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Re: In The Lab: Meet the ASM Hydrasynth!
Dr Mike Metlay #3043437 05/12/20 11:56 PM
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You make very valid points, Phil. It's not easy to deal with these things, and every manufacturer has a different approach. I am looking at it from the marketing side rather than the techie side - and by "techie" I mean both the code and the fans.

For example, Arturia just releases new patch sets with every firmware upgrade (which happens a lot, even for their "analog" gear) and says, "If you want to play with the cool new features, put in the new firmware and deal with the fact that you might have to adjust your old sounds."

This actually isn't as salty as it might seem to an old sysex hound; so many kids just use the presets in their boxes, even if they claim they love to program, that releasing all-new presets wouldn't bother many folks, and the ones that would be most affected are also the ones who are not going to ask that a slate of new and improved features be avoided just so they can keep their old sounds. If a new upgrade means your vibrato is off, but there are bunches of new features and fixes that you get to play with, I think most folks would be happy doing the tweaks. But that's just me.


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Re: In The Lab: Meet the ASM Hydrasynth!
Dr Mike Metlay #3043438 05/13/20 12:03 AM
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Well, I feel like I've been shoved through a clothes mangle sideways, but by God, I made it... I have all the remaining video content for the Hydrasynth series in the can, and I am uploading it to YouTube and scheduling it for release in digestible chunks every couple of days until it's all done.

Sorry there was so much of a gap, but when I finally covered everything I wanted to cover, I found I had one huge video, and I mean huge, that had to be hacked up and partly reshot to make it manageable. The folks at ASM have been very gracious about this, and now I can let them know that they can have their synth back any time, while not denying folks the material I'd wanted to cover.

Here's Part 8, which covers the Envelopes and LFOs:



Part 9 will cover the Modulation Matrix, Macros, and the Ribbon controller. Stay tuned, and thanks for your attention!

mike


Dr. Mike Metlay (PhD in nuclear physics, golly gosh) grin
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Re: In The Lab: Meet the ASM Hydrasynth!
Dr Mike Metlay #3043453 05/13/20 02:45 AM
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(Apologies to those not interested in these nerdy asides…just skip ahead to Mike's next post!

Just for laughs I took a quick look at the MIDI spec for this critter.

http://www.mecldata.com/download/asm/Hydrasynth_MIDI_Implementation_Spec%20v1.4.pdf

They are still using bit mapped integers like the old days, and I don't think there is an easy way to change the firmware to allow for greater mod wheel resolution without messing up existing patches. However, since sys-ex can be variable length, they could extend the current sys-ex with additional info, and make the new firmware length tolerant, and perhaps kludge a transparent change. A bit messy and inelegant, and future versions might just get worse in terms of coding, but the users would never know.

p.s. I'm guessing Arturia could have done something similar…but they're being lazy...)

Re: In The Lab: Meet the ASM Hydrasynth!
Dr Mike Metlay #3043655 05/14/20 03:37 AM
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Okay, time to cover the bits I haven't mentioned yet...

Envelopes and LFOs

There's nothing super-odd about either of these, but there are a lot of neat touches that are rare if not entirely unheard of.

The Envelopes are DAHDSR; the added Delay and Hold segments can be quite handy. More to the point, every stage of the envelope (except Sustain level, of course) can be time-synchronized individually, with each segment adjustable from a 64th-note triplet to a full 64 bars. In addition, the AHD part of the envelope can be looped from 1 to 50 times or set to loop forever, turning the envelope into a sort of user-shapable unipolar LFO.

The LFOs have the usual variety of waveforms, including three different forms of randomness - from Sample & Hold to a faster Random to full-on Noise. You can shift the phase of the waveform, and add a delay in onset after note-on and a fade time to full LFO amplitude. Once again, all of these can be beat-synchronized as desired. A Smooth algorithm lets you roll off transients for lag effects, and there's a One-Shot mode that fires the LFO for one cycle at note-on, turning the LFO into a sort of user-shapable Envelope.

Zen, baby.

