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Your Most disappointing experience in Music


Dr. Ellwood

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I think we have all had some experiences with music related events that somehow didn't measure up to our preconceived ideas of what they would be like. What where the things or events that you looked forward too that fell far short of your expectations? This could be for instance a long awaited concert, a particular artist, a renowned PA system falling short of how you imagined it to be, a long waited and saved for guitar or amp, a gig that went completely bad for no reason when you thought you where totally prepared, or any other music related less than spectacular disappointments.
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One bad experience was seeing The Pogues live. The venue just felt too big and they were like this tiny little band huddled away in a corner. The lightshow, which consisted of orange, white and green light was the most hideous I've ever seen. People looked either garish (white), as if they had a fake suntan (orange) or like rotting corpses (green). Yuk. I will never get that evening back, and it's a shame 'cause if there's one band I love, it's The Pogues.

 

The second worst experience was the first gig of the last band I was in (got that?)

 

I was left at the bar to mind the gear and I decided to have a gin and tonic to relax me and pass the time. But I forgot that I'm a very fast drinker, and I go through a G&T in a couple of minutes. So by the time the rest of the band came back from dinner I was completely shitfaced and in no state to play. We struggled through the gig but it was a total and absolute disaster.

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The best that I can come up with is that I'm disappointed in myself for indulging in booze more than my music. I pissed away lots of good opportunities musically and otherwise.

 

I'm not bitter. I grew up enough just in time, salvaged my life and can honestly say that I'm happy.

 

I know you didn't ask for anything "spectacular" Lee but this was the best I could come up with.

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Discovering that the great majority of people who call themselves musicians, cannot read music, do not understand more than the most rudimentary music theory, lack breadth in their notion of what types of music are out there, are disinterested in exploring those other types of music with which they are not familiar. Most importantly, what I find disturbing is that many people who call themselves musicians make little or no effort to combat their ignorance. I am in no way saying that some of these people can not play, nor am I saying that some of them can not perform satisfactorily. I simply find them tremendously disappointing and by and large uninteresting.

 

This criticism doesn't have to do with ignorance, it has to do with a lack of desire to learn. I think voluntarily choosing to be ignorant, much less revelling in it, is disgusting.

 

If you feel like you're being harshly judged here, do something about it, or not. Either make an effort to broaden your horizons and your knowledge, or make an ad hominem attack against me. Personally I think the former action will be more productive, but the choice is yours.

 

Cheers,

 

Alan Tomlinson

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Two actually...both recent.

 

1) After working with this band for over a year and a half, we played so far one gig...a closed party (so wife and friends didn't get to even hear me yet), and it was horrible. Rain, too shallow a stage, no covering (til later, when it stopped raining) and we ended up waiting over 6 hours to go on, never got a sound check, and the monitors were intermittent.

 

2) Just now, finally started actively looking for gigs...got one for a weekend in a pub in Oslo, been working hard and letting everyone I know know about it, now less than two weeks before the gig, our drummer has a problem with his arm and his doctor forbids him from playing for a month. Too short notice (and too many unique arrangements...plus I don't want the first time my friends all hear it to be sub-par) for a stand-in drummer.

 

 

Oh yeah..one last one. I've been in working bands before, but after a LONG (years) hiatus, and moving to a new country (Norway) I just assumed I could find like minded, and similar level of musician as myself. Really dissapointing that it is just SO difficult to find 40+ year olds, that can play, and are dedicated all....

 

Beginning to wonder when things will start. If the drummer gets this chronically...well the singer is old too, and who knows how long it can go before medical situations take over?

====================================================

Check out my original music at

http://www.soundclick.com/bands/jacker

 

"In theory there is no difference between theory and practice,

but not in practice."

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Originally posted by FormerOceanwaySlave:

Discovering that the great majority of people who call themselves musicians, cannot read music, do not understand more than the most rudimentary music theory, lack breadth in their notion of what types of music are out there, are disinterested in exploring those other types of music with which they are not familiar. Most importantly, what I find disturbing is that many people who call themselves musicians make little or no effort to combat their ignorance. I am in no way saying that some of these people can not play, nor am I saying that some of them can not perform satisfactorily. I simply find them tremendously disappointing and by and large uninteresting.

 

This criticism doesn't have to do with ignorance, it has to do with a lack of desire to learn. I think voluntarily choosing to be ignorant, much less revelling in it, is disgusting.

 

If you feel like you're being harshly judged here, do something about it, or not. Either make an effort to broaden your horizons and your knowledge, or make an ad hominem attack against me. Personally I think the former action will be more productive, but the choice is yours.

 

Cheers,

 

Alan Tomlinson

The problem here is really probably a simple one. It would probably be easy to solve, if I were interested in learning anything. You see, the problem is....I don't know what ad hominem attack means. I know what ad nauseum means, but I don't think you really want me to puke on you. I know what ad hoc means, but I don't think you want me to hock on you either. Does ad hominem mean to throw hominy at you? :D Just kidding...it's the ad delirium that makes me do it.

 

I agree with you to a point. I know how to read music and I studied theory. Actually, it's a never-ending quest....there is always something else to learn it seems. I can perform Sor and JS Bach and Tarrega and pieces from other composers..up to about RCM 7 or 8.

