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Crumar Mojo and Viscount Legend Live - how do presets work?
#3050993 06/25/20 08:29 PM
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Hi all

I'm getting very confused looking at specs for various clonewheel organs. In most respects I'm finding that the mojo classic or viscount legend live would be right for my needs, but I don't understand how they manage presets. They seem extremely limited.

I'm a pianist and keyboard player by background, not a Hammond specialist. To me, from experience with MIDI controllers, stage pianos etc, presets are very simple. You choose a sound, and all the effects etc. to go with it, save it, and next time you call up that preset it's all there. But I can't figure out how these organs relate to that. They seem to have only a few presets, which recall some things and not others, and have all kinds of weird limitations like disallowing percussion. Presumably this all makes sense to Hammond afficionados, but to anyone else it's just weird. You're designing an emulation in 21st century technology: why not use it to the full and just do things the obvious way? The only major player that seems to do that is Hammond/Suzuki, but I don't think their offerings are right for me for various other reasons.

For example I'm looking at the specs of the Legend Live here: http://www.organmusiccenter.com/viscount.html

Under "controls" it lists "upper presets 1/2" and "lower presets 1/2", but then under "drawbars" it says "Set A or Set B + 9 presets". ?????

Similar confusion with the mojo. If anyone with experience playing and managing these could summarise how it works, I'd be very grateful.

KC Island
Re: Crumar Mojo and Viscount Legend Live - how do presets work?
confidence #3051005 06/25/20 09:33 PM
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Well, as a start, the manual for the Mojo Classic can be found here, and about the preset at page 8
https://www.crumar.it/files/Crumar_Mojo_Classic.pdf

The preset only store the drawbar positions, and percussion are turned off.
Why ?

A Hammond Organ are a very analog thing, and if you are used to the real thing, you want the clone to work much the same way, and with all your buttons on the place where they use to be, and functions like the original.
Take the drawbars as an example. You use them in the melody, adjust them between verse and chorus, adjust for the rooms acoustic and so on.
If the settings are on a preset, it are much more difficult to do minor adjustments on a single drawbar, as you have no clue where it are in the preset.
So exept the two presets pr.Manual, what you see are what you get.
Some clones have motorized drawbars( so they change with the preset), other have Led buttons and lights, and finally some boards have a LED screen that show the drawbar position.

Mojo Classic have the name because it look and behave more like a classic Hammond I guess.

Then add some modern things like adjustable key click, drive, reverb and so on, things that are easy to change, but do not change to much the easiness of playing the organ.


/Bjørn - old gearjunkie, still with lot of GAS
Re: Crumar Mojo and Viscount Legend Live - how do presets work?
confidence #3051044 06/26/20 01:02 AM
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Here's an extract from the Viscount Legend manual, which is available here: https://www.viscountinstruments.com/legend-live.html (click on the "Support" tab; there is one manual for the Legend & Legend Live, and one for the Legend Solo).

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[From the Legend & Legend Live manual, p. EN-18:]

4.2 WHAT ARE PRESETS AND HOW TO USE THEM
The most famous electromechanical organs were also equipped with drawbar combinations through which
factory Presets could be used, without the need to manually change the position of the drawbars. These
combinations, which back then could not be modified by the user, were called Presets and could be accessed
through the first octave of the keyboard, characterised by inverted key colours and therefore called Black
Octave.

Legend and Legend Classic have a Black Octave for each manual and includes 9 Presets, that can be
recalled through the keys from C# to A.

Legend Live has two Presets for each manual. To recall them, press the buttons [UPPER PRESETS 1] and
[UPPER PRESETS 2] for the upper manual, or [LOWER PRESETS 1] and [LOWER PRESETS 2] for the lower
manual.
As in the original organs, the pedalboard has no Preset.