The Mod Matrix and Macros

For most folks who are into creating synth modulations, the layout of the Hydrasynth's modulation architecture will be pretty obvious and easy to work with. For folks who have never done it before, the Hydrasynth's modulation architecture will STILL be pretty obvious and easy to work with, or at least get started. It's exceptionally neat and easy to use, better than that of many plug-ins that have a lot more screen real estate to work with!

Each row of four displays has three different modulation routings plus an index so you always know where you are. You page down, three by three, adding modulations for a total of up to 32 routings, not including the few hardwired ones (pitch bend to all Oscillators, the separate Vibrato LFO for the mod wheel, Envelope and LFO 1 to Filter cutoff, Envelope and LFO 2 to amplitude). Each modulation has a source, a destination, and an amount from -128 to +128.

The wheels and Ribbon and CV inputs can all be routed to any destination parameter; more significantly, they can be routed to control the amount of other modulation routings. It's easy to set Mod Matrix Depth for any of the 32 routings to be controlled by something else.

Macros exist on the home screen for every preset. There are eight of them, each of which is a miniature Mod Matrix of up to eight routings. Each routing can affect any destination, including existing Mod Matrix routings, and is controlled by either a knob or a button.

The knob's function is obvious: when the patch is being played, turning a Macro knob applies a scaled amount, positive or negative, to each of the eight routings in the Macro. The button has its own value setting that takes effect when it's pushed. One small drag is that you can set whether button behavior is momentary, push on / push off, whether it turns off other Macro buttons (like a drum machine choke group), or whether it acts as a reset-knob-to-zero control... but this setting is not only global to all eight Macro buttons at once, but it's global for all eight Macros in every patch at once! It's a single setting that's made in the System Setup page, rather than something for each preset. Another thing I'd like to see updated in future software updates.

(Speaking of the System Setup page, that is something you'll want to dive into using the manual... there's a whole metric shit-ton (that's 1000 shit-kilos, not 2000 shit-pounds) of stuff you can set up in there, everything from LED contrast to oscilloscope behavior to CV scaling to aftertouch tweaks to MPE behavior and on and on. It's a fascinating overview of just how much this damn keyboard can do.)

The Ribbon and Arpeggiator

The Ribbon and the poly aftertouch keyboard are such an integral part of the Hydrasynth's playing experience to me that I basically consider the Desktop version to be near-useless. But that's just me.

The Ribbon operates in three different Modes: as a pitch bender (mimicking the bend range set for the wheel), as a Theremin-style monophonic note trigger, or as a modulation source (Mod Only). You can set it to hold its last value when released, or to snap back to its default.

Mod Only has three further choices: Absolute, Absolute+, and Relative. Absolute is a bender-style operation, bipolar from the center; Absolute+ is like a mod ribbon, 0 at left to max at right; Relative starts from 0 wherever you touch it, and scales response by the distance you travel from your starting point. For example, in Part 9 of my video series, I show how hitting the ribbon near the maximum and moving to the right adds only a tiny bit of phaser depth, but hitting it near the minimum and moving all the way to the right brings in a much bigger amount. A lot of the presets make really interesting use of the Ribbon, with crossfaded effects, simultaneous triggerings in different modes, and more.

Theremin mode is fun to mess around with, but I am not convinced it will take the world by storm. You can set the pitch sweep to be quantized to any of a large number of scales, including a custom one you can set, based on a chosen root note; range can be 2, 4, or 6 octaves; and the mod wheel can work as a volume control, mimicking the two-handed operation of a real Theremin (if you squint and look real hard).

The Arpeggiator is a Berlin School wanker's dream. Eight of the many features under the hood have dedicated knobs on the front panel for fast tweaking: Tempo, Ratchet, Chance, Gate, Mode, Octave, Division, and Swing. The last four are click-knobs that access obvious choices in a hurry. Note that for nearly all of those, diving into the Arpeggiator Edit pages offers more choices than the click-knobs offer... finer Swing control, more different time divisions, etc. There are buttons for On, Latch, Triplet [footnote 1], and Tap Tempo, which can also be used to trigger individual steps in an arpeggio or Phrase.

