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#495257 08/01/03 04:09 AM
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Looking at the new Korg DTR 2000 ($250)

or

for $200, the Peterson VSI Virtual Strobe Tuner, or their newest version, the VSII which is just out now, and it has some additional features...like special tempered tunings for guitar, bass and pedal steel E9 and C6...and it is accurate to 0.1 cents...the Korg only +/- 1 cent.

Anyone have any experience with either of these two...especially the Peterson VSI or VSII?


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#495258 08/03/03 12:05 AM
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Hi, I have a Peterson, the first VS and I love it.....a few artists hate it though ....so I tune their guitars . It's very sensitive but highly accurate

Andy

#495259 08/03/03 12:57 AM
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I re-posted this same thread over on the Guitar Forum the other day...it got a bit more action than here.

Anyway...I was thinking about the Peterson VS1…then I saw they had a new version, the VSII...but after doing a bit more research...I think I'm going for their V-SAM which has a few more features that the VSII has, and is only $50 more.

I didn't ever think I would drop $250 on a tuner...but having considering the Korg DTRs at one time, which go from $200-$250...

...the Peterson V-SAM at $250 is an easy choice...it's just so much more accurate and more versatile than the Korgs…but I can see where if all you want to do is tune a 6-string...it may seem like overkill.

I wanted something for studio use where I will be using it on more than just a 6-string.


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#495260 08/03/03 09:46 PM
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It's definitely not overkill, even for just a 6 string. I use one live, and have the $800 490ST in the studio. even THAT is not overkill for guitars. It's so much faster and more accurate, you'll be glad you spent the money.

#495261 08/03/03 10:11 PM
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I see Korg DTR-1 in 9 out of 10 studios.

#495262 08/04/03 01:03 AM
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Quote:
Originally posted by Allan Speers:
...you'll be glad you spent the money.
I'm sure I will.

Actually, I don't think having a Hi-Q tuner even for guitar is overkill...it was what I noticed over on the guitar forum…that some guitar players seemed to question the value of anything more than one of those basic meter-tuners.

Oh, I was looking at the 490ST...cuz' then I could mess around with tuning my piano too. \:D
But it's a bit $$$…and though I may like the idea of tuning my piano...I don't know if I would actually ever do it!
The VS1 or VSII or V-SAM with all their features and 0.1 cent accuracy are all worth the money.
Musician's Friend is blowing out their limited supply of the older VS1 for only $170...but it doesn't have the pedal steel tempered tunings that I want...so between the VSII and V-SAM...I'm going for the V-SAM.

Pee...I'm sure you do see a lot of the DTR1 Korgs...they are older models and have been around quite awhile.
All the DTRs have the big, bright display, which can be nice in a darker studio environment...but none have the accuracy of the Peterson strobes...and these new, smaller/cheaper Virtual Strobes make it possible for more people to enjoy that accuracy….especially if you were planning to throw down $200-$250 for one of the Korgs...the Peterson Virtual Strobes are a no-brainer.
But I do like the fact that the DTR's are rack-mountable….maybe one day I'll go for one the big Peterson models…but in the mean time, I think I can easily miss the rack-mount capability…and there is also a lot to be said for portability too! I may not always be standing next to my rack when I need to tune an instrument…

Putting in my order for the V-SAM tomorrow.


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#495263 08/05/03 02:52 AM
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The korg reminds me of the front grill of David Hasselhof's super trans-am.....and is probably purged from the fridge size rack from one of the studio partners big hair days....which is all good....but the only reason not to get a Peterson in the past was $$$$$ which is now somewhat resolved in the VS series... I love mine

Andy

#495264 08/05/03 05:37 PM
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I think you'll be very happy with the Peterson tuner Miroslav... I've had my VS-1 for just about a year now & wouldn't be without it in the studio.

I haven't tried it live though, I have a Fender Cyber-Twin which has a built in tuner that works well enough...

I wish Peterson would come out with a rackmount version though I guess the size of the screen would be a problem...