EDITING AND SAVING PRESETS
To edit and store a Legend and Legend Classic Preset, follow these steps:
1. Select the Set A of the manual whose Preset you wish to edit, through the Black Octave of the
corresponding manual.
2. Configure the Preset to your liking by adjusting the drawbars of the Set A corresponding to that manual.
3. Press and hold the [TRANSPOSE SELECT] button, then simultaneously press the C key on the Black
Octave. The LEDs start to blink, indicating that the instrument is ready to save a Preset.
4. While still holding [TRANSPOSE SELECT], press the Black Octave key corresponding to the Preset you
want to edit and save.
5. Release [TRANSPOSE SELECT].

To edit and save Legend Live Presets, follow these steps:
1. Press the [DRAWBARS SET A] button of the manual whose Preset you wish to edit.
2. Configure the preset to your liking by adjusting the drawbars of the Set A corresponding to the manual.
3. Press and hold the [TRANSPOSE SELECT] button, then simultaneously press the [DRAWBARS SET A]
button. The LEDs start to blink, indicating that the instrument is ready to save a Preset.
4. While still holding down [TRANSPOSE SELECT], press the button [UPPER PRESETS] or [LOWER
PRESETS] corresponding to the Preset you want to edit and save.
5. Release [TRANSPOSE SELECT].

----------
[From the Legend Solo manual, p. EN-13:]

The Legend Solo features four Presets for the Upper section and four other Presets for the Lower sections.
These Presets can be recalled with the [UPPER PRESETS] and [LOWER PRESETS] buttons on the front panel.
As in the original organs, the pedalboard has no Preset.

EDITING AND SAVING PRESETS
To edit and store a Preset, follow these steps:
1. Select the Set A or Set B whose Preset you wish to edit (to select the Set, use the [SET A/SET B] button).
2. While holding down the [TRANSPOSE SELECT] button, press the [UPPER PRESET 1] button if you want to
store a Preset in the Upper section or [LOWER PRESET 1] for Presets in the Lower section. The LEDs start
to blink, indicating that the instrument is ready to save a Preset.
3. While holding down [TRANSPOSE SELECT], press the Preset button you want to edit and store.
4. Release [TRANSPOSE SELECT].

----------
These instruments are designed to simulate the behaviour of a vintage tonewheel console, and therefore:
- only drawbar settings are saved in presets (other settings such as vibrato and percussion are not saved), and
- percussion is available only when the upper drawbar set B is selected (percussion cannot be used with a preset).

Re: Crumar Mojo and Viscount Legend Live - how do presets work?
confidence #3051103 06/26/20 09:58 AM
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Thanks a lot Paul. Do you use a Legend?

Re: Crumar Mojo and Viscount Legend Live - how do presets work?
confidence #3051104 06/26/20 10:16 AM
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OK I've had another look through the Legend manual, and I think it's becoming clearer. Actually I think what I was really looking for was this:

The user can select six different types of electromechanical organ from different periods, each with its own sound features.


and this:

12. [TONEWHEEL MODEL] (only available on Legend and Legend Classic models). Use these buttons to select one of the three general Tonewheel organ models. Each model was made to resemble the sound features of the most iconic decades when this organ was used:
- [TONEWHEEL MODEL ‘30]: typical '30s sound, without drawbar 16' foldback.
- [TONEWHEEL MODEL ‘50]: typical sound of the '50s and' 60s and is often used in jazz music.
- [TONEWHEEL MODEL ‘70]: typical sound of the '70s, mainly used in progressive music, pop and rock.
In the modelLegend Live,the tonewheel model is selectedthrough the upper manual keys. To select the desired model, press and hold the[TRANSPOSE SELECT]button, then simultaneously press the upper manual key:
- F5: corresponds to the button [TONEWHEEL MODEL'30] on Legend and Legend Classic.
- G5: corresponds to the button [TONEWHEEL MODEL ‘50] on Legend and Legend Classic.
- A5: corresponds to the button [TONEWHEEL MODEL ‘70] on Legend and Legend Classic.
You can also select the sound of specific Tonewheel organ models. In both Legend organs you can select these sounds by pressing and holding the [TRANSPOSE SELECT] buttonand then pressing the following keys on the upper manual:
- F#5: BC Model from 1936.
- G#5: B3 Model from 1956.
- A#5: A100 Model from 1961.


