Music Player Network
Previous Thread
Next Thread
Print Thread
Page 2 of 2 1 2
Re: Transient tamer
jacotzen #3044255 05/17/20 01:56 PM
Joined: Feb 2016
Posts: 96
Senior Member
Offline
Senior Member
Joined: Feb 2016
Posts: 96
Link to the circuit please?

Re: Transient tamer
jacotzen #3044315 05/17/20 07:26 PM
Joined: Jan 2000
Posts: 8,828
Likes: 69
MPN Advisory Board
MP Hall of Fame Member
Online Content
MPN Advisory Board
MP Hall of Fame Member
Joined: Jan 2000
Posts: 8,828
Likes: 69
It's currently the first article in the Guitar | Bass | Amps page on craiganderton.org, and yes, the circuit really is that simple smile There's an audio example as well.

Re: Transient tamer
jacotzen #3044331 05/17/20 08:50 PM
Joined: Feb 2016
Posts: 96
Senior Member
Offline
Senior Member
Joined: Feb 2016
Posts: 96
Ahh. I’ve been using that one on bass drum mics for many years. The trick is getting just the right diodes

Re: Transient tamer
dboomer #3044346 05/17/20 09:36 PM
Joined: Jan 2000
Posts: 8,828
Likes: 69
MPN Advisory Board
MP Hall of Fame Member
Online Content
MPN Advisory Board
MP Hall of Fame Member
Joined: Jan 2000
Posts: 8,828
Likes: 69
Originally Posted by dboomer
Ahh. I’ve been using that one on bass drum mics for many years. The trick is getting just the right diodes

With guitars, you have to use red diodes to get the right breakdown voltage.

Re: Transient tamer
Anderton #3044355 05/17/20 10:27 PM
Joined: May 2020
Posts: 9
C
Member
Offline
Member
C
Joined: May 2020
Posts: 9
Thanks for answering all of my questions, Craig! Very much appreciated. I've put in an order for a 1590A enclosure, two 1/4" mono jacks (I was worried about quality here for a pedal that I will presumably never record without, so I got the Pure Tone brand, which seemed like the best of the best from my brief research), and 100-pack of 2.0 to 2.2 V rated red LED diodes for just a few dollars. Very excited to receive everything and get to work on building it and testing it out.

As far as question & answer #5 is concerned, can I expect that the LEDs will not light up at all while plugged in and strumming on my guitar? Not sure if it's relevant, but for instance I often play with a Tone Zone high-output passive humbucker bridge pickup (Output = 375 [whatever that means, it doesn't specify any kind of units] according to the DiMarzio website). If they're going to light up at all, I'm thinking I'll drill some 5mm holes in the enclosure and let them shine, but if they're not going to light up at all I won't bother and I'll just leave them to sit inside the enclosure unseen.

Last edited by callahan09; 05/17/20 10:29 PM.
Re: Transient tamer
jacotzen #3044372 05/18/20 12:48 AM
Joined: Jan 2000
Posts: 8,828
Likes: 69
MPN Advisory Board
MP Hall of Fame Member
Online Content
MPN Advisory Board
MP Hall of Fame Member
Joined: Jan 2000
Posts: 8,828
Likes: 69
Your pickups don't produce enough current to blow them out, or light them up. Sorry smile

1 member likes this: callahan09
Re: Transient tamer
Anderton #3044453 05/18/20 01:44 PM
Joined: May 2020
Posts: 9
C
Member
Offline
Member
C
Joined: May 2020
Posts: 9
Thanks, and no apology necessary, you just saved me however much time it would have taken to drill two more holes in the enclosure smile

Re: Transient tamer
Anderton #3044778 05/19/20 09:10 PM
Joined: May 2020
Posts: 9
C
Member
Offline
Member
C
Joined: May 2020
Posts: 9
Unfortunately I think I am in a little in over my head on this thing, as simple as the schematic appears (even to me, someone who has never looked at one until the past couple of days), it is still confusing me. I apologize for my total ignorance and lack of experience!

One thing to note is I'm not including a bypass switch. So I'm pretending that the bypass switch is actually just a straight line. Therefore, the schematic I'm looking at looks like this:

[Linked Image from i.imgur.com]

First, I want to say that I did read some "how to read schematics" pamphlets and "beginner electronics" books this weekend in preparation for trying to build this, but I don't feel I sufficiently learned everything I need to know before getting started with the actual build.

