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Blues


VuduChile_18

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Hey,

I got my first electric this christmas but have loved all blues and classic rock bands. Mainly the heavy blues guys. (SRV, Eric, Carlos,Jimi NOT jimmy page) I was just wonderin what i should listen to next. Maybe some of the older guys like Howlin' Wolf but I am afraid that they will cost too much and be hard to find.

I just want some more blues to listen to. ANy suggestions would help.

THANKS,

VUDU.

And if I were a guitar player

it would havta be the blues

 

-CCR- penthouse pauper

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Buy Muddy Waters' Hard Again (Blue Sky), you'll love it; basically a live-in-the-studio/no-overdubs affair, recorded with one big mic in mono! Sounds killer; Johnny Winter appears, and produced it, too.

 

Also buy WHOLE LOTTA BLUES: Songs of Led Zeppelin (This Ain't No Tribute!) (House of Blues), as stated it's a number of songs written by or assciated with Led Zeppelin, performed by various blues masters, old and young alike. Some great stuff!

 

Buy the Allman Bro's The Fillmore Concerts mini-box 2-CD w/ booklet package; seriously amazing interactive improv! Not only a classic, a benchmark and reference-example to live by to this day.

 

Now, check this out...

 

> FREE FREE FREE FREE FREE... !! <

 

Here's a thread with your needs written all over it:

 

http://www.musicplayer.com/ubb/icons/icon2.gif Diamond Dust\'s "~Top 20 Blues shows (all styles)~"-thread

 

(Click on it, it's a link; and in the initial post there, are another 20 links to live music downloads.)

 

Here's another one:

 

http://www.musicplayer.com/ubb/icons/icon2.gif Diamond Dust\'s "5 blues boots u have to have!!!"-thread

 

Lemmee know whatcha think...

Ask yourself- What Would Ren and Stimpy Do?

 

~ Caevan James-Michael Miller-O'Shite ~

_ ___ _ Leprechaun, Esquire _ ___ _

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Not trying to spark a LZ war or nothing its just that I can't stand Jimmy with Led Zeppelin. I think the music is good but LZ is well I'll just say very lyrically similar to others. I do like Jimmy in No intro neccessary and the yardbirds though.

 

Not trying to make any one mad because I know how many people like LZ

And if I were a guitar player

it would havta be the blues

 

-CCR- penthouse pauper

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Oh definitely get some authentic old timer stuff.

You'll never really know what the deal is if you on'y listen to interpreters, no matter how good they are.

Fred MacDowell*, one of the greatest slide players ever, is my personal favorite.

Muddy & the Wolf (one of the greatest singers ever!) you've heard of but also check Charlie Patton, Bukka White, Lightnin' Hopkins, Mississippi John Hurt for rural blues.

Tommy Johnson, Robert Johnson (non relatives) & Petey Wheatstrw for "bad men" blues.

There were 2 different Sonny Boy Williamsons playing harmonica, a generation apart & different styles but check them both. Also Little Walter Jacobs, the premier Chicago harpist & Sonny Terry a great county blues harpist.

Piano players like Otis Spann (Muddy Waters's band) & Pintop Perkins.

[You can learn a lot by imitating other instruments----tha's how Chuck Berry got his rock-boogie thing, from imitating a pianist Johnny Johnson.]

Back to guitar, Lemon Jefferson for proto-Chicago style; Jimmy Reed for later, smooth city style.

Blind Willie McTell for some stunning picking.

Elmore James for one of the immediate predecessors of rock'n'roll (you've got to hear some of these guys just to know who Clapton & all are stealing their licks from).

One neglected modern king is Johnny Winter, all his records have something good on them good, even the rock ones. There's also Michael Bloomfield, dead & often forgotten but one of the hottest, most influential blues-rock players you'll ever hear.

 

Two of the most chilling singers you'll ever hear, even more than the highly touted Robert Johnson, are Skip James & Son House. Wolf was the greatest blues singer but he never really scares you. These guys make you afraid to walk alone at night.

 

There are some other modern guys I'd recommend: Taj Mahal is never less than terrific but if you can find his first 2 records, Taj Mahal & Giant Step/The Old Folks you'll be amazed. Similar is Keb Mo'. Both those cats update the blues without losing its roots.

 

& just to prove that there was something going on before Bonnie Raitt & Susan tedeschi, check out Memphis Minnie (she wrote one of Led Zepellin's biggest hits, "When The Levee Breaks" plus played guitar, & a whole slew of singers from the 1920s: Bessie Smith, Mamie Smith, Ida Cox...

 

Thes people aren't really hard to find or any more expensive to collect than their modern imitators. Besides reissues of their catalogs, there are lots of collections that feature several of them in one shot. Heck, you can probably find 'em on line for downloads, if you look.

