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ajstan Offline OP
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Has anyone here had the chance to play the new Yamaha PSR E373? If so, what are your opinions vs. the Casio CT-X700? I was all set to get a CT-X700 as a couch practice board, but would consider the new E373 if it had clearly better sounds and a better keybed. I've watched the multiple Jeremy See videos but that's just one person's opinion. I haven't seen the E373 mentioned in any of the threads about portable practice boards, including the Casiotones and the GoKeys/GoPiano.

EDIT: I have read the "Couch Keyboard" thread and the comments there along with separate threads for the CT-X700, the new Casiotones and the GoPiano/GoKeys.

Here's what I'm looking for and what I understand to be the main similarities and differences:

- Purpose: $200 budget. Couch practice and deck/patio use with the internal speakers. Primarily want to call up an AP/EP for general use or a split to practice playing two different parts simultaneously.

- General Similarities: Polyphony, built-in sounds, speaker size and wattage, runs off 6AA batteries.

- CT-X700 Advantages: Slightly more compact. $41 less expensive ($199 Yamaha + $14.99 A/C adapter vs. $174 Casio). Easier sound selection, 32 registration slots vs. 9, better display.

- PSR-E373 Advantages: Sends audio via USB, DSP, Super Articulation Lite Voices, can set volume for split/layer sounds (Casio doesn't).

- Can't tell yet from the available videos: Better sounds, better keybed.

- Don't Care About: Rhythms, Recorder.


Here's a link to the E373 product page:
https://usa.yamaha.com/products/musical_instruments/keyboards/portable_keyboards/psr-e373/index.html

Thanks!

Last edited by ajstan; 12/05/20 02:13 PM. Reason: Clarification and added budget.

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I wouldnt get either one without a pitchwheel. You can't really have fun on a sax patch or synth patch without it.
Other than that, if all things are close to equal, volume on your splits is essential.

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You will not see much about beginner boards here, with the nearest being low end digital pianos like the Casio S1000 or Yamaha P 125, Kawai ES 110 etc.

Play a Go Keys or Go Piano and you will soon see why they are not written about much.

As for your choices, quite honestly up your budget and buy something much superior like a Korg EK50 which is $450 USD.

Or go for the Yamaha 463 which is $300 or Casio CTX3000 also at $300


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@Jr. Deluxe - thanks for the reply. A pitch wheel would be nice, but the AiX sound engine and speakers of the CT-X700 seem to be so much better than what's in the less-expensive Casiotone CT-S300 that has a pitch wheel. I think the lack of split volume may be irritating on occasion, but not sure that the extra $ is worth it if the Yamaha overall sounds aren't that much better. That's why I'm trying to get additional opinions on the sounds of the E373, which is purported to offer a significantly advanced sound engine and piano sample than its predecessor, the E363, which did not fare well against the CT-X700.

@Biggles - thanks for the reply. I corrected my initial post so it now reads more clearly and I also added a budget of $200. My idea to get a "couch keyboard" came from recent threads on this site as well as older threads regarding the CT-X700.

I believe that both the CT-X700 and the PSR E373 have the same sound engine, pianos, and keybed as their respective companies' $450 boards, so I don't think either of them will sacrifice sound/playability vs. spending double the price. Also, bigger speakers mean a bigger chassis and more weight, which defeats the purpose of getting a lap board.


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Originally Posted by ajstan
@Jr. Deluxe - thanks for the reply. A pitch wheel would be nice, but the AiX sound engine and speakers of the CT-X700 seem to be so much better than what's in the less-expensive Casiotone CT-S300 that has a pitch wheel. I think the lack of split volume may be irritating on occasion, but not sure that the extra $ is worth it if the Yamaha overall sounds aren't that much better. That's why I'm trying to get additional opinions on the sounds of the E373, which is purported to offer a significantly advanced sound engine and piano sample than its predecessor, the E363, which did not fare well against the CT-X700.