That's the kind of thing I had in mind, setting the instrument as a whole into a certain starting point before the manual controls build on that starting point. It's fairly limited, but I can live with that.

Does the Mojo have anything similar? Off to look through the manual again now. For some reason these things seem to take several readings before they penetrate my brain.

Re: Crumar Mojo and Viscount Legend Live - how do presets work?
confidence #3051108 06/26/20 12:18 PM
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Originally Posted by confidence
OK I've had another look through the Legend manual, and I think it's becoming clearer. Actually I think what I was really looking for was this:

The user can select six different types of electromechanical organ from different periods, each with its own sound features.
. . .

That's the kind of thing I had in mind, setting the instrument as a whole into a certain starting point before the manual controls build on that starting point. It's fairly limited, but I can live with that.
Just a clarifying note, and it seems from your post that you have this figured out, but it bears repeating: these different organ models (the Mojo has 22, I believe) affect the overall quality and timbre of the instrument, but are completely separate from any drawbar, chorus, or percussion settings. It's sort of like selecting from a Yamaha grand, or a Steinway grand, or an Ivers & Pond upright. But then you still have the same tonal adjustments to work with (I can't really think of a piano corollary to that because acoustic pianos don't really have on-the-fly tonal controls the way an organ does). So if you set the drawbars (or save a preset) to 888800000, that will sound slightly different on model '30 than model '50 than model '70. But that's a much subtler change in character than if you then change your drawbar registration to 888888888.

Sorry if that's adding more confusion rather than clarity, just want to make sure you know what you're dealing with. Dual manual clonewheels are marketed to a much smaller, more specialized group of players than, say, a Nord Electro; consequently they tend to be more "digital recreations of the analog instrument with all its quirks plus some modern conveniences" rather than "let's take a popular vintage sound and put it in a keyboard designed for the contemporary digital musician."


Samuel B. Lupowitz
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Re: Crumar Mojo and Viscount Legend Live - how do presets work?
confidence #3051112 06/26/20 12:55 PM
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These clones are trying to emulate the Hammond and its features. Some do an excellent job of physically mapping the controls (Viscount, Hammond XK5) so that a person who regularly played one could sit down and without opening a manual play it and know exactly what and where everything is and what to expect. So when percussion only fires on an upper manual with the B preset on a Hammond; so that is emulating on the clone. These are built more for the aficionado and there are still many, meaning there is still a market for this layout and control. There are other manufacturers who are less stringent about the functionality and form factor (modules as examples) and sometimes they allow percussion, as an example, to play in conjunction with the 9th drawbar. An aficionado would expect this and that is why these emulation are often called clones. Since you are not an "aficionado" perhaps an upper end hammond clone is not for you; maybe you should be looking at a simple module or a rompler that is less stringent and sometimes allow you to play "outside the lines" of the clone.


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Re: Crumar Mojo and Viscount Legend Live - how do presets work?
confidence #3051114 06/26/20 12:58 PM
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Originally Posted by confidence
Hi all

I'm getting very confused looking at specs for various clonewheel organs. In most respects I'm finding that the mojo classic or viscount legend live would be right for my needs, but I don't understand how they manage presets. They seem extremely limited.

I'm a pianist and keyboard player by background, not a Hammond specialist. To me, from experience with MIDI controllers, stage pianos etc, presets are very simple. You choose a sound, and all the effects etc. to go with it, save it, and next time you call up that preset it's all there. But I can't figure out how these organs relate to that. They seem to have only a few presets, which recall some things and not others, and have all kinds of weird limitations like disallowing percussion. Presumably this all makes sense to Hammond afficionados, but to anyone else it's just weird. You're designing an emulation in 21st century technology: why not use it to the full and just do things the obvious way? The only major player that seems to do that is Hammond/Suzuki, but I don't think their offerings are right for me for various other reasons.

