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I had no idea where it all started...I do now!

I think Eventide should get an award for elevating the genre of spam emails.

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I still remember my first digital delay sometime around 1980. No programs at all. I had the tempos of the songs memorized and would manually change settings between songs. My mind was working much better back then. I cannot imagine manually dialing in all those synth patches and the delay unit without a pause between songs today. You know, that would be a good alternate punishment that a judge could hand down to a working musician. ... "You must perform without the use of program memory on any device for a period of 6 months."


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db magazine was great. I only read a few copies I could get hold of, but it was great how dry and unapologetically technical it was.

There were some "digital/analog computers" that did really insane bit-wise math for control systems on Mercury>Apollo program boosters I bet led into the digital delay idea. That late 60's/70's era where "computers" were in a hazy sort of limbo between methods of storing states with the most arcane methods was such a pivotal point in every aspect of modern life.


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The Grateful Dead part of that post reminded me about a yacht club dining room we played in about once a month for 20 years. The dining room was huge with high ceilings and big plate glass windows on 3 sides to take in the view of the water and the docks. We played opposite the middle pane, I'd guess about 50 feet away and up about 4 feet on a stage. You could clap your hands and hear a second clap bounce off the windows. I estimate about 1/10 of a second. It's at sea level, in air conditioning, but I don't have the exact measurements.

The first time we set up it sounded like two drummers playing with that old slap-back echo they used on 1950s recordings.

The best we could do was aim the speakers in an X pattern aiming them at the opposite corners of the room. That created a hot spot in the middle right behind the dance floor, so we had the club refrain from seating anyone who didn't like a little volume there. We played a dinner set for about an hour and then cranked it up to about 100dba on the dance floor which resolved to 85dba in the hot spot.

After a hurricane, the club got remodeled, and now we play in the lounge, which has much better acoustics.

Notes


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I read that too, amazing stuff. Eventide was and is an incredible company.

My first digital delay was a Delta Lab Effectron. There was something lovable about how horrible it was. It was more fun than a Roland Space Echo because it sounded much worse.


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Eventide pioneered quality digital converters for the 1745, at the time there were none available that met their needs so they built their own. Those are probably the epoxied blocks on the circuit board (or they are the dbx modules?).

The finest compilation of digital conversion of audio is the AES Barry Blesser paper from 1978 CLONK

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The dB article is missing a page or two.

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Stephen Katz is on Linkedin

Stephen Katz

I love his tags - Engineering Noise Control - 2 years college 45 years experience

smile

nat

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What a fun read, really enjoyed that.

I developed a fascination with guitar effect petals back when I was in electronics school for a couple obvious reasons. First because I played guitar but also because they were typically fairly simple analog circuits that I could analyze and try to copy. Being audio frequency it was easy to breadboard the circuits and experiment without the inherent problems associated with RF. I really liked the idea of digital conversion and manipulation but that quickly became more complicated when you needed ADC/DAC, oscillators and +/- supplies so that never got off the ground during my earliest years of garage hobbyist activity.

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