@Biggles - thanks for the reply. I corrected my initial post so it now reads more clearly and I also added a budget of $200. My idea to get a "couch keyboard" came from recent threads on this site as well as older threads regarding the CT-X700.

I believe that both the CT-X700 and the PSR E373 have the same sound engine, pianos, and keybed as their respective companies' $450 boards, so I don't think either of them will sacrifice sound/playability vs. spending double the price. Also, bigger speakers mean a bigger chassis and more weight, which defeats the purpose of getting a lap board.

I get the budget.

Take it from one who has played the E series models the 463 is worth the extra $ over the 373.

It is the same with the Casio models, the 700 is the bottom tier of the ladder.

If you buy the 373 and practice daily then in six months you will have well outgrown the capabilities of the keyboard.

Buy once buy better quality.


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I thought about a lap keyboard for sitting in front of the tv. But the board slipped around on my legs too much and in the end I didnt find it useful practice. So I put a keyboard stand by the tv and practice that way. It is way better, at least for me.

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ajstan Offline OP
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Originally Posted by Biggles
I get the budget.

Take it from one who has played the E series models the 463 is worth the extra $ over the 373.

It is the same with the Casio models, the 700 is the bottom tier of the ladder.

If you buy the 373 and practice daily then in six months you will have well outgrown the capabilities of the keyboard.

Buy once buy better quality.
Again, thanks for the comments. Not arguing the “buy once buy better quality” mantra (take a look at my signature). I focus on the features I will most likely use and the user experience. I don’t see any quality differences between the 463 and 373 (or between the x700, x3000, and x5000). Same sound engine, main piano, and keybed. Yes the 463 has more sounds and features, but it’s almost 16 inches deep and weighs almost 15 pounds, both prohibitive for a lap keyboard.

This did help, though. I think I’m going to go with the x700. I’m not sure any incremental cost is going to give me commensurate value for how I plan to use it.


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Hi there! I'm agonizing between these 2 models myself, so I'm curious about whether you got the Casio yet or not and if so how is it working out? My needs are similar, with a couple tweaks: I have a P125 digital piano I use 90% of the time, and am also looking for the "couch" keyboard, but with some additional needs:

- ability to create (and export as audio) my own very simple, but accurate to the song backing tracks (that I can then assemble into a set list for playing along with on the P125)
- as a non MIDI/DAW source of additional sounds to add to the recordings I make with the P-125
- portable option for jam sessions, possible busking

Casio advantages for my needs:
- dedicated fill buttons etc for creating backing tracks, + 6 track recorder vs. only 2 on the Yamaha
- 32 registrations (useful for jam sessions + busking) vs. only 9 on the Yamaha
- velocity sensitive sound articulation (on guitars, basses, horns etc) vs. holding down a button on the Yamaha ugh

Yamaha advantages for my needs:
- BIG one: audio interface included in the USB->Device port (I have this on my P-125 and the audio recordings are stellar quality compared to what I get out of any external audio interface box that I've tried; and since I'm planning on making recordings with whatever I get for use with my P125 this is a huge feature)
- spectacular piano sample (they improved this drastically from the E363; the piano sample on the E373 blows the E463 out of the water there's no comparison)
- 30+ DSP effects
- "Super articulation lite" sounds; very cool for use in a recording (you have to hold down a button), the Casio velocity sensitive version is better

Basically the Casio would be the better choice for jamming/busking and the Yamaha for recording so I'm leaning Yamaha.

Curious how your choice has worked out

Last edited by Piano Tone; 03/30/21 07:38 PM.
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I also started looking at super cheepos. In my case as a total junker for parties and jams where I can let literally anybody sit in on a song and pound away on my board without a care. But as I said above, for me a pitchwheel is a must have. To misquote tina, no wheel no deal. So at under $150 the casio ct s300 looks interesting.

The string and brass isn't awful but every piano and ep sounds very tinky and the organs dont sound like I'm gonna get me some lovin everry day. So I haven't jumped on it yet.