For example I'm looking at the specs of the Legend Live here: http://www.organmusiccenter.com/viscount.html

Under "controls" it lists "upper presets 1/2" and "lower presets 1/2", but then under "drawbars" it says "Set A or Set B + 9 presets". ?????

Similar confusion with the mojo. If anyone with experience playing and managing these could summarise how it works, I'd be very grateful.

These clones are trying to emulate the Hammond and its features. Some do an excellent job of physically mapping the controls (Viscount, Hammond XK5) so that a person who regularly played one could sit down and without opening a manual play it and know exactly what and where everything is and what to expect. So when percussion only fires on an upper manual with the B preset on a Hammond the clone emulates the same functionality. These are built more for the aficionado and there are still many, meaning there is still a market for this layout and control. There are other manufacturers who are less stringent about the functionality and form factor (modules as examples) and sometimes they allow percussion, as an example, to play in conjunction with the 9th drawbar. As you are not an "aficionado" perhaps an upper end hammond clone is not for you and it sounds like you are not their target market; maybe you should be looking at a simple module or a rompler that is less stringent and sometimes allow you to play "outside the lines" of the clone as you would like.


57 Hammond B3; 69 Hammond L100P; 68 Leslie 122; Kurzweil PC3; GEM Equinox; Voce V5+; Neo Vent; EV ELX112P; GSI Gemini Desktop Module;
http://www.dyinbreedband.com
www.facebook.com/acoustaxx/
Re: Crumar Mojo and Viscount Legend Live - how do presets work?
Delaware Dave #3051135 06/26/20 03:22 PM
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Originally Posted by SamuelBLupowitz
Just a clarifying note, and it seems from your post that you have this figured out, but it bears repeating: these different organ models (the Mojo has 22, I believe) affect the overall quality and timbre of the instrument, but are completely separate from any drawbar, chorus, or percussion settings. It's sort of like selecting from a Yamaha grand, or a Steinway grand, or an Ivers & Pond upright. But then you still have the same tonal adjustments to work with (I can't really think of a piano corollary to that because acoustic pianos don't really have on-the-fly tonal controls the way an organ does). So if you set the drawbars (or save a preset) to 888800000, that will sound slightly different on model '30 than model '50 than model '70. But that's a much subtler change in character than if you then change your drawbar registration to 888888888.

Yes, I did basically realise that but I think you raise a good point which is that only part of what I'm used to hearing when changing rompler presets will be these changes of model. The greater part is probably drawbar settings, chorus and vibrato settings etc, which won't be part of this at all.

Re: Crumar Mojo and Viscount Legend Live - how do presets work?
Delaware Dave #3051140 06/26/20 03:33 PM
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Originally Posted by Delaware Dave
These clones are trying to emulate the Hammond and its features. Some do an excellent job of physically mapping the controls (Viscount, Hammond XK5) so that a person who regularly played one could sit down and without opening a manual play it and know exactly what and where everything is and what to expect. So when percussion only fires on an upper manual with the B preset on a Hammond the clone emulates the same functionality. These are built more for the aficionado and there are still many, meaning there is still a market for this layout and control. There are other manufacturers who are less stringent about the functionality and form factor (modules as examples) and sometimes they allow percussion, as an example, to play in conjunction with the 9th drawbar. As you are not an "aficionado" perhaps an upper end hammond clone is not for you and it sounds like you are not their target market; maybe you should be looking at a simple module or a rompler that is less stringent and sometimes allow you to play "outside the lines" of the clone as you would like.

That's kind of where I'm at already. But in a general sense, I'm quite keen to reshape both my studio and live setups around simpler, all-contained instruments rather than MIDI senders and receivers as I have currently. As I've always loved the sound of the Hammond, and there are so many high quality clones on the market now, getting one seems like a good way to do that. I realise it will involve a change of mindset; in a sense that's exactly what I want it for.