I don't know if I'm understanding the actual LED part of the schematic. The line intersections with dots mean the components at the ends of those lines are all joined together by wires, right? So it looks to me like both the positive & negative terminals on the diode get connected to both the positive and negative of each jack, and to each other? That seems like a lot of connections, so I feel like I may not be interpreting it correctly. I also don't really grasp how I'm supposed to make all those connections if I am reading it properly after all. But here is an point-by-point write-up of every single connection between the components that it looks should exist as I'm interpreting it. That way I'll know if I've got all this right or not:

Input Jack Positive, LED 1 Positive, LED 2 Negative, and Output Jack Positive all connect to each other.
Input Jack Negative, LED 1 Negative, LED 2 Positive, Output Jack Negative, and Ground all connect to each other.

That would mean that the positive lead on the input jack has wires going to each LED (one of them, its positive terminal, the other its negative terminal) and to the output jack. 3 wires total? And the same for the output jack's positive terminal. And then an additional wire between the positive of one LED and the negative of another. And then a very similar thing happening between all the opposite polarity terminals of all of these components, plus one to the ground.

What I'm probably misunderstanding is that a shared wire can make multiple of these connections, but I don't know how it works... I don't know, the more I type trying to explain what I think I understand and what I don't the more confused I'm making and the dumber I feel like I sound! I feel like I would understand how to read the schematic if I could just see a photograph of the actual circuit in the real-world where everything can clearly be seen to be connecting to each other. How many actual solder connections have to be made for this circuit? Even knowing that might help me understand how all of this works better than I currently understand it. I feel like one wire/connection might act as a bridge or something completing the same connection for other components in the circuit, like maybe connecting jack 1 to LED 1, then LED 1 to LED 2, then LED 2 to jack 2, would accomplish some of these aspects like connecting jack 1 to LED 2 and jack 1 to jack 2. I don't know if I'm making any sense... Anyway...

I also was wondering in a general sense how to ground the circuit? Am I supposed to solder the connection to ground as an actual wire to the metal chassis of the pedal case or something, or is that not what is meant for this?

I apologize that I probably sound like a rambling fool who understands nothing, but that's essentially what I am smile I expected this to be simpler than it is for me, sadly enough.

EDIT:

I found a really nice youtube video that explained the schematic junction points concept in a way that I think I grasped more clearly this time. Basically, when point A needs to be connected to point B and point C, and all 3 are interconnected with a junction point, you don't need a wire between A and B, and B and C, and A and C, you can just have two wires, one between A & B and another between B & C (as an example), and that circuit ends up completing the connection between A & C as well (by way of their shared connection to B). I think I'm understanding it now, at least.

By virtue of this new understanding, it seems to me that this new graphic I drew up could be an example of an actual working wiring between all points in the circuit:

[Linked Image from i.imgur.com]

Am I on the right track now? Basically, I would have the following individual soldered connections:

Input jack positive -> LED 1 negative
LED 1 negative -> LED 2 positive
LED 2 positive -> Output jack positive

Input jack negative -> LED 1 positive
LED 1 positive -> LED 2 negative
LED 2 negative -> Output jack negative
Output jack negative -> Ground

(I still don't know what the method is for actually putting in that "to ground" part at the end...)

But does that sound like I'm understanding how to build the circuit correctly now?

Last edited by callahan09; 05/19/20 10:16 PM. Reason: Added new findings
Re: Transient tamer
jacotzen #3044952 05/20/20 05:16 PM
Joined: Mar 2008
Posts: 3,755
Likes: 10
MP Hall of Fame Member
Offline
MP Hall of Fame Member
Joined: Mar 2008
Posts: 3,755
Likes: 10
OK, I am an electronic tech for over 50 years. Simplest way to understand:
Two jacks, one for input other for output. Assume in a metal box, with the ground side of each jack being grounded to the metal box (to shield and reduce any input point for hum and trash).
One solid wire between the "tip" of one jack to the "tip" of the other. And another solid wire between the "shield" (the outer part) of one jack to the other, with a bit of space between them.
Two red LED's that are connected in parallel, but are reversed between each other. One LED goes between the two wires straight up (most small LEDs have some sort of marking as to which side is the "anode" and which side is the "cathode." The other LED also goes between the two wires, but is bottom up compared to the first.