The Modes include the usual up, down, up/down and up&down (do high and low notes repeat or not?), play order, random, chord trigger... and Phrase, which plays back a mini-sequence of notes and rests of up to 32 steps when you hold down a single key. There are 64 of them stored in the synth, but you can't customize your own. That's another drag, as having the ability to compose and store your own mini-sequences would be much more useful than choosing from a list of presets.

And so

One final note: during my videos, I was caught out once or twice by features I couldn't find documented anywhere. It turns out that when ASM does new updates, they don't include the features added in previous updates in the update notes, and the manual lags way behind on these, even the PDF version which should be easy to keep updated. You need to remember to find and read ALL of the documentation - the manual and the update notes for versions 1.3.0, 1.3.1, and 1.4! The more you know...

Anyway, you get the idea. This thing is more fun than I've had in years and years, and I will use the free computer patch editor to store all of my sounds for installation in my very own Hydrasynth when it gets here, and then, alas, off it goes.

Over the next week or so, my remaining videos will upload every two days until we're completely done. I will post notifications here when that happens. In the meantime, please do continue to ask questions and discuss this beautiful keyboard; it was a real pleasure to have, a real shame to have to return, and a source of eager anticipation for when I finally get to own one. I will miss it, but hopefully not for long.

Thanks for letting me blather. Over to you!

mike



[1]

Where are the dotted notes?

One thing I am still trying to wrap my head around is that while the entire time-based architecture of the Hydrasynth, including the Envelope segments, LFO times, Delay times, etc., allows sync via note divisions in straight, triplet, and dotted note values.... with one absolutely bizarre exception. The Arpeggiator will run straight and triplet choices, there is even a Triplet button... but no dotted values.

Am I missing something here? Not having dotted eighth notes available makes me wonder if the designers renewed their membership in the Berlin Brotherhood lately...


Dr. Mike Metlay (PhD in nuclear physics, golly gosh) grin
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Re: In The Lab: Meet the ASM Hydrasynth!
Dr Mike Metlay #3043771 05/14/20 08:36 PM
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Part 9 is live, in which I begin to cover the last bits of the Hydrasynth. This one is a lot of fun because I cover the Mod Matrix, the basics of Macros, and that wonderful Ribbon controller!

Check it out:



As always, comments and questions are welcome, and as always, thank you kindly for your attention.


Dr. Mike Metlay (PhD in nuclear physics, golly gosh) grin
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Re: In The Lab: Meet the ASM Hydrasynth!
Dr Mike Metlay #3043958 05/15/20 10:18 PM
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Finally got caught up on this wonderful review - WOW! So...with all those parameters and the extensive control it has to offer my impression is this thing is overwhelming. Not that it's difficult to understand but much like the Wavestate it seems tedious to roll your own patches from scratch. I think a lot of it has to do with the interface. While I understand the need for a matrixed approach it just seems you're forced to constantly focus in on one aspect at a time. Having the dedicated filter controls certainly helps some (except on the table top) but still.

So I'm interested in your impression Mike. People complain about the Andromeda being too complex. It's not imo but I do often struggle to find what's causing a particular modulation on older patches that I created. I can imagine this is that much worse in that you only see one "module" at a time. But of more concern - despite the claimed immediacy an all in one hardware synth is supposed to bring it seems programming is more of a chore and less fun than some complex VSTs.

Again, really super job Mike - one of the best reviews I've come across - anywhere.

Re: In The Lab: Meet the ASM Hydrasynth!
Markyboard #3043998 05/16/20 12:57 AM
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Originally Posted by Markyboard
one of the best reviews I've come across - anywhere.

for real, and by one of the best reviewers any of us will come across anywhere. 2thu


A reason why I collect old keyboards is that I feel partly responsible for doing it, responsible for preserving history and being a custodian for these things
Plus, old gear has a story. I like that.
Re: In The Lab: Meet the ASM Hydrasynth!
Dr Mike Metlay #3044049 05/16/20 07:32 AM
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FWIW, I think they've done an excellent job of balancing the complexity of this synth.

