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Gibson TV commercial


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There is only 2 ways to increase sales of a product: get your current customers to buy more, or find new customers. Since their brand is already saturated with the music enthusiast market, Gibson is reaching out to other markets.

 

From time to time, they have been running ads in magazines like Esquire, too. Gibson is likely to be targeting Men 35-54 years old, going after the affluent "leasure activity" guitar player. They want to tap into a market that might look to buy a nice expensive Les Paul they way they might consider buying a Harley or a fine watch.

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Originally posted by TimEm:

I guess I've gotta make some children, so I can get some more guitars, too...
I have a six month old daughter... I've already started making flash cards :thu:
Just wait... :D

 

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"Cisco Kid, was a friend of mine"
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I saw the Gibson ad on the local 11 PM news (I don't know if it was the local affiliate's spot or inserted by Comcrap). Very good TV, very well produced.

 

It seemed to be a brand-building ad, rather than a call-to-action for a specific product. With Gibson in Best Buy, etc., Henry J. has a good reason to go broad and try to establish Gibson as *the* guitar name.

 

It seems like I see as many Jaguar ads as Toyota ads on TV, but we all know Ford does not sell as many Jags as Toyota sells Camrys, by a long shot. I think that, at least with established users, some of this marketing money might be better spent on final fit 'n finish and QC at the factory, though.

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Originally posted by doug osborne:

It seems like I see as many Jaguar ads as Toyota ads on TV, but we all know Ford does not sell as many Jags as Toyota sells Camrys, by a long shot. I think that, at least with established users, some of this marketing money might be better spent on final fit 'n finish and QC at the factory, though.

Tell me about it, we sometimes get Boeing ads. Now, what the hell is the point of a Boeing ad? It's not like you're going to drop everything and go buy yourself a 747 on the strength of a TV commercial.

 

Even if you're in a position to buy one, you'll probably have to call 39,278,340 meetings before signing on the dotted line and taking the keys.

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Originally posted by Kramer Ferrington III.:

Originally posted by doug osborne:

It seems like I see as many Jaguar ads as Toyota ads on TV, but we all know Ford does not sell as many Jags as Toyota sells Camrys, by a long shot. I think that, at least with established users, some of this marketing money might be better spent on final fit 'n finish and QC at the factory, though.

Tell me about it, we sometimes get Boeing ads. Now, what the hell is the point of a Boeing ad? It's not like you're going to drop everything and go buy yourself a 747 on the strength of a TV commercial.

 

Even if you're in a position to buy one, you'll probably have to call 39,278,340 meetings before signing on the dotted line and taking the keys.

The assumption with these kinds of ads are that the manufacturer shows a "factory" non-carrier branded aircraft. It is an attempt to separate the manufacturer from the carrier that buys the aircraft. One provides a professionally engineered aircraft and the other, the carrier provides the service/or not ...the maintenance/or not... customer interface/or NOT.. it is a distancing from the carrier, not to be confused with the aircraft builder.
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It's more than that, Lee and Vince.

 

Boeing is in a defensive posture these days, what with the Airbus A380 coming online as the biggest, baddest aircraft in the air travel industry. They want people who care to frequent trips advertised on their planes, to keep the orders rolling in.

 

I think they're off base. Most people I know see what aircraft they're on after the fact, if not when they receive their boarding pass. I think it's naive to believe that many people care one way or another about which widebody jet they're on. So long as it is a wide body jet. And as for keeping people in 747's over the A380? It just ain't gonna happen.

It's easiest to find me on Facebook. Neil Bergman

 

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Those Boeing ads are to attract stock investors, not to try to sell aircraft. Boeings spends a LOT of money courting potential buyers of their aircraft (including the Pentagon). Far more money than they spend on TV commercals.

 

These ad buys on television are for company PR to encourage investment in Boeing stock. It's the same reason your local power company (which has a monopoly in your area) is allowed to advertise. To drum up investor interest and hopefully stock purchases. They usually even list the programs they buy ads in on their annual reports as being a sponsor of those programs. It's pure PR.

 

Boeing _knows_ it isn't going to sell $50 million aircraft to individuals with those ads. But GM, Gibson, Fender and a host of other companies that sell consumer goods are marketing those goods directly to the consumer.

 

Boeing is marketing their corporation to consumers for the only thing that most consumers can buy and that's their common stock.

Born on the Bayou

 

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Originally posted by fantasticsound:

Boeing is in a defensive posture these days, what with the Airbus A380 coming online as the biggest, baddest aircraft in the air travel industry.

I won't go into the current argument between Boeing and Airbus. But I will say this. The rollout of the A380 has been and is, I think, going to be somewhat slow for some time. The problem is that the aircraft is so heavy (when loaded) that many airports' runways cannot handle the load.

 

Some airports that can handle the 747 can also handle the A380 but not most of them and even some of those only on certain runways. Given the age of the 747 design versus the new A380 design, buying the aircraft to replace 747s isn't that hard a decision for most airlines except for the problem of being able to operate it at relatively few airports fully laden. A problem it shares with the C5-Galaxy and the Antonov An-225.

