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#973845 04/10/00 08:28 PM
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In another post, I was asked to relate some Rolling Stones anecdotes. I have been stalling on that question, although I intend to cover some territory there. For the Rolling Stones, I had to sign something called a non-disclosure agreement. I am precluded from talking about anything that might embarass or otherwise be harmful, or compromising to the band. As recording engineers, and producers, you become privvy to a lot of stuff that you would not know, or care to know. You work very closely with, and become, in a lot of ways "part of the family". Most artists don't require you to sign any kind of non-disclosure, but some do. Obviosly, you have a responsibility to do the best job that you can, document your work (mixes, track sheets, slate sheets, etc......but what about loyalty to your employer......not talking about things that are private and, or privledged......so what do some of you think about your responsibilities to an artist (not just big rock stars), aside from just recording and mixing their music. What moral obligations come into play? I have always tried to be loyal and ethical, even in very dificult situations. I have always had problems keeping my big trap shut, certainly.....I would love to hear comments and your feelings about this often times overlooked part of our jobs (oh yeah, more than a job, an adventure).
ec

#973846 04/10/00 08:43 PM
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Firstly, I feel it somewhat strange that you considered the question in the first place and didnt reply, sorry no can do straight out!!!.
I know theres a certain amount of information freedom and frienship on this site but when your considering your clients, well theres only one answer, you have to be completely confidential. This site is great for improving product and tech skills but talking about clients, I believe is wrong and I would not consider it, The last thing you want to do is lose your clients confidence and all the hard work you put in would be for nothing.
Sorry if I come across a little strong its just a big No No in my opinion.

#973847 04/10/00 09:31 PM
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Wow there's a lot of grey-area here.

Obviously there's a huge difference between telling us that someone had to recut the some part on tune X 4 times to get it right, and telling us that this same person might have brought 16 year old girls into the studio for sex.

Absolutely, loyalty to clients is supreme. But surely the Non-Disclosure agreement must outline where boundries begin and end.

Rich...

#973848 04/10/00 09:35 PM
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And for us, the interested parties wanting to actually hear these anecdotes... just remember... the imagination is far more interesting than reality.

Just the fact that they made him SIGN a non-disclosure agreement surely hints at craziness and debauchery!

Nuff said.

Rich...

#973849 04/10/00 11:45 PM
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There's a big difference in talking about techniques and recording methods, as opposed to things personal.
Many clients are jerks, sloppy, stoned or unwilling to do what it takes to make a great recording, but we have to keep it under wraps if we want to work. On the other hand, there's a number of people who are great in the studio and it helps to praise them for being professional and/or nice.
I think a 40 year rule works. We'll tell all in 40 years for a $10 million advance.
Eliott

#973850 04/11/00 12:23 AM
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Whew! You post some heavy topics, Ed.

I've worked with several individuals who's names appear in People magazine, but I've never had to sign an NDA - for that. Maybe that's because it was always a referral from a friend rather than from an attorney or agent. However, I would feel grossly disloyal to the personality involved to expose any human frailties that might have been demonstrated in private company. They have a public image to uphold, and a right to privacy.

I am not a lawyer. However, having worked for several law firms (entertainment law being a major dept in one) in a former life myself, unless the client has committed a capital crime that keeps one awake at night, there are some legal responsibilities clearly outlined in an NDA.

That NDA may also have required you to be bonded, in which case, you could also be finanically responsible for exposing matters specified in it.

You do always have the option of "being busy" the next time you're offered a gig that puts you in an uncomfortable position; or you could negotiate part of the NDA by being very specific in what would be considered a personal vs a professional matter. Sometimes a client can see that keeping "everything" private limits the amount of after-the-fact positive publicity that could be deliberately, or even inadvertently generated for them.

You also may be able to get an NDA "Rider" or "Addendum" drawn up for certain areas of the recording sessions, which then supercedes the original NDA. That may allow you to speak on things like how they have their amps modified or what mics/preamps, etc. were used.

If the NDA only covers embarassing or disparaging issues, then it sounds like their attorney already covered the "potentially positive publicity" ground.

So, if that's the case, there should be some cool things that happened that you CAN talk about...



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Larry W.


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#973851 04/11/00 12:33 AM
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I kinda figured that might be the case. No probs! I don't apologise for asking though!
Drum stuff was interesting...So I gather that THE ulimate room mic is the M50, I'd love to try a pair one day....Thanks.
Jules


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#973852 04/11/00 07:44 AM
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Some of the high profile clients I have dealt with, have taken tapes from the studio, that would be embarassing to them, and stop any bootlegging, as well.

Or if anyone was being put in a positon of witnessing some of their "personal" activities, they trusted that nothing would not leak out, stating reasons of job security.

A Non-Disclosure Agreement is pretty heavy, but I guess the clients warrant it.

But I still hear stories, form time to time, that circulate among the studios about some strange activities that were witnessed by someone working on a well known personalities' project.

You never know what to believe, so it's better just to keep your mouth shut.

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Bob.


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#973853 04/12/00 07:06 AM
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You should see the confidentiality agreement Roger had to sign for doint the new Steely Dan record.
http://www.steelydan.com/nondisclosure.html

Unbelievable

hehe

Doc

#973854 04/12/00 09:37 AM
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I live it.......it's a pretty tough contract to keep.
thanx


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