If you initialize a patch you basically have something like a minimoog. Pick your waveforms, adjust their levels in the mixer, and you've got an ADSR pre-assigned to the VCF and the VCA, and pitch-bend and vibrato mod-wheel is ready to go. You can just ignore the second filter, and pick the response curve you want in the first. Easy-peasy.

But if you want to do more, then you start exploring the mod-matrix. You can start off slowly. "I want a minimoog, but I want to add an extra wobble in the filter cutoff." No problem. Just assign one of the LFOs to the Filter Freq and bang, you're done.

The trick is to not get sucked into feeling like "I've got 32 mod-matrix slots. I better use all of them!" Ditto on the mutators and wave morphing stuff. Start with the init patch, and then add just one or two things from the big bag of tricks. After a while they will become as comfortable as the minimoog-like init patch.

In short, start with the basic patch. It's easy. Then slowly add more tricks. It will be a long while before you exhaust those!

Last edited by galanter; 05/16/20 07:33 AM.
Re: In The Lab: Meet the ASM Hydrasynth!
Dr Mike Metlay #3044363 05/17/20 11:03 PM
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Mike, I haven’t watched all the videos yet but just wanted to say a sincere thank-you for all of the work and insights that you have put into this synth’s review(s).

Re: In The Lab: Meet the ASM Hydrasynth!
Markyboard #3044608 05/19/20 01:05 AM
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Thank you all so much for the kind words and support! I wanted to address one comment beyond Phil (Galanter)'s excellent response:
Originally Posted by Markyboard
Finally got caught up on this wonderful review - WOW! So...with all those parameters and the extensive control it has to offer my impression is this thing is overwhelming. Not that it's difficult to understand but much like the Wavestate it seems tedious to roll your own patches from scratch. I think a lot of it has to do with the interface. While I understand the need for a matrixed approach it just seems you're forced to constantly focus in on one aspect at a time. Having the dedicated filter controls certainly helps some (except on the table top) but still.

So I'm interested in your impression Mike. People complain about the Andromeda being too complex. It's not imo but I do often struggle to find what's causing a particular modulation on older patches that I created. I can imagine this is that much worse in that you only see one "module" at a time. But of more concern - despite the claimed immediacy an all in one hardware synth is supposed to bring it seems programming is more of a chore and less fun than some complex VSTs.
In my experience, nothing could be further from the truth. It's a lot to take in... for about the first half hour. Then suddenly you know where everything is and you're just FLYING.

Yeah, there are 32 routings and who knows, you might need them all for something, but the vast majority of patches have 9 or fewer (three screens) and most of those have 6 or fewer (two screens).

Macros can get a little more involved, but they're limited to 8 modulations so they can't get TOO far out of hand. Besides, there's no law that says you have to use any, and the ones on the presets are great to learn from.

With all the power in the oscillators, you'd be amazed at how great a sound you can get with everything else just switched off; you don't have to use both filters, but it's easy to if you want; some very basic routings that you'll nearly always use are hardwired, but they all make sense... honestly, I haven't had this much fun programming a synth in as long as I can remember, and that includes my Xpander, which I adored for over 30 years but found programming to have a definite ship-in-a-bottle aspect to it.

I have never found any plug-in made by anybody that is as quick to program as the Hydrasynth, unless it's far simpler; one example would be the GSampler platform from GForce (M-Tron Pro and Virtual String Machine), which are very intuitive but have no modulation routings to speak of. If someone knows of a highly complex plug-in that is this easy to work with, please tell me about it!


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Re: In The Lab: Meet the ASM Hydrasynth!
Dr Mike Metlay #3044609 05/19/20 01:08 AM
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Oh, and before I forget:



We're done.