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#495265 09/01/03 05:27 AM
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Just a follow-up...

I've been using my Peterson V-SAM the last couple of days to set up my pedal steel and my electric/acoustic guitars.

Well...if I didn't have the V-SAM I don't think I could have set up the pedal steel. The fact that a PS has more adjustments than regular guitars, was a PITA to begin with...especially since I've never had a PS before.
Took me awhile just to get the mechanics in order...but after that...without the V-SAM…the tuning would never have come out as good as it did.

I then turned my attention to my other guitars...and WOW!!!...I was amazed at how accurately I was able to get the intonation set. So of course, I decided to go over every guitar I have.

The acoustics are not as flexible, since they have no moving saddles for each string, but just using the GTR tempered tuning from the V-SAM, I was able to get a very sweet sound on 'em!!!

My electrics...what an awakening!!!
Here I though that the intonation was pretty close on them already...but with the V-SAM, I was able to fine tune it much, much better. Same on my bass guitar.
So here I am now...fine tuning each one, putting on new strings, and then using the V-SAM GTR tempered tuning on them...and man they sound sweet!!!

At first I thought that maybe I got carried away with a $250 tuner...but without it...I would never be able to get my guitars to sound this good.

Very happy with it and highly recommend the V-SAM to anyone that needs a very, very accurate tuner, and one that is also quite flexible.
If you don't really need the extended octaves or a movable root...then you can go for the VS-II which has all the other features and is equally accurate, but $50 cheaper.


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#495266 09/01/03 06:00 AM
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I bought the Sabine 7200 and sold my Peterson. (It was an older, 450 R model.)

Bill


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#495267 09/01/03 10:52 AM
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I'm with you Miroslav - I can't say enough about my VS-II. There's no other tuner I'll ever buy now that I've started using this.

miroslav #3057463 08/07/20 07:19 AM
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I am going to bounce this thread back up to the top.
Back around the time of this thread, I bought a Peterson VS-II Virtual Strobe Tuner at Guitar Center for well over $200. I was sort of wondering if I was crazy but I wanted it.

I was/am a guitar tech so it seemed worthwhile.

Today, while I was using it - I thought maybe to start a thread about the best piece of gear that you thought you paid too much for but didn't.
This isn't that thread but the Peterson is that piece of gear. It still works perfectly, despite the Mode button falling off and getting lost. I would have left it in Strobe mode anyway.
There are lots of adjustments and options but I've always left it in the default, turned it on and tuned.

It is still absurdly accurate and I have no idea how many hundreds of guitars and basses are now correctly intonated from using this valuable tool.


It took a chunk of my life to get here and I am still not sure where "here" is.
miroslav #3057606 08/08/20 05:32 PM
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The Korg tuners are adequate for tuning guitar but not accurate enough for setup or for anything else. They are not precise enough.

I found out the hard way when I tried the Korg for tuning my Rhodes. I've owned Rhodes pianos since 1978 and am no slouch on tuning them. The end result was the Rhodes was not in tune.

I bought a Peterson Autostrobe 490, that worked MUCH better on the Rhodes.

The Real MC #3057614 08/08/20 06:52 PM
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Originally Posted by The Real MC
The Korg tuners are adequate for tuning guitar but not accurate enough for setup or for anything else. They are not precise enough.

I found out the hard way when I tried the Korg for tuning my Rhodes. I've owned Rhodes pianos since 1978 and am no slouch on tuning them. The end result was the Rhodes was not in tune.

I bought a Peterson Autostrobe 490, that worked MUCH better on the Rhodes.

Yes,the Peterson stuff is most excellent.

For stage tuning I use a Boss TU-10 clip on tuner. It is accurate enough, much more durable than most, batteries last a long time and it automatically changes the display depending on the ambient lighting so it can be easily seen in bright sunlight or a dark stage. I won't use anything else, it's the best for gigging.


