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Royal Pain


Bluesape

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Just changed the 9V in my ESP(the one in my avatar). It was a retro-fit for the EMGs, and the battery was under the pickguard. I bought this axe used 10 years ago, so I could guess the battery lasted 15 years or more. Today I saw it for the first time - an Energizer, which I replaced it with as well. It turns out the Floyd bridge had to be raised way up, and the damn NECK had to come off for the Strat pickguard to clear! I managed to salvage the strings by just loosening them from the locking bridge and re-inserting them when the axe was back together.

 

One of the neck mounting screws wouldn't tighten back up, so I had to use the toothpick trick to shim it in tight. Maybe I'm just being grumpy, but what I set out to do should've taken no more than 15-20 minutes, but these unforseen obstacles(like the neck for chrissake!) made the job last over an hour.

 

My point here is, unless you're experienced, allow yourself some extra time to do any work like this, cuz' you're bound to run into a surprise or 2. :thu:

Never a DUH! moment! Well, almost never. OK, OK! Sometimes never!
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that sucks Reif.

you could have unlocked the nut and detuned the strings, lightly finger tightened the nut and removed the floyd springs, then lifted the trem and set the trem to the side to take off the pickguard.

your strings would still be attached to the trem and the nut would have held the strings enough to keep them from unwrapping at the tuners. since the strings are detuned there would have been enough slack to remove the trem. the trick is to pull on the strings when you detune them to keep them snug before retightening ( with fingers only) the nut to give you the slack needed to remove the trem.

you can do this with any guitar without a floyd if you employ a capo to do the job of holding those strings in place, while you remove the bridge.

od course it aint gonna happen on anything that strings through the body.

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Right, 'Zan, but the neck had to come off, which leads me to suspect it's not the original pickguard. It wouldn't budge while the neck was on. :eek: The neck is squared off at the end of the fretboard, not rounded like typical Fender necks, so I think it or the pickguard must have been swapped out before I got it. An ESP would be an odd replacement neck, though , wouldn't it? :idea:
Never a DUH! moment! Well, almost never. OK, OK! Sometimes never!
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Originally posted by Bejeeber:

That sounds like it'd be a stressful battery change to have to do in the middle of a gig!!! :P

Hah! :D A damn string change is stressful enough with the damn Floyd! Another reason to never take just one axe to a gig. :thu:
Never a DUH! moment! Well, almost never. OK, OK! Sometimes never!
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Originally posted by ellwood:

Originally posted by Bluesape:

Thanks Lee! :D I'll give that project my full attention in 2020 or so. :thu:

HAY NOW!!!! :rolleyes: Get those tools back out now Reif!! Just play the "V" untill it's all done! :D:cool:
Ummm......yeah. Oh....ummm....what was the name of that bridge in NYC you wanted to sell me? :D:D
Never a DUH! moment! Well, almost never. OK, OK! Sometimes never!
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I hate shit like that. WTF are manufacturers thinking? Why is it so hard to make stuff that's going to require some maintenance easy to get to? You can put a little plastic door over the battery so you can get to it. My Guild acoustic necessitates way loosening the strings to get to the battery. Not too bad, but I know a guy who's got a Charvel acoustic. The battery is in a little box on the top...you just pop it open and change the battery.

 

And, it's not just guitars. My son's car (a Chrysler Cirrus) had a dead battery in it a couple years ago. I went to look...WAITAF'nMINUTE, where's the f'n battery?

 

Get this shit...You have to take the left front TIRE off to get to the fucking battery.

 

Make these fucking designers do the work themselves, then they'll understand.

"Cisco Kid, was a friend of mine"
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Again, the EMGs were a retrofit by a previous owner, but I'm glad it's not a more frequent chore.

 

I know about those cars - I was sellin' Mopars when they came out. That was ostensibly a move to help achieve ideal weight distribution. There are boost points under the hood, but they're no help if the battery's fried.

Never a DUH! moment! Well, almost never. OK, OK! Sometimes never!
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another cool idea would be to cut the pickguard to make it two pieces so you could remove just the section at the lower horn. this would require fabricating just the removable section.

so that there would be no gap from the material that is removed by cutting.

route a pocket in the lower horn and then cut that section off to make a removable cover.

see? i don't mind butchering YOUR axe Reif. :D

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Originally posted by Tedster:

I hate shit like that. WTF are manufacturers thinking? Why is it so hard to make stuff that's going to require some maintenance easy to get to? You can put a little plastic door over the battery so you can get to it. My Guild acoustic necessitates way loosening the strings to get to the battery. Not too bad, but I know a guy who's got a Charvel acoustic. The battery is in a little box on the top...you just pop it open and change the battery.

 

And, it's not just guitars. My son's car (a Chrysler Cirrus) had a dead battery in it a couple years ago. I went to look...WAITAF'nMINUTE, where's the f'n battery?