I think I'm getting the idea, and I also think a lot of things will be clearer once I actually have an instrument and just dig into it for a while.

It also seems that a lot of what I want can be done via the editor software. Not sure about the intended patter of using that though, Is it a "set and forget" - until you next want to majorly upgrade the instrument - idea? Or is it the sort of thing where you could have a range of presets stored on a laptop at a gig and send them via MIDI to set the Legend up differently for different songs?

Also curious about how this works on the Mojo and the DMC-122, as their editor software appears to only work from a live internet connection. Is that right? It seems ridiculous, given the inherent problems that can give rise to - why not just let people download it and run it offline like any other hardware editor?

Re: Crumar Mojo and Viscount Legend Live - how do presets work?
confidence #3051221 06/27/20 12:38 AM
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Originally Posted by confidence
Thanks a lot Paul. Do you use a Legend?

Yes, I used to have a Hammond B3 and M100, then a Hammond XK3c and XK1c; I now have a Viscount Legend Solo and I'm looking at a MAG C1 or C2.

My main criteria when comparing clonewheels are tone (how it sounds), functionality (what controls and connections it has), build quality, and serviceability (how easy repairs are if needed). Weight can be a consideration, depending on whether the organ is for gigs or home; prices can vary considerably in different parts of the world; and key action is an important factor for some players (Crumar have lighter springs, and MAG offer them as an option), but I can cope with slight differences in key action, and this is not a deal breaker for me.

As you have gathered, the Viscount Legends (which all have the same sound engine) provide three levels of control over the sound.

- (1) At the lowest level, you can select from six organ models: three "factory" (30s, 50s, 70s), which are fixed, and three "alternative", which you can replace with any three of your choice by downloading files from from the Viscount website and uploading them into the organ using the free software editor, which runs on a PC connected to the organ via a USB cable. The differences between the models reflect differences between individual instruments from different years, like slightly different tonewheel levels and percussion characteristics. You can switch between models "on the fly" at any time, by pressing the [TRANSPOSE] button together with one of the six keys between F5 and A#5. I sometimes switch between an older model (a little mellower) for jazz and gospel, and a newer model (a little brighter) for blues and rock, but the differences are subtle, and I mostly stick with the default model (factory 70s).

- (2) At an intermediate level, you can further use the software editor to customize various parameters like keyclick level, vibrato/chorus speed & depth, overdrive type, reverb characteristics, and Leslie speed & acceleration. These adjustments are global, having the same effect on all of the loaded organ models, and they are essentially tweaks that you "set and forget".

- (3) At the highest level are the front panel controls, including the drawbars & presets, vibrato/chorus & percussion tabs or switches, and knobs for keyclick, crosstalk, overdrive, reverb, EQ, and percussion volume & decay.

Re: Crumar Mojo and Viscount Legend Live - how do presets work?
confidence #3051234 06/27/20 02:33 AM
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I recently scooped a Hammond XK3c. I’m sorry to log in an entrance level question but where in the XK3c manual can I find how to tweak all the presets so that the mod wheel universally controls the Leslie?

Re: Crumar Mojo and Viscount Legend Live - how do presets work?
Lazydraw #3051410 06/27/20 10:59 PM
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Originally Posted by Lazydraw
I recently scooped a Hammond XK3c. I’m sorry to log in an entrance level question but where in the XK3c manual can I find how to tweak all the presets so that the mod wheel universally controls the Leslie?

The XK3c manual is available here: Hammond XK3c manual. Using the mod wheel to control the Leslie speed is mentioned on pp. 62-63. It says that the option is a "Preset" (rather than "Global") parameter; i.e, the setting is saved separately on individual presets.