It took a chunk of my life to get here and I am still not sure where "here" is.
miroslav #3085313 02/18/21 11:47 AM
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A timely thread to bring back.

I have started tracking a piece, and was rudely reminded that my old Korg portable tuner is not cutting it for tuning my bass any more. Even when it says "right on", the Fender is clashing with the acoustic guitar.

I am contemplating the Peterson clip-on model, but some folks say the buttons are not very ergonomic/user friendly. Anyone have experience with it? I need something very accurate for tuning bass/guitar and for bringing along.

Thanks,
Claus.

Last edited by Claus H; 02/18/21 11:48 AM.
Claus H #3085328 02/18/21 03:17 PM
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Originally Posted by Claus H
A timely thread to bring back.

I have started tracking a piece, and was rudely reminded that my old Korg portable tuner is not cutting it for tuning my bass any more. Even when it says "right on", the Fender is clashing with the acoustic guitar.

I am contemplating the Peterson clip-on model, but some folks say the buttons are not very ergonomic/user friendly. Anyone have experience with it? I need something very accurate for tuning bass/guitar and for bringing along.

Thanks,
Claus.

I've been tuning my guitars and basses in the studio with the Boss TU-10. They sound fine. I double checked one guitar using the tuner in my Fishman Triple Play - close enough.
Studio work needs more precision than live, if I am really into it I tune everything to the Peterson mentioned above. It's 18 years old and still works great. It's not a clip on though.

Boss TU-10 is only $30 new and I found a Roland refurbished on eBay for $15 so now I have 2.


It took a chunk of my life to get here and I am still not sure where "here" is.
miroslav #3085414 02/18/21 11:06 PM
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Another Peterson user... I have the VSII. It must be 15 years old if its a day. It gets used all the time. Guitars, bases, keys, even with synth rigs that are not hard quantized (modular and FM).

miroslav #3085467 02/19/21 04:09 AM
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Thanks for the input(s); I ordered a Peterson, the new clip-on that's supposedly improved in buttons and clip. We'll see. I know their reputation. I also know their price tag, but I am happy to spend if it's good.

Last edited by Claus H; 02/19/21 04:10 AM.
miroslav #3085496 02/19/21 01:53 PM
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Is there something about a bass that's difficult to tune? I'm not a bass player and I let the bass players do their own tuning, but I'm curious, having experimented with different temperaments in the past.

These days I use a phone app - Pitchlab - for tuning my instruments. It's always handy, and good enough for old time string band music. wink What I've found about using it (or probably any other tuner - I have a first generation Korg, too) is that if I tune each string to the standard rather than the old folkey way of tuning one string and tuning the rest of the guitar to it, I can play for a few hours and don't need to re-tune. If I don't use a tuner, I'm touching up the guitar tuning just about after every tune.

Mike Rivers #3085622 02/19/21 10:49 PM
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Originally Posted by Mike Rivers
Is there something about a bass that's difficult to tune? I'm not a bass player and I let the bass players do their own tuning, but I'm curious, having experimented with different temperaments in the past.

These days I use a phone app - Pitchlab - for tuning my instruments. It's always handy, and good enough for old time string band music. wink What I've found about using it (or probably any other tuner - I have a first generation Korg, too) is that if I tune each string to the standard rather than the old folkey way of tuning one string and tuning the rest of the guitar to it, I can play for a few hours and don't need to re-tune. If I don't use a tuner, I'm touching up the guitar tuning just about after every tune.

Stand up or Fender bass? Stand up has a longer scale length so less tendency to go sharp when first plucked. Depending on the strings, a Fender bass will go a bit sharp on the low E at first when plucked hard.
Sometimes it's best to use the octave harmonic at the 12 fret to tune basses, that's usually what I do. Basses seem to hold tuning much better than guitars, often I will check the tuning on a bass and it doesn't need to be adjusted.