...or are we...? abduct


Dr. Mike Metlay (PhD in nuclear physics, golly gosh) grin
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Re: In The Lab: Meet the ASM Hydrasynth!
Dr Mike Metlay #3044672 05/19/20 10:54 AM
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Originally Posted by Markyboard
So...with all those parameters and the extensive control it has to offer my impression is this thing is overwhelming. Not that it's difficult to understand but much like the Wavestate it seems tedious to roll your own patches from scratch. I think a lot of it has to do with the interface. While I understand the need for a matrixed approach it just seems you're forced to constantly focus in on one aspect at a time. Having the dedicated filter controls certainly helps some (except on the table top) but still.

So I'm interested in your impression Mike. People complain about the Andromeda being too complex. It's not imo but I do often struggle to find what's causing a particular modulation on older patches that I created. I can imagine this is that much worse in that you only see one "module" at a time. But of more concern - despite the claimed immediacy an all in one hardware synth is supposed to bring it seems programming is more of a chore and less fun than some complex VSTs.

Originally Posted by galanter
FWIW, I think they've done an excellent job of balancing the complexity of this synth.


Originally Posted by Dr Mike Metlay
I wanted to address one comment beyond Phil (Galanter)'s excellent response:
In my experience, nothing could be further from the truth. It's a lot to take in... for about the first half hour. Then suddenly you know where everything is and you're just FLYING.
...

I have never found any plug-in made by anybody that is as quick to program as the Hydrasynth, unless it's far simpler; one example would be the GSampler platform from GForce (M-Tron Pro and Virtual String Machine), which are very intuitive but have no modulation routings to speak of. If someone knows of a highly complex plug-in that is this easy to work with, please tell me about it!

I think I would have to look at Pigments or Massive X. They're obviously way different from the HS but just as highly complex? Let's assume close enough to make some comparisons in this regard. The generous 32 modulation slots of the HS doesn't factor into the equation for me. It's cool that you have this flexibility but for my explorations I tend to max out at half dozen or so. My point/concern was can I easily see what's being modulated on any given patch? Or do I have to chase these things down one module at a time? Sticking with the Andromeda for comparison I can push the lit up mod buttons on the front panel until I find the one that's (often) causing me grief. But there are also those very powerful but hidden Croute modulations, i.e. the modulator modulators.

Now that's just modulations. But also viewing the modular like routings in Massive X (for example) requires switching to another page, or at least half of the main one. So not ideal and maybe Galanter's quote is applicable here as well. Whether hardware or software you can make anything complex enough requiring multiple pages/views etc. So for me it comes down to how transparent or distracting switching from one scene to another is, and how often I have to do it. And yes, I agree it's a trade off and one I'm willing to accept any day over less features. Still the HS is hardware and the interface is the defacto advantage over VSTs. Isn't that why everyone loves hardware and hates VSTs? So for someone spending 95% of their time programming on any given synth the hardware better not be constantly reminding me of trade offs and compromises.

Your experience and comments are honest and encouraging Mike (as are Galanter’s) and again for me this is the true value your reviews bring. Enough so that I look forward to spending some real time on a HS - whenever that's possible.

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Re: In The Lab: Meet the ASM Hydrasynth!
Markyboard #3044827 05/20/20 12:27 AM
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Originally Posted by Markyboard
Originally Posted by Dr Mike Metlay
In my experience, nothing could be further from the truth. It's a lot to take in... for about the first half hour. Then suddenly you know where everything is and you're just FLYING.
...

I have never found any plug-in made by anybody that is as quick to program as the Hydrasynth, unless it's far simpler; one example would be the GSampler platform from GForce (M-Tron Pro and Virtual String Machine), which are very intuitive but have no modulation routings to speak of. If someone knows of a highly complex plug-in that is this easy to work with, please tell me about it!

I think I would have to look at Pigments or Massive X. They're obviously way different from the HS but just as highly complex? Let's assume close enough to make some comparisons in this regard. The generous 32 modulation slots of the HS doesn't factor into the equation for me. It's cool that you have this flexibility but for my explorations I tend to max out at half dozen or so. My point/concern was can I easily see what's being modulated on any given patch? Or do I have to chase these things down one module at a time? Sticking with the Andromeda for comparison I can push the lit up mod buttons on the front panel until I find the one that's (often) causing me grief. But there are also those very powerful but hidden Croute modulations, i.e. the modulator modulators.