 

However, I don't think it's for everybody. It is a lot of work (a helluva lot)....it's hours practicing one technique over and over (ad nauseum :D ), hours on end playing one piece (or sometimes just one measure) over and over. It's many many hours trying to perfect the emotion or dynamics of a piece or trying to get the perfect tone for a piece. It's many hours practicing repertoire pieces, then trying to learn a new piece to add to the repertoire. Then you can reward yourself a little by playing some blues on your electric or some modern acoustic song on your steel string. It's a lot of structure and discipline and for some people that takes the fun out of it. For some people, playing is a way to ESCAPE all that and just freewheel for a while. I don't think anyone should be condemened because they choose to just play. They may be limiting themselves, DEPENDING upon what they want to do with their music. If they just want to play as a way to relax and have a good time at parties, picnics, family gatherings or just sitting around the house, then they probably aren't hurting themselves in the least by not learning theory and how to read music. Anybody can read TAB...and there's plenty of it available now. On the other hand, if they aspire to be a professional musician, then they are certainly limiting themselves if they don't learn theory and sight reading for their instrument.

 

You and I find theory interesting..not everyone does. Some people find it boring, but they love to play. That's OK.

"And so I definitely, when I have a daughter, I have a lot of good advice for her."

~Paris Hilton

 

BWAAAHAAAHAAHAAA!!!

 

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My greatest disappointment was playing in a church situation where a bunch of talented people came in: a lady who is a fine pianist and singer and choir director, a fine sax/flute who also plays guitar and bass and writes out charts easier than I write letters, a guy who sings great country gospel (including harmonies) and plays good "rhythm piano" to coin a phrase, another young lady who sings beautifully and could be a very good piano with a little instruction in music theory (as in, you play it beautifully in D, learn to play it in Eb and E, cause it DOES modulate, after all...).. all wonderful people..

 

Somehow it all fell apart, and rather acriminiously.. none of us came out of it smelling like angels.. and none of us came into it with any evil intentions... I'm still scratching my head wondering, "What went wrong?" We could have written and recorded some beautiful tunes.. in addition to doing a fine job at services!

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I think my most disappointing musical experience was going to see Three Dog Night live. The sound was way way way too bright. They played terribly (some songs were nearly unrecognizable). The people in the seats in front of us stood up about half the time. So we had to stand up. And I got a parking ticket (in a parking lot?). Overall the experience was an F-.

Born on the Bayou

 

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Originally posted by FormerOceanwaySlave:

Discovering that the great majority of people who call themselves musicians, cannot read music, do not understand more than the most rudimentary music theory, lack breadth in their notion of what types of music are out there, are disinterested in exploring those other types of music with which they are not familiar. Most importantly, what I find disturbing is that many people who call themselves musicians make little or no effort to combat their ignorance. I am in no way saying that some of these people can not play, nor am I saying that some of them can not perform satisfactorily. I simply find them tremendously disappointing and by and large uninteresting.

 

This criticism doesn't have to do with ignorance, it has to do with a lack of desire to learn. I think voluntarily choosing to be ignorant, much less revelling in it, is disgusting.

 

If you feel like you're being harshly judged here, do something about it, or not. Either make an effort to broaden your horizons and your knowledge, or make an ad hominem attack against me. Personally I think the former action will be more productive, but the choice is yours.

 

Cheers,

 

Alan Tomlinson

Yeh people disgust me too...how dare they pretend

to be musicians...off with their heads :bor:

The story of life is quicker then the blink of an eye, the story of love is hello, goodbye.
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Originally posted by LPCustom:

I think my most disappointing musical experience was going to see Three Dog Night live. The sound was way way way too bright. They played terribly (some songs were nearly unrecognizable). The people in the seats in front of us stood up about half the time. So we had to stand up. And I got a parking ticket (in a parking lot?). Overall the experience was an F-.

This wasn't in St. Charles, IL in 1991 or so, was it? My old band opened for them & somehow our bass player seriously buggered up the PA. They weren't too happy about that. We had fun, though :)

It's not simple to be simple.

-H. Matisse

 

Ross Precision Guitars

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Well, the death of John Lennon hit me too...but I wouldn't classify that as a "disappointing experience in music". That was a tragedy of epic proportions. I think what Ellwood was talking about was like getting booked for a gig at "Bambi's home for naked cheerleaders" and getting there and finding all the hottest naked cheerleaders, from the class of '41. :eek:

 

To that end, I'll say I've had DOZENS of disappointing experiences, usually in the form of a looked-forward-to gig being sucky for some reason or another, either the crowd's dead, or it's an outdoor gig in the middle of a thunderstorm, or something.

"Cisco Kid, was a friend of mine"
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1) Getting bagged from the band i was in that had the best chance of "making it big," (IE. maybe actually putting out an independent record and doing a little regional touring). They broke up about three months later. The leder acknowledged getting rid of me was a huge mistake and I ended up backing him up on another project years later.

 

2) Meeting Clem Burke (one of my all-time favorite drummers) and discovering he was pretty much a stereotypical arrogant dope-smoking-moron drummer. I probably should have figured that one out in advance. :rolleyes::D

Mudcat's music on Soundclick

 

"Work hard. Rock hard. Eat hard. Sleep hard. Grow big. Wear glasses if you need 'em."-The Webb Wilder Credo-

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