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Originally Posted by Piano Tone
Hi there! I'm agonizing between these 2 models myself, so I'm curious about whether you got the Casio yet or not and if so how is it working out? My needs are similar, with a couple tweaks: I have a P125 digital piano I use 90% of the time, and am also looking for the "couch" keyboard, but with some additional needs:

- ability to create (and export as audio) my own very simple, but accurate to the song backing tracks (that I can then assemble into a set list for playing along with on the P125)
- as a non MIDI/DAW source of additional sounds to add to the recordings I make with the P-125
- portable option for jam sessions, possible busking

Casio advantages for my needs:
- dedicated fill buttons etc for creating backing tracks, + 6 track recorder vs. only 2 on the Yamaha
- 32 registrations (useful for jam sessions + busking) vs. only 9 on the Yamaha
- velocity sensitive sound articulation (on guitars, basses, horns etc) vs. holding down a button on the Yamaha ugh

Yamaha advantages for my needs:
- BIG one: audio interface included in the USB->Device port (I have this on my P-125 and the audio recordings are stellar quality compared to what I get out of any external audio interface box that I've tried; and since I'm planning on making recordings with whatever I get for use with my P125 this is a huge feature)
- spectacular piano sample (they improved this drastically from the E363; the piano sample on the E373 blows the E463 out of the water there's no comparison)
- 30+ DSP effects
- "Super articulation lite" sounds; very cool for use in a recording (you have to hold down a button), the Casio velocity sensitive version is better

Basically the Casio would be the better choice for jamming/busking and the Yamaha for recording so I'm leaning Yamaha.

Curious how your choice has worked out

Have you considered saving up for a legit workstation? Your P-125 is already something of a lightweight starter-keyboard, so a $200 couch keyboard seems like a step sideways. I can't help thinking either option will come up short of your aspirations.


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Originally Posted by Piano Tone
Curious how your choice has worked out
I’m happy with the CT-X700, although I had the chance to play the PSR-E373 at a Guitar Center and I liked it too. If you're recording, the Yamaha could be the better choice due to the audio over USB.

I use the Casio to spontaneously work out songs I'm learning, and the 5 second boot time is a huge benefit. I'm not sure how long the Yamaha takes. I leave it on an x-stand and it is virtually instantly available, which is its best feature along with the two primary sounds I use and the keybed.

A couple of the advantages of the Casio that I expected to matter, really don't apply to how I use it:
- I've yet to use the AC adapter. I use Eneloop rechargeable batteries that last for hours.
- I use two primary sounds, the default piano (which is very good for the price point) and an EP. The 32 registration slots aren't of much use to me and even so, the 8 banks of 4 registrations are problematic as I have access to only 4 at a time, whereas the Yamaha provides 9 at a time, even though 9 is all you get.

With a 61-key board, I use the octave shift more than I thought I would. It's easy to do on the Casio. I'm not sure how to do it on the Yamaha. Also, the Casio is slightly larger than I thought it would be and the Yamaha is a bit bigger and heavier.

As noted in my original post, the accompaniment and recording aren't important to me (and I haven't used them) so I can't provide any insight there.


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I have a CT-X700 and my only real complaint is that the keys are plasticy and squeaky. But it is possible I may be wearing them out!

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There is a new Casiotone being released that could be an alternative to the CT-X700 and PSR E373 as a "couch keyboard" - the CT-S1. While it appears to be a successor to the Casiotone S200/S300, it has the AIX engine of the CT-X700. Retail is $199. No rhythms, accompaniments, splits, or display, although you can layer sounds, adjust the volume of each layer, and octave shift. Also, it's only a shade over 10" deep, runs off 6AA batteries, is less than 10 lb and appears to have an improved keybed. It has fewer sounds than the aforementioned models, but they seem to be of good quality.

It would be interesting to hear from Mike Martin where the CT-S1 is positioned within the product line.

https://www.casiomusicgear.com/products/casiotone-series/ct-s1



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