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#3091394 04/03/21 05:41 PM
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BMD Offline OP
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I'm thinking it's about time I learned to play piano

Do you know of any books that might help me?

I can't afford piano lessons with a tutor, so it has to be a book

Thanks

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Last time I took adult piano lessons, my teacher recommended this

https://www.alfred.com/alfreds-basic-adult-all-in-one-course-book-1/p/00-5753/

Working through this and Vol. 2 should give you enough of a start.

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Originally Posted by GovernorSilver
Last time I took adult piano lessons, my teacher recommended this

https://www.alfred.com/alfreds-basic-adult-all-in-one-course-book-1/p/00-5753/

Working through this and Vol. 2 should give you enough of a start.

Looks good. Thanks!

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My teacher used the John Thompson's series. If you are not going to pay for lessons, look for a YouTube instructor that you like and get what ever they are teaching from. For example, you can search John Thompson piano grade 1 and find a variety of videos of people playing the songs in the first book. You will not get any instruction but you can watch the fingering and try to match.


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Originally Posted by RABid
My teacher used the John Thompson's series. If you are not going to pay for lessons, look for a YouTube instructor that you like and get what ever they are teaching from. For example, you can search John Thompson piano grade 1 and find a variety of videos of people playing the songs in the first book. You will not get any instruction but you can watch the fingering and try to match.

Interesting idea. Thank you

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I agree with RaBid that YouTube has all the tutorials and examples one could wish for. Not sure about bassoon and how to make your own reeds but it would not surprise me.

Meanwhile, piano and guitar are very well covered. Persist and you will conquer!!!!!


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Originally Posted by KuruPrionz
I agree with RaBid that YouTube has all the tutorials and examples one could wish for. Not sure about bassoon and how to make your own reeds but it would not surprise me.

Meanwhile, piano and guitar are very well covered. Persist and you will conquer!!!!!

Thanks for the encouragement smile

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The cool thing about learning another instrument, even if you're not as good as on your primary instrument, is that you end up thinking in different directions and creating different types of music. I'm not a great keyboard player, but I'm good enough that I not only enjoy it, but sometimes the "mistakes" I make turn out to be quite cool.

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Originally Posted by Anderton
The cool thing about learning another instrument, even if you're not as good as on your primary instrument, is that you end up thinking in different directions and creating different types of music. I'm not a great keyboard player, but I'm good enough that I not only enjoy it, but sometimes the "mistakes" I make turn out to be quite cool.

Yeah, that's a good point

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I took up piano again around 2016 after not having played since childhood. I found the "Learn and Master Piano w/ Will Barrow" DVD set to be very helpful. I can actually play these days! I think they still sell it on Amazon.

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Originally Posted by Steve in VA
I took up piano again around 2016 after not having played since childhood. I found the "Learn and Master Piano w/ Will Barrow" DVD set to be very helpful. I can actually play these days! I think they still sell it on Amazon.

Thanks for the tip, Steve smile

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At the moment, there is a wide variety of online piano courses available on the Internet. Based on this, you should carefully consider the choice of software or courses that you will use to learn the piano online. I would recommend paying attention to the online application La Touche Musicale.
When developing this application, we tried to take into account all the needs of those who decide to engage in online learning. You can play piano anytime you like; you're not limited to practicing on a particular date and time. So, learning piano online is a very flexible method of learning how to play the piano. As long as there is a piano keyboard you can use, you will be learning.
Our app has a free subscription and is suitable for both beginners and advanced users. We understand that piano lessons require patience and dedication. Once you can grasp the methods and lessons, you can slowly move to a more advanced level and track your progress.
Our goal is to make learning to play the piano accessible to everyone, regardless of their age, wealth, or level of practice.
Therefore, I hope that this application will be interesting to you, and the information presented above will be useful.

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I find piano to be the most important instrument by far but you really need to determine what it is you hope to accomplish with it because it can be as complicated or as simple as you like depending on your goals and the musical knowledge you already possess.

It was my first instrument where I, like perhaps many others, was given no choice but to start taking lessons at 5. I wasn't overly enthusiastic about it but seemed to have some advantage due to being left handed and did well overall. Of course in the early years all I knew was to play the notes on the music sheet and try to develop some timing ability, it was a fairly narrow focus back then.
I really longed to be a guitar player though and eventually broke away and began to explore that. After a while I became enamored with the idea of mastering guitar noodling and that's when I began to explore music theory. I learned a great deal from that and so many years later I returned to keyboards bringing that knowledge along. That helped greatly in my ability to figure songs out more on the fly using chord charts and improv techniques.

So I'm not sure if I've actually made any kind of a point here but for me I know I'll never be a great classical or jazz piano player but I'm quite happy just being able to throw it down with others on pop/rock tunes and get around the keyboard with some rock/blues/country style playing and licks.

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Originally Posted by Greg Mein
I find piano to be the most important instrument by far but you really need to determine what it is you hope to accomplish with it because it can be as complicated or as simple as you like depending on your goals and the musical knowledge you already possess.

It was my first instrument where I, like perhaps many others, was given no choice but to start taking lessons at 5. I wasn't overly enthusiastic about it but seemed to have some advantage due to being left handed and did well overall. Of course in the early years all I knew was to play the notes on the music sheet and try to develop some timing ability, it was a fairly narrow focus back then.
I really longed to be a guitar player though and eventually broke away and began to explore that. After a while I became enamored with the idea of mastering guitar noodling and that's when I began to explore music theory. I learned a great deal from that and so many years later I returned to keyboards bringing that knowledge along. That helped greatly in my ability to figure songs out more on the fly using chord charts and improv techniques.

So I'm not sure if I've actually made any kind of a point here but for me I know I'll never be a great classical or jazz piano player but I'm quite happy just being able to throw it down with others on pop/rock tunes and get around the keyboard with some rock/blues/country style playing and licks.

How was being left-handed advantageous? With pianos geared towards right-handed players, I would have thought the opposite was true

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Another vote for YouTube here, it's how most young people learn just about anything nowadays. I also support the idea of a book however, because we all know that from time to time it's nice to not be staring at a screen. Maybe go through some YT channels to find one that suits you, and see if they have any recommended books.

Also, just a reminder that the good old putting on a record and playing along is always a good choice 2thu

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Originally Posted by BMD
How was being left-handed advantageous? With pianos geared towards right-handed players, I would have thought the opposite was true

It's more something I was always told rather than something I can attempt to explain or verify. I believe the idea is that I don't need to concentrate as much to get the bass lines under my hands which may or may not be true although it's for sure that I can't sit at the piano without almost subliminally banging out a steady bass line.

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Check out sites like Udemy.com


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