Re: Crumar Mojo and Viscount Legend Live - how do presets work?
confidence #3051546 06/28/20 09:25 PM
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Originally Posted by confidence
Also curious about how this works on the Mojo and the DMC-122, as their editor software appears to only work from a live internet connection. Is that right? It seems ridiculous, given the inherent problems that can give rise to - why not just let people download it and run it offline like any other hardware editor?
The editor does not require an internet connection. In fact, if you're connected to the internet, it won't run! To run the editor, you do need a device that has a browser and wifi connectivity (e.g. smartphone, tablet, laptop), but the device cannot actually be connected to the internet while running the editor. In a sense, it only runs "offline."


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Re: Crumar Mojo and Viscount Legend Live - how do presets work?
confidence #3051565 06/29/20 01:38 AM
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Ah! Thank you so much for clarifying; I completely had the wrong end of the stick there.

So if you run the editor from your phone for example, the editor software is stored on the hardware of your phone? And then your phone's wifi capability is used simply to connect it to the Mojo, rather than a cable? Is that right?

Re: Crumar Mojo and Viscount Legend Live - how do presets work?
confidence #3051574 06/29/20 01:54 AM
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The editor software is actually stored in the Gemini/Mojo itself, and you run it from within the browser on your smartphone, the same way you can use your smartphone to go to a web page and run a web-based app (like Google Docs or whatever), but instead of going to the internet to find that web app, that app resides right on the Gemini/Mojo, no internet access required. So yes, your phone's wifi capability is used to connect it to the Gemini/Mojo rather than a cable, but the editor resides on the instrument, not on your phone. Your phone sees the Gemini/Mojo as a wifi hotspot, but when you connect to it, all you can access from your browser is the editor, as the Gemini/Mojo provides no access to the outside internet world.


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Re: Crumar Mojo and Viscount Legend Live - how do presets work?
confidence #3051590 06/29/20 05:17 AM
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Here is a demo off how it work and look like on the Gemini internal and external module.
https://www.gsidsp.com/


/Bjørn - old gearjunkie, still with lot of GAS
Re: Crumar Mojo and Viscount Legend Live - how do presets work?
confidence #3051595 06/29/20 09:10 AM
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That makes so much more sense now. Problem is, it puts the Mojo and DMC/Gemini back on my shortlist just when I was ready to buy the Legend.

Re: Crumar Mojo and Viscount Legend Live - how do presets work?
confidence #3051697 06/29/20 08:31 PM
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May I ask with a different approach? Should you use it solo or with a band, and what style of music ?
It seems like you want to travel light, since you are looking for a 73 note piano / HA.

I can get through most jobs with a single manual organ, since (most often) my one hand is busy changing the leslie speed, or manipulating the drawbars, or playing piano on another board. It can be nice with 2 manuals, but more for the possibility to have another drawbar setting ready on that manual.
Sometimes I play organ bass on the lower manual, but that are mostly when playing for myself.

I have gone from After 20+ years on real Hammonds Over through several clones, and have ended up with a DMC122 with Gemini exp for home use, and a Mojo61 in my band.
Remember that you can add a second manual to the M61 later, if you think you will need it.
You will also get some nice bonus sound with it.

Mojo Classic are Hammond only, but same organ engine.

Viscount have both the Legend Solo and Legend Live, but I have not seen an original lower add on manual for the Legend Solo.
I have not tried one, so I do not know them, other than from what I have heard at YouTube, Crumar have a little bit better Leslie simulator in my ears.

Nothing beats a real Leslie, so that might be your next purchase roll

So many keyboards, so few hands.

Last edited by bjosko; 06/29/20 08:33 PM.

/Bjørn - old gearjunkie, still with lot of GAS
Re: Crumar Mojo and Viscount Legend Live - how do presets work?
bjosko #3051704 06/29/20 09:19 PM
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Originally Posted by bjosko
May I ask with a different approach? Should you use it solo or with a band, and what style of music ?
It seems like you want to travel light, since you are looking for a 73 note piano / HA.

I can get through most jobs with a single manual organ, since (most often) my one hand is busy changing the leslie speed, or manipulating the drawbars, or playing piano on another board. It can be nice with 2 manuals, but more for the possibility to have another drawbar setting ready on that manual.
Sometimes I play organ bass on the lower manual, but that are mostly when playing for myself.