 

Get this shit...You have to take the left front TIRE off to get to the fucking battery.

 

Make these fucking designers do the work themselves, then they'll understand.

Some G.M cars are under the back seat. :freak:
The story of life is quicker then the blink of an eye, the story of love is hello, goodbye.
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Originally posted by Tedster:

I hate shit like that. WTF are manufacturers thinking? Why is it so hard to make stuff that's going to require some maintenance easy to get to?...

Sometimes to make money for repairmen, sometimes because they care about getting the product to market rather than work out the kinks, sometimes... ;)

 

I'm still trying to figure out why Fender, among others, designed pickguards as mounting plates for electronics. :rolleyes: Fixing a bad connection or tightening a loose nut shouldn't require removing 15 screws for access. :rolleyes: My Peavey T-60 is the same design. A simple, rear access port could save all kinds of time. They could even keep the pickguard as is, for ease of manufacturing, but damn! I'm not about to mutilate my guitar attempting to fix a problem they should've worked out 30 years ago.

 

As for batteries, I love my L.R. Baggs ribbon p'up and preamp, but I'm mystified why they didn't include a battery door a la Takamine, etc. I'm not a Tak fan, but their battery door is, hands down, the best I've ever seen. A removable holder allows a 9 volt battery to be inserted only the correct orientation. It locks in place, but can be removed easily without tools. A fantastic design.

It's easiest to find me on Facebook. Neil Bergman

 

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Originally posted by fantasticsound:

Originally posted by Tedster:

I hate shit like that. WTF are manufacturers thinking? Why is it so hard to make stuff that's going to require some maintenance easy to get to?...

Sometimes to make money for repairmen, sometimes because they care about getting the product to market rather than work out the kinks, sometimes... ;)

 

I'm still trying to figure out why Fender, among others, designed pickguards as mounting plates for electronics. :rolleyes: Fixing a bad connection or tightening a loose nut shouldn't require removing 15 screws for access. :rolleyes: My Peavey T-60 is the same design. A simple, rear access port could save all kinds of time. They could even keep the pickguard as is, for ease of manufacturing, but damn! I'm not about to mutilate my guitar attempting to fix a problem they should've worked out 30 years ago.

 

As for batteries, I love my L.R. Baggs ribbon p'up and preamp, but I'm mystified why they didn't include a battery door a la Takamine, etc. I'm not a Tak fan, but their battery door is, hands down, the best I've ever seen. A removable holder allows a 9 volt battery to be inserted only the correct orientation. It locks in place, but can be removed easily without tools. A fantastic design.

Yeah, I have 2 Taks with that design. It works very well. The Cool Tube preamp is killer, too. I'll tell you, though...the first time I had a battery going dead, I thought I had a shielding problem or something..I started getting this loud hum and if I touched the EQ on the guitar it would go away. Finally, out of desperation, I replaced the battery...problem solved! Both of my Taks seem to be of very high quality, especially for the price.

"And so I definitely, when I have a daughter, I have a lot of good advice for her."

~Paris Hilton

 

BWAAAHAAAHAAHAAA!!!

 

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And, when do batteries die? During a lazy Sunday afternoon in your music room? No-OOO-ooo...they wait 'til the second set at that bar you've been trying for months to get a gig at.

 

EAT MY POST NOW, MOTHERFUCKER!!!

"Cisco Kid, was a friend of mine"
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Originally posted by Tedster:

And, when do batteries die? During a lazy Sunday afternoon in your music room? No-OOO-ooo...they wait 'til the second set at that bar you've been trying for months to get a gig at.

 

EAT MY POST NOW, MOTHERFUCKER!!!

:D:D Have we had our Metamucil today? :wave:
Never a DUH! moment! Well, almost never. OK, OK! Sometimes never!
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Originally posted by Tedster:

And, when do batteries die? During a lazy Sunday afternoon in your music room? No-OOO-ooo...they wait 'til the second set at that bar you've been trying for months to get a gig at.

 

EAT MY POST NOW, MOTHERFUCKER!!!

It's OK, Ted....we're all here for you.

 

 

By the way...you are absolutely right about the batteries. They NEVER pick a good time to die and the amount of warning they give you is inversely proportional to the importance of the importance of the battery and the level of difficulty and time required to change said battery. Meaning that if you have a battery where you have to remove all the strings on the guitar and unglue the top to change the battery and you are playing a solo in front of 30,000 people, you 9 microseconds of warning before losing all output. If you are just noodling around the house on a Takamine (it takes 4 seconds to change the battery), you get about 2 months notice.

"And so I definitely, when I have a daughter, I have a lot of good advice for her."

~Paris Hilton

 

BWAAAHAAAHAAHAAA!!!

 

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