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#968731 07/21/00 03:28 AM
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1.) I have around $500-700 to spend on an amp and monitors, any suggestions? 2.) How does a group like n-sync get the vocals so clean? eq's, passes, compression, etc....?

#968732 07/21/00 08:56 AM
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Unfortunately, they do it by spending a lot more than $500 on their sessions, and they use good facilities with great gear.

Good gear + good studio + good group + good material + good producer + good engineer (- A&R input) = good record.

That's a pretty tried and tested formula.

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Harvey Gerst
Indian Trail Recording Studio
http://www.ITRstudio.com


Harvey Gerst
Indian Trail Recording Studio
ITRstudio.com
#968733 07/21/00 09:31 PM
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I teach chemistry and recording/singing is just a hobby. I realize you can't get some of the sounds (clearity)that professionals get without expecting to spend the money. But I still need some monitors and I guess I'am asking anybody if they have any tips they would be willing to share on recording and applying effects on vocals. Maybe even a good book I could buy.

#968734 07/22/00 09:05 PM
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Here's what my brother and I used to do in college with very limited budget and the results were not bad at all and we learned a lot:

1) if you can't afford great gear, use as little as possible - minimize the signal path - not a bad idea even with great gear.

2) get an SM58 or one of the decent "performance" mics like that - if you can afford an AKG C535EB, I think it is great for about $200. Use something that you know pros are using - don't try to reinvent the wheel - "Shure is sure".

3) mix with headphones and your home stereo - no sense blowing money on monitors and an amp that are throw aways. Test the mix in your car or at a friends. Even barely OK monitors are going to run you $1500 at least. So wait on that.

4) vocal chain -> mic, pre , compressor, if you have a bass cut or rolloff on the mic or pre, use it. Skip the compressor if you have amazing mic technique. I don't know any inexpensive mic pres, but we used to use a channel in a TAPCO (pre Mackie) board and it was OK; most pres today are probably that good. Short patch cables - just enough to barely reach to connect the gear.

5) look for a used Alesis Q2 or similar for reasonable reverb.

We were going for more of a Martin Birch style thing rather than InSync, which still holds up I think - those guys could probably stand a little touch of Martin Birch as well


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Steve Powell
Bull Moon Digital
Atlanta GA
music is a problem for everyone
you could hear things differently
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Steve Powell - Bull Moon Digital
http://www.bullmoondigital.com
#968735 07/22/00 10:54 PM
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I just went through this problem. I've been trying to get by with my NS-10 monitors for a long while.

I just finally bit the bullet and spent $1200 on the Mackie monitors. The Mackie's ability to reveal the whole whole sound from bass to treble in comparison to the NS-10s was a revelation about why I was not getting mixes that travelled well out of my studio.

I understand that near field Mackie monitors are a long way from what the pros use, but it's a significantly greater sonic difference, than the price difference between $700 and $1200

#968736 07/23/00 12:23 PM
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"Good gear + good studio + good group + good material + good producer + good engineer (- A&R input) = good record."

how does that apply to nsync? i see the gear/studio/engineer/maybe producer parts but the group and material???

and as for monitor/amp. i would go with a powered set of nearfields. they are going to run over the $500, usually @ $1k. really good monitors do run a lot but if you are never going to sink that much money into some, i think you will enjoy the cheaper ones. i DONT think you will find anything worthwhile @$500 for both amp/monitor.

and for the vocals, you want a large diaphram condensor. there are several that sound decent for $500-$1000. a nice mic pre would help also.


alphajerk
FATcompilation
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#968737 07/24/00 03:20 AM
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My 1 and a half year old daughter bugs me constantly to play "bye,bye,bye" (had to buy the tape), to the point where my fingers aren't fast enough to change channels away from MTV if they happen to play the video...oh how I feel like I've failed as a father....

I agree with the shure is sure, my beta 58 serves me well...the RNC compressor is less than $200, and ART has that tube MP mic pre for even less than that. Yorkville has nearfield monitors for $280 a pair. Get a set of headphones and check your mixes EVERYWHERE. But be warned...today you spend $500, but it will be just the beginning. Just ask ANYONE in this forum.


Raul

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