Using a tuner for all of the strings strings sidesteps the possibility (probability?) that the intonation of the guitar may not be perfect. That's if you are fretting a note on one string and tuning the next string to it.
If you are using harmonics to tune then you will cause a problem because the harmonic fifth (interval, not the fifth harmonic) is not the same note as the tempered fifth so you are introducing an error that compounds as you go up the strings tuning them.


It took a chunk of my life to get here and I am still not sure where "here" is.
miroslav #3085762 02/20/21 05:58 PM
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Craig made an interesting observation about polyphonic tuners that I've found to be true. This is a tuner that displays all six strings (assuming here that it's a guitar tuner), allowing you to strum across all the strings and see which ones are out of tune and how far. If you tune each string individually and get them right on the money, you'll find that some will be shown as out of tune on the polyphonic display. Craig postulated that no matter how rigid the instrument's neck is, the change of tension when tuning one string will change the bend in the neck enough to de-tune other strings. So you could be chasing your tail all day trying to get that right.

Of course it's the same thing if you're tuning individual strings and looking at a single-string meter display. But then you don't see how the tuning affects the other strings until you get there, and you don't always go back and check a string that you just tuned after tuning another string.

If you've never played with this kind of tuner, a smartphone app version of the DigiTech HT6 Fast Tune pedal is available for both iOS and Android devices. Find it at your appropriate app store.


It's a wonder how we ever get around to playing music with all this technology to help us.


Oh, and this reminded me that I hadn't seen my t.c.electronic PolyTune for a while and wondered if the battery in it had leaked yet. I found the tuner, and it was still safe, though the 9v battery was below 6v. Check the batteries in your abandoned gear !!!!!

Mike Rivers #3085768 02/20/21 06:35 PM
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Originally Posted by Mike Rivers
Craig postulated that no matter how rigid the instrument's neck is, the change of tension when tuning one string will change the bend in the neck enough to de-tune other strings. So you could be chasing your tail all day trying to get that right.

It's a wonder how we ever get around to playing music with all this technology to help us.
Check the batteries in your abandoned gear !!!!!

Having electronic tuners has saved many imbeciles from a swift death onstage. Trying to tune and the bassist is practicing his Geddy Lee riffs? Clip on tuner to the rescue, I can allow the bassist to live another day, or at least until the last set is over.
I am positive that tuners have save me hours of my life. I KNOW my Peterson digital strobe has made me lots of money and happy customers, Accurate intonate is always welcome.

Craig is a smart guy, no doubt. But if one string is just a little out (that's what usually happens with my guitars) and I'm using wider, thicker all maple necks, I don't think this circumstance will arrive or inflict to any notable degree. I doubt my Rainsong guitars do that either. New strings or you had to replace one on break and back for the last set, yes. But that is a new string thing. I don't have corrosive excretions from my hands so I don't need to change my strings often.

A Gibson SG with heavier strings? Yes, every time. Any guitar with a floating vibrato bar? Yes, every time. Bring cold guitar into warm room? Yes, every time, almost...

The strings on my 12 string Rainsong are a couple of years old now. been sitting in a gig bag in a cold closet for a few weeks. I just pulled it out and it sounds perfectly in tune. I know if I check it with a tuner there will be something that is just a bit off. But it won't change much. Graphite is very strong and very dimensionally stable under temperature changes. That and the humidity no longer being a factor at all are primary reasons I went with plastic guitars. It just turned out that they play well and sound better than just about any acoustic guitar I've ever played.

There are some guitars where all you can do is listen and enjoy, they just sound great. At that point the only rating system is personal preference. A friend owns a Guild like that, it just has a wonderful tone. I want to record with it, it doesn't sound like my Rainsong and the two together probably sound amazing.


It took a chunk of my life to get here and I am still not sure where "here" is.
miroslav #3086883 02/27/21 10:48 PM
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Happy TC Polytune 3 owner here.

dB

miroslav #3105342 07/25/21 10:29 PM
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To update: I got the clip-on Peterson, and it works very well. Takes a bit of time in that it gets down to the "fiddly" level of correctness, but once it's "on", you really hear the difference.


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