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OT: Thought for the Day--Abbey Road Puzzle


Pappy P

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Did all the songs on side two of Abbey Road run together because the Beatles could automatically start playing another song?

 

Or

 

Where all the songs on side two of Abbey Road spliced together so that the radios stations would have to play that whole side of the album?

(because noone wants to pick the needle up to soon or too late)

 

I know it doesn't matter but it still makes you wonder.

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They were recorded separately and edited together. In fact, the last song on the album, "Her Majesty", was left on accidently (at first) when an engineer edited an outtake onto the end of a reel. The chord you hear at the beginning of HM is the end of "Polythene Pam". You can program your CD player to play it where it originally was. Try it
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Originally posted by Pappadopalus:

Did all the songs on side two of Abbey Road run together because the Beatles could automatically start playing another song?

 

Or

 

Where all the songs on side two of Abbey Road spliced together so that the radios stations would have to play that whole side of the album?

(because noone wants to pick the needle up to soon or too late)

 

I know it doesn't matter but it still makes you wonder.

Later Beatles songs were recorded in bits and pieces, and assembled afterwards.

 

The order of the songs on all Beatles albums were decided upon after the songs were finished. At times orders were tried out, then minds were changted and re-ordering was done. I've assembled quite a few albums over the years and to some artists, the order of songs is critical. We make up a 'finished' order, only ti have the artists come back again and again after listening, making changes in that order.

 

This happened on Abbey Road, as was mentioned above. It was no accident though, someone just changed their minds about the order, and the decision to cut yet leave a bit of one song on the other was intentional.

 

When I was in production, we would get promo albums. There were DJ copies of certain records... ones that had long continuous 'suites' of music... that had been broken up into smaller, radio-friendly chunks, with fade outs and bands of silence between. I can't say that there were Beatles records like this, because I'm not that old. But such LPs did exist.

 

If you want to know what the Beatles did do during recording, the book "The Beatles Recording Sessions" is a must have. There are a lot of myths and half-truths floating around. Whenever possible I defaut to this reference as being, if not 100% accurate, at least the most accurate information, agreed upon by several independent sources, and assembled by a well-respected journalist.

 

Bill

"I believe that entertainment can aspire to be art, and can become art, but if you set out to make art you're an idiot."

 

Steve Martin

 

Show business: we're all here because we're not all there.

 

 

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A few of the songs in the medley were recorded without segues and taped as one straight through recording, at least according to Mark Lewisohn, king of all Beatle recording knowledge. These included "Golden Slumbers/Carry that Weight", "Sun King/Mean Mr. Mustard", "Polythene Pam/She Came in Through the Bathroom Window."
John
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From what I read, the side with Octopus' Garden and I Want You{She's So Heavy}) was set up to suit McCCartney, who wanted a lot of radio-friendly pop hits, and the side with all the songs running together was set up to suit Lennon, who was in his "I'm a F****** artist & Yoko is a supreme intellectual!" phase at the time.

Always remember that you�re unique. Just like everyone else.

 

 

 

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Sadly, the story Picker lays out is true, only the patrons of each side were flipped 2 protect the dislexic.

The clear weight of McCrassney's Nvolvemnet on the medley material is demonstrable.

It's a bit glib 2 divide the Beatles 2 main protagonists so much, though, not just 4 style but 4 Nvolment N each others work more than they maight later've wished 2 portray.

 

As 2 the structural Ntent, I&I think it was all dynamic. Not the first time pop record had featured interlinked songs, so it wasn't sheer inovation & the "radiocan'tstopusnow,allthesongsareonecontinuosbit" idea is fun but hardly a foolproof gambit.

 

I&I think they just wanted it 2 sound that way.

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Originally posted by Bill@Welcome Home Studios:

...If you want to know what the Beatles did do during recording, the book "The Beatles Recording Sessions" is a must have. There are a lot of myths and half-truths floating around. Whenever possible I defaut to this reference as being, if not 100% accurate, at least the most accurate information, agreed upon by several independent sources, and assembled by a well-respected journalist.

 

Bill

Excellent post, Bill.

 

For those who haven't read "The Beatles Recording Sessions", it was conceived after a young balance engineer at Abbey Road was diagnosed with a terminal disease. He voiced his desire to find something worthwhile to work on in the time he had left. Someone at Abbey Road suggested he listen to all the tapes the Beatles recorded and document everything on them.

 

He did just that, and for some time he accompanied Geoff Emerick and George Martin when they gave speeches to answer the many, specific questions people asked about one recording session or another. Things long forgotten were often discovered in his notes. It wasn't until after he died that an administrative worker at Abbey Road spearheaded an effort to publish his notes as a book.

 

Mark Lewisohn was tapped to turn those notes into a coherent collection. Along the way he did more research and added information from outside sources, as well.

 

It's an amazing read, not only because of the detail gleaned from the tapes, but also because it documents what now, in hindsight, is readily apparent of the Beatles' relationships at each stage in the development of the group as well as their individual emotional state.

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Originally posted by Bill@Welcome Home Studios:

When I was in production, we would get promo albums. There were DJ copies of certain records... ones that had long continuous 'suites' of music... that had been broken up into smaller, radio-friendly chunks, with fade outs and bands of silence between. I can't say that there were Beatles records like this, because I'm not that old. But such LPs did exist.

That's incredible.

 

Back in the day, we used to be so conditioned by the legendary idiocy of radio DJs and it seems to me that we needn't have bothered?

 

There were all those "do's and don't's" such as "you can't have a double A side single because it'll just confuse the DJ. You have to have a good song and a completely shitty flipside so they'll realize which one they have to play" or "don't have silences in the song, otherwise they'll take it off the turntable before it's finished" and so on. So preproduction would have taken care of all that? Shucks... :rolleyes::(

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I used to get a kick out of the 'interview' albums. They'd send the DJs a list of questions, and the answers would be on LP, one answer per band. The idea was to make it sound as if you were interviewing the star at your station, when in truth they had probably never even heard of your station, let alone you.

 

I have some LPs of the Lost Lennon Tapes from Westwood One.

 

Bill

"I believe that entertainment can aspire to be art, and can become art, but if you set out to make art you're an idiot."

 

Steve Martin

 

Show business: we're all here because we're not all there.

 

 

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