On the Hydrasynth, it's one click: MOD MATRIX and you're there. Plus up and down arrow clicks to go through routings three by three until you find the offender. Pigments isn't nearly as user-friendly or fast. This was the one thing the Matrix-12 had that the Xpander lacked: a Mod Routings page where everything was collected in one spot. Man, I missed that.


Dr. Mike Metlay (PhD in nuclear physics, golly gosh) grin
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Re: In The Lab: Meet the ASM Hydrasynth!
Dr Mike Metlay #3044838 05/20/20 01:07 AM
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I’m intrigued and can’t wait to give it a spin. Still I wish someone would come out with a system where every function and every modulation routing is always in front of you. No pages, no scrolling, no button pushing:

[Linked Image from res.cloudinary.com]

Never mind hider

Re: In The Lab: Meet the ASM Hydrasynth!
Dr Mike Metlay #3044877 05/20/20 05:33 AM
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Here's an interface idea that would help make patch forensics a bit easier.

Add to the mod matrix display…

option to display and edit "hardwired" connections (e.g. env1 -> Filter1)

option to sort display by source or destination

Last edited by galanter; 05/20/20 05:34 AM.
Re: In The Lab: Meet the ASM Hydrasynth!
galanter #3045418 05/23/20 03:15 AM
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Originally Posted by galanter
Here's an interface idea that would help make patch forensics a bit easier.

Add to the mod matrix display…

option to display and edit "hardwired" connections (e.g. env1 -> Filter1)

option to sort display by source or destination
Yeah, there's something to that. Maybe by rev 2.0...?


Dr. Mike Metlay (PhD in nuclear physics, golly gosh) grin
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Re: In The Lab: Meet the ASM Hydrasynth!
Dr Mike Metlay #3045419 05/23/20 03:17 AM
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It's gone. Shipped out the door and on its way back to ASM in California...

sigh

But I had a little time before I had to pack it, so... one last drive around the park....!



Thank you all for your attention. I will hopefully be getting mine soon and will be able to keep answering questions, but in the meantime, it's off to my next GearLab series I go!

mike


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Re: In The Lab: Meet the ASM Hydrasynth!
Dr Mike Metlay #3045463 05/23/20 02:01 PM
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wave Thank you Mike!! Bravo. 2thu


keys My Musicthx I always wondered what happened after the fade out?
Re: In The Lab: Meet the ASM Hydrasynth!
Dr Mike Metlay #3045483 05/23/20 04:10 PM
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just watched part 11. Fitting sendoff. Thanks for all you do around here. cheers


A reason why I collect old keyboards is that I feel partly responsible for doing it, responsible for preserving history and being a custodian for these things
Plus, old gear has a story. I like that.
Re: In The Lab: Meet the ASM Hydrasynth!
Dr Mike Metlay #3045486 05/23/20 04:44 PM
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What a wonderful introduction to the Hydrasynth, Mike. Simply stellar!




"... there's going to be a lot more coming from me in the near future."





rawk cheers 2thu

Re: In The Lab: Meet the ASM Hydrasynth!
Dr Mike Metlay #3045507 05/23/20 06:55 PM
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I bought one for my birthday! smile I absolutely love it. They just released a new version of the OS, which adds another mutator style. I've only had it for two days but I did a livestream ambient soundscape set last night with the Hydrasynth and the Kurzweil Forte7. Lots of fun.

https://youtu.be/_DTPgXnkt64

1 member likes this: Tusker
Re: In The Lab: Meet the ASM Hydrasynth!
Dr Mike Metlay #3045538 05/23/20 11:11 PM
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16-voice 5 octave version. I know they will....

Re: In The Lab: Meet the ASM Hydrasynth!
Dr Mike Metlay #3046072 05/27/20 06:00 AM
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Great job on the videos, Dr. Mike!

They finally got back in stock last wek ago at Sweetwater, I can't wait for mine to arrive shortly... It surely will keep me busy until the Osmose arrives (hopefully by the holiday season).