 

This is similar to the problem that Boeing first encountered when they rolled out the 747. Most airports didn't have runways long enough to accomodate the 747 and most still don't. But all of the major (read international) airports can handle it. A fully laden 747 needed nearly 1200 feet more runway than the DC-8 did, IIRC.

 

IIRC, there are about two dozen airports world wide that can handle the A380 right now and only a few of those can handle a fully laden one. Supposedly Airbus is working with major airports and the airlines to get them to upgrade their runways (or build stronger new ones). At some airports, apparently even the wingspan is a problem.

 

Another aspect that isn't talked about much is that the more passengers an aircraft can carry, the more enticing a target it is for terrorists to try to bring one down.

Born on the Bayou

 

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I hadn't thought about the investors. That's one mystery solved.

 

That must be the answer, I've never seen anyone turn back from a check in saying "You expect me to fly on a ? Forget it!" so there's no sense pitching ads at the passengers.

 

Ok, thanks for that. :thu::)

 

 

Not sure about that terrorist angle, we haven't given up on our various landmarks and tourist spots just because a lot of people congregate there, why should we give up on bigger airplanes?

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Originally posted by Kramer Ferrington III.:

I hadn't thought about the investors. That's one mystery solved.

 

That must be the answer, I've never seen anyone turn back from a check in saying "You expect me to fly on a ? Forget it!" so there's no sense pitching ads at the passengers.

 

Ok, thanks for that. :thu::)

 

 

Not sure about that terrorist angle, we haven't given up on our various landmarks and tourist spots just because a lot of people congregate there, why should we give up on bigger airplanes?

I wasn't suggesting that anyone give up on larger and/or more efficient aircraft. It's just that airplanes are already a terrorist target and the bigger they are and the more passengers they carry the more inticing they will be as targets.

 

Just an observation about that and the fact that it isn't discussed at all by the news media even though it's probably something that the airlines and Airbus are acutely aware of.

Born on the Bayou

 

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Originally posted by LPCustom:

Just an observation about that and the fact that it isn't discussed at all by the news media even though it's probably something that the airlines and Airbus are acutely aware of.

Business is so incestuous these days, I wonder how many networks are tied to the aviation business (as in airlines and construction houses).
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Originally posted by d:

Is that an ad for Gibson or an ad using a Gibson?

Isn't it actually for a car or something & just using the guitar as an analogy for dependable products?

Definitely a Gibson ad, not the other ad which starts out by saying "This is the sound of a '57 Gibson Les Paul played through a Fender Twin..." or something like that. I think this is a car ad.
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Originally posted by skipclone 1:

I don`t even think one has a choice of which airplane goes where you`re going-it`s about which carrier has seats on the day you want.

Not true, Skip. Many airline ticket sales sites list the type of airplane for a specific flight. If you don't like the plane you can look for a different flight or, more likely, a flight with another carrier.

 

I made this comparson on a fictitious flight plan search at Expedia between LAX and ORD (Chicago, O'Hare airport). After the search finds flights, on major carriers you can hit a seating preview which brings up a seating chart as seen below. The name and seating configuration of the type of aircraft is listed in the lower right of each screen capture.

 

http://img227.imageshack.us/img227/9493/7572002zk.jpg

 

http://img522.imageshack.us/img522/8392/7673007ys.jpg

 

http://img522.imageshack.us/img522/7681/airbusa3209lh.jpg

 

And these are three flights from the same carrier. While it's true that smaller markets have less choice, there may be different planes depending on what flight you choose, even within a single carrier.

It's easiest to find me on Facebook. Neil Bergman

 

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Originally posted by fantasticsound:

Originally posted by skipclone 1:

I don`t even think one has a choice of which airplane goes where you`re going-it`s about which carrier has seats on the day you want.

Not true, Skip. Many airline ticket sales sites list the type of airplane for a specific flight. If you don't like the plane you can look for a different flight or, more likely, a flight with another carrier.

 

I made this comparson on a fictitious flight plan search at Expedia between LAX and ORD (Chicago, O'Hare airport). After the search finds flights, on major carriers you can hit a seating preview which brings up a seating chart as seen below. The name and seating configuration of the type of aircraft is listed in the lower right of each screen capture.

 

http://img227.imageshack.us/img227/9493/7572002zk.jpg

 

http://img522.imageshack.us/img522/8392/7673007ys.jpg

 

http://img522.imageshack.us/img522/7681/airbusa3209lh.jpg

 

And these are three flights from the same carrier. While it's true that smaller markets have less choice, there may be different planes depending on what flight you choose, even within a single carrier.

I`ve used that system myself. I think I didn`t state my point well. I didn`t mean NO choice but that in the busier hub markets, the first priority as you said, would be getting where you`re going, the seat you`d like etc.-not which airplane you`re on. Unless a craft gets a bad rep for safety, like the DC-10 or something, most folks won`t pay attention.

Same old surprises, brand new cliches-

 

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www.soundclick.com/bands/pagemusic.cfm?bandid=602491

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