!!

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Originally posted by Geoff B.:

Didn't realise you were another Shads fan, Dreamer.

 

:thu:

 

Geoff

Geoff, here is my next purchase: Fender Stratocaster Classic '50 (MIM):

 

http://www.thomann.de/prodbilder/184960.jpg

 

I am waiting for the "Fiesta Red" to arrive; right now they have only the "Daphne Blue":

 

http://www.fender.com/products/prod_images/guitars/0131002304_md.jpg

 

very nice, but not like Hank's one... then I will maybe replace the pups with a set of Kinman FV-HMS

http://www.kinman.com/images/inside/ourProducts/pickupPacksHank.gif

not a true Hank Marvin Signature, but for the price I guess I cannot complain too much... ;)

Korg PA3X Pro 76 and Kronos 61, Roland G-70, Integra 7 and BK7-m, Casio PX-5S, Fender Stratocaster with Fralin pickups, Fender Stratocaster with Kinman pickups, 1965 Gibson SG Standard
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Ya know, I'm not so sure that the "collector guitar" market is such a great idea.

 

My local Long & McQuade has a Clapton 335 on the wall for $15 000. It's clearly tageted at the Baby Boomers who have an emotional connection to Clapton, and that time period in general. And, as chance would have it, the Baby Boomers are now at that age where they have the time and money to spend on something silly like a Clapton 335.

 

But in two or three generations, who will have that kind of money????? My guess is the Gen X or Gen Y group, and will they have the emotional connection to Clapton to want to spend $50 000+ on a guitar that only looks like something Clapton played? I'm guessing not.

 

I'd put my money in real estate, They can't build any more land.

Peace,

 

Paul

 

----------------------

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Originally posted by rockincyanblues:

But in two or three generations, who will have that kind of money????? My guess is the Gen X or Gen Y group, and will they have the emotional connection to Clapton to want to spend $50 000+ on a guitar that only looks like something Clapton played? I'm guessing not.

Exactly.

 

Whose guitar are they meant to buy anyway? I don't think anybody in the year 2525 will be spending hundreds of thousands on a guitar just 'cause the dude from Nickelback played that model.

 

And I can't imagine kids today dreaming of owning a 50s LP just like the one played either.

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Well, the Clapton 335 is an example of an item that has already reached its peak, so it's not a good idea to buy one now; another example is the Jimmy Page Les Paul Standard, that right now commands more than 10.000 dollars.

But the Gibson BBKing Lucille is a good example of a "blue chip" that has yet to reach that peak: right now in Europe it sells for about 2600 euros (3386 dollars) and I am ready to bet that in five or ten years it will reach the same price as the others two guitars mentioned.

Korg PA3X Pro 76 and Kronos 61, Roland G-70, Integra 7 and BK7-m, Casio PX-5S, Fender Stratocaster with Fralin pickups, Fender Stratocaster with Kinman pickups, 1965 Gibson SG Standard
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I don't see that happening, Dreamer.

 

First, lots of kids today are listening to classic rock, so Jimmy Page may very well be embraced by the next generation and the next.

 

B.B. King Lucille's have been around a lot longer than the Jimmy Page, have been built in much larger numbers and haven't appreciated more than the average collectable.

 

The Jimmy Page was hugely popular as a collectable right from the get-go because of its' limited availability, connection to JP, and unique electronics. It also was delivered with several pieces of collateral paperwork. It was designed as an investment from the start, and its' value continues to rise, albeit somewhat more slowly than a few years ago.

 

I love the B.B. King, it does have somewhat unique electronics in the Varitone circuit (albeit not exclusive, as with the JP setup), it sports gold appointments and the micro-tuner tailpiece, but it isn't one of the more popular guitars. It will retain its' value, even appreciate, but it will likely never hold the value of the JP.

It's easiest to find me on Facebook. Neil Bergman

 

Soundclick

fntstcsnd

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Originally posted by fantasticsound:

I don't see that happening, Dreamer.

I see and understand your points, still... let's resurrect this thread five or maybe ten years from now, ok? ;)

If you are right, I'll buy you a beer... or whatever you like.

Korg PA3X Pro 76 and Kronos 61, Roland G-70, Integra 7 and BK7-m, Casio PX-5S, Fender Stratocaster with Fralin pickups, Fender Stratocaster with Kinman pickups, 1965 Gibson SG Standard
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Frisbees.

The Wham-O company has been sold to a Hong Kong concern. If you have a pre-buyout Frisbee, hang on to it.

Seriously, I wouldn`t be interested in that for real because you can`t-or shouldn`t-play investments. That would take the fun, if not the very purpose in having it away.

However the Music Man John Petrucci sig would be a good bet due to its unique features.

Same old surprises, brand new cliches-

 

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www.soundclick.com/bands/pagemusic.cfm?bandid=602491

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I don't usually go for nostalgia and generally I hate when people say, "they don't make 'em like they used to", but vintage guitars are the exception to the rule. Vintage instruments were made during a time when instrument quality woods were easier to come by. In particular, high quality mahogany and rosewood. It's not going to matter whether or not Gen X or Gen Y wants a guitar just like Eric Clapton played ... if a vintage instrument is a quality instrument, then there will be a demand. Consider the so-called "pre-war" Martins ... do you think demand for pre-war Martins is entirely driven by 80 year olds that want to play the same guitar that Hank Williams Sr. played? No. The demand is there because they are rare, quality instruments.
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It's amazing the used guitars I could have bought in the early 70s for 100 bucks that are worth 10-20 times that amount. The problem is 100 bucks was a lot of for me then and I also didn't view them as investments but as instruments that I just wanted to get my hands on and play like a rock star.
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