If this was a DC circuit (with limited current so that the conducting diode wouldn't fry), then one diode would be "open" and the other would be conducting. However, analog audio is not DC, but AC, meaning that the positive and negative alternate.
In truth, the diodes don't HAVE to be LEDs, much less red LEDs. All diodes are open in both polarities until the particular diode triggers, but the trigger voltage is different in different types. A regular germanium diode (not used much now) would trigger at a voltage of about 0.2 to 0.3 volts. Silicon general purpose diodes trigger at about 0.7 volts. The only reason for the red LEDs is that their trigger voltage happens to be at a useful point with the audio output peaks on the average modern guitar pickup, and this was determined by experimentation. As far as light from the LEDs, there would be light if the peak voltages lasted long enough to generate it (and the possibility of over-current damaging this simple circuit with no current limiting).

One could put a bypass switch in this by putting the switch so as to disconnect one end of the pair of LEDs (preferably the "tip" end); but presumably this is to be left in circuit all the time, since most modern recording is done in the digital domain, where distortion sounds horrible as opposed to the "warmth" added in the old tube circuits by slight distortion.
Hope this helps.


Howard Grand|Hamm SK1-73|Kurz PC2|PC2X|PC3|PC3X|PC361; QSC K10's
HP DAW|Epi Les Paul & LP 5-str bass|iPad mini2
"Now faith is the substance of things hoped for, the evidence of things not seen."
Jim
Re: Transient tamer
MoodyBluesKeys #3045012 05/20/20 09:22 PM
Joined: May 2020
Posts: 9
C
Member
Offline
Member
C
Joined: May 2020
Posts: 9
Thanks for the explanation. I'm fairly sure I understand the circuit and how things need to be connected now, but I'm just getting incredibly frustrated trying to actually build it. I thought this was going to be simple, it looked like a good beginner's electronics project, but I'm in way over my head. I can't for the life of me figure out how to solder this stuff together. I swear I need a third hand! I have a dozen extra 1/4" jacks that I got cheap, and 100 red LEDs, so I've got tons of extra parts to practice on, but so far I'm completely failing to even get one single connection done properly. I bought some wire for this project as well. So my first attempt at soldering was to just simply solder one end of a piece of wire to one lead on an LED. This took me over an hour, and it looks like garbage, it's all burned looking and mangled and the connection doesn't look solid at all. I probably destroyed the LED by getting the lead too hot if I had to guess, but I have no idea. I just *could not* no matter how hard I tried get the LED lead, the wire, the soldering iron, and the solder all lined up and in the same space at the same time to form the connection. I even resorted to placing the LED and the wire in vice grips, lining them up next to each other so that the wire is perfectly overlapping the LED lead, then all I needed was two hands to hold the solder in my left hand and the iron in my right hand, and even doing that, it was still nearly impossible. The wire & LED lead would just come apart. So I have to ask, am I just using the wrong connection or something? Should I be using wire at all? If so, should I be using stranded wire so I can twist the strands over the connection point so that they hold together on their own until I get the solder on? What the heck am I doing wrong and why is this so difficult for me? I'm feeling like a complete idiot over here with how insanely difficult this seemingly simple stuff is for me.

And to make matters worse, I should add that this is not my first time soldering anything! I must have blanked out how difficult it was for me in the past, or completely forgotten the technique or something, because this seems nearly impossible, but in the past, I have replaced the pickups and the 1/4" jack on my guitars before (albeit many years ago), and I don't recall thinking it was impossible then. I don't know why this seems so difficult and why it seems like I need an extra hand to do it this time. Unfortunately the memories and techniques I apparently knew in the past are all gone or not working for me today and I'm just really struggling and frustrated over here frown

Edit: OK, I am taking two steps forward and one step back, maybe? Maybe the other way around, one forward and two back haha. I have now made the wire to LED solder connection a few more times for practice, and some of them are starting to looking pretty decent. Using the vice grips to position the wire and the LED and then working with the soldering iron and the solder seems to be the way to do it, no doubt about that.

I'm not sure if my soldering iron is just so old and has cold spots or if I'm still not getting my technique right with the part of the iron tip that touches the wires and where to place the solder in that junction, etc, but I still struggle to get it going, and sometimes I'll hold the soldering iron for like 10 full seconds against the junction point and NOTHING HAPPENS, so I rotate the soldering iron in my fingers a little and then suddenly it all heats up. Am I struggling so much with all of this because my soldering iron is junk and doesn't heat evenly?