The value of learning the "rill dill" instead of the 3rd or 4th generation imitations will be worth the effort & will show itself in your playing.

If you were interested in the Beatles or the Rolling Stones would you study Oasis & Bon Jovi?

 

If you really want to get an overview, check out some books that can give you descriptions of how the music developed & what different people contributed, as well as some idea what they sound like, although nothing prepares you for what having the music in your ear.

 

 

[*BTW, most people will spell that Fred McDowell, but that's never how he pronounced it.]

 

 

;)

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In my opinion, if you want to play the blues, then listen to the true masters:

 

B.B. King: Live at the Regal

Buddy Guy: the Best of

Muddy Waters: the Essential Collection

Magic Sam: West Side Soul

 

That B.B. King record is an absolute clinic on how to play the blues. Get that record and start transcribing solos. That's all you really need.

 

Just my opinion.

 

Good luck!

 

Martin

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There was a great, multi-part series on PBS about the Blues a few years ago.

 

http://www.pbs.org/theblues/

 

While the video may not be available online, there was a companion radio broadcast that is...

 

http://www.yearoftheblues.org/radio/index.asp

 

Listen and learn a little music history!

"Spend all day doing nothing

But we sure do it well" - Huck Johns from 'Oh Yeah'

Click to Listen to Oh yeah

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Originally posted by VuduChile_18:

I just want some more blues to listen to. ANy suggestions would help.

I'd look in the bargain bins in supermarkets and malls and places like that. Sometimes you can get these monster size compilation CDs for only a few bucks.

 

ADDED: remember all the musicians that have been mentioned in this thread and you can't go wrong. And when you get an album, look at the personnel listings and join up the dots.

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If you listen to BB King, Muddy Waters and Elmore James you will have the basic elements to understand where people like Eric Clapton started to build their blues idioma: kind of learning a new language starting with the alphabet. :)

My favorite Clapton album (as far as blues goes) is "EC was here" (live); I think that at the time he was still using his 335, which to me is a much better guitar to play the blues, compared with the Stratocaster he is using on more recent albums.

Speaking of the Strato vs. Gibson comparison, does anyone else feels the same, i.e. that the Strato has too much attack and too little sustain to play the blues? :confused:

Yes, I know of Jimi and SRV, but still think that a good electric blues needs a mellow sound, that a Strato simply cannot deliver.

Korg PA3X Pro 76 and Kronos 61, Roland G-70, Integra 7 and BK7-m, Casio PX-5S, Fender Stratocaster with Fralin pickups, Fender Stratocaster with Kinman pickups, 1965 Gibson SG Standard
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I can't criticise the names given above - they're all marvellous and I have something of them all.

 

BUT

 

Bo Diddley has been a hero of mine since I first heard him in the *very* early 60s. He brings a different ear and different rhythm to the blues - he himself called it 'Jungle Music'.

 

Two of my more modern(? - perhaps not as modern as I sometimes think) favourites are T-Bone Walker and Gary BB Coleman.

 

T-Bone has been around longer than people think and has been pretty seminal in the production of the more funky/jazzy blues sound.

 

Gary BB Coleman is a wonderful blend of smooth influences combined with BB King-style guitar playing.

 

My fav is still Jimmy Reed, though :0)

 

Geoff

"When the power of love overcomes the love of power the World will know Peace": Jimi Hendrix

http://www.soundclick.com/bands/default.cfm?bandID=738517&content=music

The Geoff - blame Caevan!!!

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If you add Howlin' Wolf's "Moanin' at Midnight/Rocking Chair" CD to mtlin's list, that would be a good starting point. After that, explore the other great suggestions posted here (particularly Freddie and Albert King, Little Walter, and Otis Rush). As far as current acts go, I really like Little Charlie and the Nightcats, The Paladins, Joe Louis Walker, and the Queen of the Blues, Koko Taylor, to name a few.
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Originally posted by Dreamer:

If you listen to BB King, Muddy Waters and Elmore James you will have the basic elements to understand where people like Eric Clapton started to build their blues idioma: kind of learning a new language starting with the alphabet. :)

My favorite Clapton album (as far as blues goes) is "EC was here" (live); I think that at the time he was still using his 335, which to me is a much better guitar to play the blues, compared with the Stratocaster he is using on more recent albums.

Speaking of the Strato vs. Gibson comparison, does anyone else feels the same, i.e. that the Strato has too much attack and too little sustain to play the blues? :confused:

Yes, I know of Jimi and SRV, but still think that a good electric blues needs a mellow sound, that a Strato simply cannot deliver.

"EC Was Here" is a great album!

