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Joe Muscara, Nathanael_I, Notes_Norton
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Original Post (Thread Starter)
by Anderton
Anderton
Analog tape smile

Yup. Sure, you can own the tape recorder. But then you get nickeled and dimed, or should I say dollared and tens of dollared, every time you want to record something new.

Compared to that, even the Pro Tools subscription fee of $30 a month looks pretty darn good...and the $15/month PreSonus Sphere is an effing bargain.

No, I do not miss tape at all!!!
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by Anderton
Anderton
Originally Posted by Chip McDonald
Rewinding a pain.

Fair warning: I am not making this up. I have actually heard people say during Q&A at seminars they preferred tape because they could sort of chill, and gather their thoughts while the tape rewound.

I recommended that after hitting "stop," they wait for a while before hitting "play." smile

Hey software companies who make tape emulation plug-ins! Here's your big chance to have a unique selling point! Have a preference that whenever you hit stop on the DAW's transport, play and record are locked out for 21 seconds. I bet people would just LOVE that feature!

Although my favorite "faux" plug-in is still Paul White's April 1 VST cable simulator, which attenuates high frequencies. The 15 foot emulation is $19.95, and the 30 foot emulation is $29.95.
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by Anderton
Anderton
Great post, and totally true. That "expectation of evolution" is exactly why I decided the concept of a traditional print book about music technology was doomed, and acted accordingly.

I think part of the problem people have with subscriptions is they don't want to deal with change. Cakewalk sold the Sonar program, but then you got free monthly updates. Although some people welcomed them, others (probably the majority) didn't want to feel they had to learn new things every month. Musicians are used to their tools not changing, but changing what they can express through those tools...look at the reticence to embrace alternate controllers, even ones with tremendous potential like the Roli Seaboard and LinnStrument.

Your observation about hobby vs. business strikes me as spot-on. I have a subscription to Office 365 and it's one of the best investments I've ever made. You get a tremendous amount for your money, the 1TB of cloud storage alone is great...but you also get desktop and online versions of almost all the Office programs. It's a subscription I'll happily maintain. Hobbyists are happy if something works. Often they have to squeeze studio time in between work and family or social obligations, and they just want to be able to fire something up and not have to think about it. So that works against dealing with things that change, but at least for me learning is fun. So many times it will take me an hour to learn new things that will save me hours and hours in the future.

Quote
There is a discipline to finishing projects and then printing out the right assets and archiving them. It isn't hard. It does take thought and effort. But I am not of the opinion that something like a particular plugin matters to any significant degree over time. Everything matters. But not much changes musical meaning...The only thing that lasts in digital audio is linear WAV files.

Again, I couldn't agree more. When I archive a project, I archive the project file in the DAW's format. But I also archive each track as a raw WAV file, and each track with all included processing. This has worked well for me, and I probably recycle projects more than most (e.g., creating soundtracks from selected song tracks, and testing new plug-ins/DAWs/etc.). The value of this was brought home to me while writing a new book. I took a song created in Studio One and brought it into projects for Ableton Live, Cubase, Pro Tools, and Digital Performer. Then whenever I wanted to show a technique or screen shot in any of those programs...no problem. I was actually rather surprised at how easy it is to move among a variety of programs that I hadn't used in a while. Between searchable help files and internet search, you can get the answer to anything in seconds. I'd never used elastic audio in Pro Tools, but 30 minutes later, I felt totally comfortable with it....because time-stretching in almost all programs works pretty much the same way.
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by Anderton
Anderton
Originally Posted by Notes_Norton
It works on Win 10 OK, but I keep an old XP ThinkPad around because it works better on that OS. If someone would revive and modernize it for today's OS, they would get some of my money. But I don't know how profitable that would be.

You should look into Cakewalk. It runs on Windows 10, it's free, and it has this feature called "Lenses" where you can focus on a part of the program, like MIDI, and ignore the rest in the UI and menus.You'll have a learning curve in terms of figuring out how to create a lens, but from there on, it will be just like Master Tracks Pro, with some added useful tools (like MIDI Effects).

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So many people have decided MIDI is dead simply because they don't know how to coax expression out of it.

MIDI is far from dead, it's literally on something like 2.6 billion device world-wide. As to expressiveness, that's a large part of what MIDI 2.0 is about, and Real Products aren't too far away. Of course, then you'll need a program that can speak MIDI 2.0 smile
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