But at any rate, after I got a few good solder connections successfully, I thought, yes, OK, I'm going to be able to build this with enough trial and error and spare parts blown through that I'll eventually get it right. But then, I experience more frustration about what the heck I'm supposed to do next. I know that the LEDs (now soldered together at 4 points total) need to be connected to the jacks. I figured, OK, let's start simple, and simply put another wire into the connection at one of the leads. Well, this gave me far more problems I expected (as is typical with every step of this process so far). I got the wire lined up perfectly and start to apply the heat, and BAM, everything falls apart. The previously existing solder connection got DIS-connected from the re-application of heat to the LED lead. I tried for 15 minutes to get everything back together again, the first wire, the second wire, the LED lead, and get it all to stick together with solder, and I couldn't do it. I gave up. I don't understand how I'm supposed to have 3 pieces soldered together at the same connection point? It all falls apart when I apply the heat if I pre-connect two pieces, but if I try to connect all 3 simultaneously, I can't get everything to stay together in the same spot to actually get the connection.

At this point, I'm thinking I'm just a complete failure. I have no idea how to build this, and every time I think I'm going to be able to do it after all, another hurdle pops up and this one, so far, I don't know how to handle.

I don't have anybody here who can show me what I'm doing wrong, or show me the right way to do things, and I'm trying to watch YouTube videos and consult my book, but I don't know, this has all been so far over my head and been so frustrating for me, it makes me kind of sick with myself, I am honestly in SHOCK right now that this is this difficult for me. I really was not prepared for how hard this was going to be for me. How do you guys do it? How do you make it look so easy? I just don't understand. I don't know what to do from here.

Edit 2: After doing some research, oxidization on the tip of the soldering iron is a common problem causing it not to heat evenly. I used a wet soldering sponge and some solder and tried to get the oxidization to clear out for me to use this iron more easily, but to no avail. I think maybe I will just buy a new soldering iron. Also, my research tells me that solder can expire. My solder is about a decade old, so that's probably an issue as well. With a poor quality (it was cheap a decade ago) soldering iron which has an oxidized tip and some very old solder, could that be a reason why soldering seems nearly impossible for me right now? It's making me want to invest in a new soldering iron and some new solder, but I also have spent enough money on this project and I'm not sure I will be capable of building it even with new tools, so I don't know that I want to waste my money on more frustration and a never-to-be-completed project. Hmm...

Last edited by callahan09; 05/20/20 10:34 PM.
Re: Transient tamer
callahan09 #3045043 05/20/20 11:44 PM
Joined: Feb 2005
Posts: 433
Likes: 8
Senior Member
Offline
Senior Member
Joined: Feb 2005
Posts: 433
Likes: 8
Originally Posted by callahan09
Thanks for the explanation. I'm fairly sure I understand the circuit and how things need to be connected now, but I'm just getting incredibly frustrated trying to actually build it.

Callahan09 -

A couple of things that you wrote suggests that you're not using the correct tools. First off, yes, sometimes you do need three hands to make a good solder joint, and unless you're working on your car, vice grips aren't appropriate when soldering electronic components. And if your soldering iron tip is constantly getting oxidized, your iron is too hot, and may be too large for what you're working on. I'm still using solder that I've had for 40 years or more and there's nothing wrong with it so it's not that your solder is getting old. Are you using rosin core tin-lead solder? If you were up to date when you bought your solder ten years ago, you may have bought lead-free solder. It's much harder to work with than solder with lead in it.

You should have a temperature controlled iron with a small tip. It doesn't have to be expensive (some "soldering stations" cost $100 or more, but a $10 unregulated soldering iron or your grandfather's Weller solder gun won't make your job easier. Here's are a couple of examples for under $35 that will get you on the right path:

[Linked Image from circuitspecialists.com]

[Linked Image from circuitspecialists.com]

These are from Circuit Specialists, a company that specializes in tools and test equipment for electronics work.

Check out this "third hand"

[Linked Image from circuitspecialists.com]

And a small roll of solder will get you through a dozen transient tamers, and a half-pound roll will last you a lifetime.

Re: Transient tamer
jacotzen #3045045 05/20/20 11:56 PM
Joined: Jan 2000
Posts: 8,828
Likes: 69
MPN Advisory Board
MP Hall of Fame Member
Online Content
MPN Advisory Board
MP Hall of Fame Member
Joined: Jan 2000
Posts: 8,828
Likes: 69
Great recommendations, Mike! Thanks!!

Re: Transient tamer
Mike Rivers #3045051 05/21/20 12:43 AM
Joined: May 2020
Posts: 9
C
Member
Offline
Member
C
Joined: May 2020
Posts: 9
Originally Posted by Mike Rivers
A couple of things that you wrote suggests that you're not using the correct tools...