I have gone from After 20+ years on real Hammonds Over through several clones, and have ended up with a DMC122 with Gemini exp for home use, and a Mojo61 in my band.
Remember that you can add a second manual to the M61 later, if you think you will need it.
You will also get some nice bonus sound with it.

Mojo Classic are Hammond only, but same organ engine.

Viscount have both the Legend Solo and Legend Live, but I have not seen an original lower add on manual for the Legend Solo.
I have not tried one, so I do not know them, other than from what I have heard at YouTube, Crumar have a little bit better Leslie simulator in my ears.

Nothing beats a real Leslie, so that might be your next purchase roll

So many keyboards, so few hands.

Not gigging much at the moment but when I do it's mostly jazz, funk, soul, and also some reading gigs that involve being able to supply little bits of lots of different styles and sounds. I'm used to playing Hammond lead lines with my right hand, and programming a single keyboard with a split to make a lighter sound with my left. I'm just on a bit of a "holistic" trip at the moment and I want to be able to sit down at something that's designed all over as a Hammond, the way my acoustic piano is. As a trained classical pianist, I'm used to having a pretty independent left hand and playing walking bass, stride etc. under my right hand. So I'd like a dual manual organ to try and apply that skill to the Jimmy Smith organ trio kind of vibe, which is something I've always loved but never done.

Currently I use an Oberheim MC2000 88-note MIDI controller into some hardware modules and a rack. It's great in some ways - it's built like a tank, 20 years old and never given me the slightest problem. It's easy to program and I know it like the back of my hand. It's got a semi-weighted action that works "OK" for both piano and organ/synth parts so I can get by with one board. But the action's not fantastic, and I'm starting to find the whole MIDI connectivity, looking up what messages the modules want to receive etc a PITA. Sometimes for an informal jam session or something someone asks me to bring "a piano" and I just want to be able to take board, stand and amp, plug in and go.

So I figured if I'm looking to get a "holistic Hammond", but which can also function as a light-action MIDI controller for synth parts etc, it would make sense to complement that with a more firmly piano-action board with onboard sounds that can function as an all-in-one. Given how rarely one uses the extreme ends of a piano keyboard, I then thought it would make sense to get a 73 note one, which will help with load if I ever want to take both boards out. There aren't many, but the Grandstage seems to tick all the boxes.

Re: Crumar Mojo and Viscount Legend Live - how do presets work?
confidence #3051725 06/29/20 10:34 PM
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Originally Posted by confidence
So I figured if I'm looking to get a "holistic Hammond", but which can also function as a light-action MIDI controller for synth parts etc, it would make sense to complement that with a more firmly piano-action board with onboard sounds that can function as an all-in-one. Given how rarely one uses the extreme ends of a piano keyboard, I then thought it would make sense to get a 73 note one, which will help with load if I ever want to take both boards out. There aren't many, but the Grandstage seems to tick all the boxes.
I think the only dual manuals that are strong as MIDI controllers are the DMC-122 and the Hammond SKX. DMC has the advantage of pitch/mod wheels and aftertouch (plus most seem to prefer the Gemini organ sound over Hammond's... though being controllers, either way, you also have the options of B3X, etc.). SKX has the advantage of being a bit smaller/lighter, having more simultaneous MIDI zones, and a control surface/interface that is dedicated to its functions rather than generic, so I think simplified in operation. It also has a reasonable selection of non-organ sounds. Sweetwater has an aggressive price on it at the moment.

As for the piano, I'm not sure a 73 necessarily "will help with load if I ever want to take both boards out" -- e.g. an 88-key 24-lb PX5S is easier to carry around than a 73-key Grandstage.


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Re: Crumar Mojo and Viscount Legend Live - how do presets work?
confidence #3051726 06/29/20 10:43 PM
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But a 73-key Grandstage is easier to carry than an 88-key Grandstage.


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