 

I understand why you feel as you do about Gibsons vs. Strats for blues. I like 'em both; Buddy Guy, Otis Rush, Johnny 'Guitar' Watson, and many other blues players have used Strats to good effect. Depends what you want, I think. I like that icepick-in-the-ear Strat tone, and if you wind it up enough, it will sustain. :D

 

To each his or her own. ;)

 

 

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Get some Albert King, Blues At Sunrise is pretty good. If you're gonna get some BB King, get Live At The Regal. Freddie King's stuff is kind of uneven in terms of quality, or at least it is for my taste. Get some of his early stuff. It's all out there, usually for pretty cheap.

Always remember that you�re unique. Just like everyone else.

 

 

 

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You know? I need to check out some of the old blues a little bit too. I have to admit, most of what I know on the blues is kind of 2nd generation stuff... Clapton, Trower, etc.

 

A great place to go to check out old recordings is the good ol' public library (or my old college library). I think I'll make a trip soon.

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quote:

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Originally posted by comacoda:

 

My favorite Clapton album (as far as blues goes) is "EC was here" (live); I think that at the time he was still using his 335, which to me is a much better guitar to play the blues, compared with the Stratocaster he is using on more recent albums.

Speaking of the Strato vs. Gibson comparison, does anyone else feels the same, i.e. that the Strato has too much attack and too little sustain to play the blues?

Yes, I know of Jimi and SRV, but still think that a good electric blues needs a mellow sound, that a Strato simply cannot deliver. --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Originally posted by Chad:

I understand why you feel as you do about Gibsons vs. Strats for blues. I like 'em both; Buddy Guy, Otis Rush, Johnny 'Guitar' Watson, and many other blues players have used Strats to good effect. Depends what you want, I think.--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 

I agree with Chad. I've often found EC's blues playing a little clinical, while most of my favorite blues artists often have a really sharp attack or "harsh" tones from using equipment that many would label as crap guitars and amps. However, the feel on records by Howlin' Wolf, Hound Dog Taylor, Albert Collins, and many others can't be matched. Most Chess classics have more of a slightly primitive, rootsy sound than a polished one. While most of my favorites (like Hubert Sumlin, Little Charlie Baty, and Dave Gonzales) play both single coils and humbuckers, and I love B.B. King's style and approach, to my ear, a smooth mellow sound usually belongs more in jazz than blues.

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I think the choice of guitar is more personally arrived at by what you grew with as a player. My first real guitar is a Tele, and I learned the vast majority of Hendrixisms on it as a teen. I still have that guitar, and still break it out once in a while, but Strat types have become my main focus. I'll play the blues with whatever is in my hands, be it my V, 355s, 175, Blades, etc., and not feel limited or encumbered. If I wanna play a BB song, and approximate his tone, then a Gibson is the most logical choice. But Roy Buchanan just wouldn't sound right on anything but a Tele, in my mind, nor would Albert Collins.
Never a DUH! moment! Well, almost never. OK, OK! Sometimes never!
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Originally posted by chad:

I understand why you feel as you do about Gibsons vs. Strats for blues. I like 'em both; Buddy Guy, Otis Rush, Johnny 'Guitar' Watson, and many other blues players have used Strats to good effect. Depends what you want, I think. I like that icepick-in-the-ear Strat tone, and if you wind it up enough, it will sustain. :D

 

To each his or her own. ;) [/QB]

Yes, I definitely agree with you here; however, my choice of Clapton and of his "EC was here" album was not casual: just listen to the first song on the CD ("Have you ever loved a woman") and then listen to the same song recorded live in his double CD "Blues", where he is using his "Blackie" Stratocaster: the guitar player is the same, the song is the same, yet the result is completely different, due to the guitar used: to compensate for the (relative) lack of sustain of the Stratocaster, Clapton has to play more notes and use more legato, but he never reaches the climax you can here on "EC was here" and he doesn't even venture in a solo, maybe because he does not feel inspired enough (just listen to the solo in "EC was here" and you can easily say how much more inspired he was). :cool:

So my point is: the differences existing between two guitars like a 335 and a Stratocaster modify heavily your technical approach and also the way you play the same song (and in this case is obvious which version is my favorite).

 

Originally posted by ihategarybettman:

To my ear, a smooth mellow sound usually belongs more in jazz than blues. [/QB]

Maybe I should have clarified better what I mean with "mellow" in a rock/blues contest: to me mellow is Carlos Santana playing his PRS, or Jimmy Page playing his Les Paul Standard... or Eric Clapton playing his 335. :cool:

So I guess that my definition of a "mellow" (yet distorted) sound is a sound with not too much attack, but with a lot of sustain and with the kind of non-metallic, sweet distortion that most resembles the sound of a violin. :freak:

Korg PA3X Pro 76 and Kronos 61, Roland G-70, Integra 7 and BK7-m, Casio PX-5S, Fender Stratocaster with Fralin pickups, Fender Stratocaster with Kinman pickups, 1965 Gibson SG Standard
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