Manny


People assume timbre is a strict progression of input to harmonics, but actually, from a non-linear, non-subjective viewpoint, it's more like a big ball of wibbly-wobbly, timbrally-wimbrally... stuff
Re: In The Lab: Meet the ASM Hydrasynth!
Dr Mike Metlay #3046094 05/27/20 12:03 PM
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Thanks for the deep review. This has gone to the top of my wish list. My only worry is build quality. Not that the company has a bad reputation for build quality. They are new and have no reputation. My worry comes from getting so much for so cheap. I guess for that price you could buy two and keep one as backup. smile


This post edited for speling.
Re: In The Lab: Meet the ASM Hydrasynth!
Dr Mike Metlay #3046176 05/27/20 10:50 PM
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Okay...I bought one. Should be here next week.

I blame Metlay. grrr

dB

Re: In The Lab: Meet the ASM Hydrasynth!
Dave Bryce #3046196 05/28/20 01:12 AM
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Originally Posted by Dave Bryce
I blame Metlay. grrr

dB

Me too! Also, I'm here because of the videos. Nice community.

I ordered mine last week when Sweetwater showed stock. It arrived today. Holy Cow! Just beginning to explore and I'm already liking this thing. A lot!

Re: In The Lab: Meet the ASM Hydrasynth!
Bakker #3046200 05/28/20 01:48 AM
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Originally Posted by Bakker
Also, I'm here because of the videos. Nice community.
Thanks! Welcome... wave


Quote
Just beginning to explore and I'm already liking this thing. A lot!
I'm ready...hope mine shows up before the weekend. boing

Please do let us know what you think as you dive deeper.

dB

Re: In The Lab: Meet the ASM Hydrasynth!
Dr Mike Metlay #3046460 05/29/20 10:43 PM
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So, having the benefit of hindsight.... and in keeping with the discussion on KC re online reviews....
? How many hours would you be charging a manufacturer for a review of this depth?
? Having done this thorough review, how many hours would you charge the manufacturer to produce a 10-20-30? minute overview video that of course hits the highlights, but also gives new users a good take on how to get started with this synth? A video quick-start guide.
? Having done this review, how many hours to turn this review into a video user guide broken up into 10 minute segments covering everything you've done but more organized for a new user.

The problem with many digital products like this is how hard it is to learn. This review taken to the next level as highly organized user guides, your production makes an otherwise hopelessly complex board approachable. I'm sure there would be many many new buyers with this kind of approach, well worth the investment.

I imagine that only the bigger companies would have a budget for the above videos. But getting creative with the publicity department of smaller companies, you could come up with a plan such that there are different tiers of compensation coming back to you based on the sales volume.

You have a gift for making the incomprehensible approachable!

Last edited by Randelph; 05/29/20 10:44 PM.

Randy
Korg PA 1000 // Kawai ES110 // iRig Keys I/O 49 // Yamaha melodica, alto recorder
QSC K8.2 // Klipsch KMC 3 // Win10 laptop i7 8GB // iPad Pro 9.7" 32GB
Re: In The Lab: Meet the ASM Hydrasynth!
Dr Mike Metlay #3046801 06/01/20 01:24 AM
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Dr. Mike,
If the above post asks questions you have no interest in answering I'll delete it. Just trying to wrap my head around the logistics of someone like you getting paid a fair wage for so much work.

Thanks,
Randy


Randy
Korg PA 1000 // Kawai ES110 // iRig Keys I/O 49 // Yamaha melodica, alto recorder
QSC K8.2 // Klipsch KMC 3 // Win10 laptop i7 8GB // iPad Pro 9.7" 32GB
Re: In The Lab: Meet the ASM Hydrasynth!
RandyFF #3046909 06/01/20 04:51 PM
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Originally Posted by Randelph
You have a gift for making the incomprehensible approachable!


indeed. smile


A reason why I collect old keyboards is that I feel partly responsible for doing it, responsible for preserving history and being a custodian for these things
Plus, old gear has a story. I like that.
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