Thank you for your response, Mike, the more I learn the more likely it is that I'll someday be able to complete this project successfully, so it's much appreciated that you took the time to read my rant and help me out smile

I have two spools of solder and both are unlabeled. I went back and found my old order slip from when I bought them years ago, and one of them was a 10g spool of 63/37 tin leaded solder, the other was a 15g spool was lead-free. I was using the smaller spool before, so I assume I was using the leaded one, but I'm not 100% sure, so perhaps I should go ahead and buy some new solder anyway. Does "flux-core" solder work even easier, or should I just stick with normal 60/40-ish leaded solder?

As far as the soldering iron goes, it was a $10 iron with a pretty fat tip, 30W, no temperature regulation. Also kind of unwieldy because it just has a plug on the end that has to go directly to mains, and that stiff cord sort of restricts motion. It also has a very unsturdy, light-weight base that is prone to tipping over or being pulled across my work area from the tension on the power cord alone. I was thinking of ordering this one:

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B07ZK55NYC/ref=ox_sc_act_title_4?smid=A7LMAL3UOCLC7&psc=1

It will get here fast because, is reasonably priced, has good reviews... It looks to have a pretty heavy base that should make working with it pretty easy, and it has temperature controls, as well as a pretty fine looking point on the tip. What do you think of that one, is that the right tool for this job?

I am also going to get one of those "third hands" soldering station things, that is exactly what I need!

My next question is about the actual build, I don't think it was addressed before, so I'm still not sure how to do it, but how do I connect a single lead from the LED to both the input & outpack jacks at once? Basically connecting one thing to two other different things... Am I misunderstanding how the connections in the circuit can all be made without having to do that, or if not, then is that kind of connection actually soldered, as I haven't been able to figure it out yet...

Edit: Oh yes, and I was wondering, you said my soldering iron might be getting too hot, I was wondering if you might know the ideal temperature to set a temperature-controlled one to for this job?

Last edited by callahan09; 05/21/20 12:43 AM.
Re: Transient tamer
callahan09 #3045145 05/21/20 02:15 PM
Joined: Feb 2005
Posts: 433
Likes: 8
Senior Member
Offline
Senior Member
Joined: Feb 2005
Posts: 433
Likes: 8
Originally Posted by callahan09
I have two spools of solder and both are unlabeled. I went back and found my old order slip from when I bought them years ago, and one of them was a 10g spool of 63/37 tin leaded solder, the other was a 15g spool was lead-free. Does "flux-core" solder work even easier, or should I just stick with normal 60/40-ish leaded solder?
Flux core and 63/37 mean two different things. The two numbers are the ratio of tin to lead in the solder. You definitely want flux core solder. It's the flux that makes the solder flow from one piece to another.

I've never heard of the brand of that iron from Amazon but there are so many. It looks like it should be OK. You'll want to use a temperature of around 350C.

Quote
how do I connect a single lead from the LED to both the input & outpack jacks at once?

Connect a wire between the terminals of the two jacks that you want to connect the LED to Then solder the LED to either end of that wire. Looks just like the schematic, sort of.

Re: Transient tamer
Mike Rivers #3045153 05/21/20 03:11 PM
Joined: May 2020
Posts: 9
C
Member
Offline
Member
C
Joined: May 2020
Posts: 9
Originally Posted by Mike Rivers
Connect a wire between the terminals of the two jacks that you want to connect the LED to Then solder the LED to either end of that wire. Looks just like the schematic, sort of.

Thanks again for the advice.

I think I'm starting to be able to picture what it should look like and how the connections are made... Would this be a good way to do it?:

Connect a wire from input positive to output positive.
Connect a wire from input ground to output ground.
Connect one LED to the input jack, with its positive lead going to the input's ground post, and negative lead going to the input's positive post.
Connect the other LED to the output jack, but reversed, so its positive lead is going to the output's positive post, and the negative lead is going to the output's ground post.
Finally, connect a wire from the output jack's ground post to the metal chassis itself to ground the whole circuit.

I don't know why I couldn't think of it like that before, but it seems like all the necessary connections would be made that way, and I don't have to actually connect the LEDs to each other, which should be much easier to pull off, right? Or would this not work because the other of the components isn't correct? I have a hard time grasping how electricity actually flows through a circuit and how the order of the components matters (or not?), so any confirmation would be great. As far as the LEDs being reversed directions from each other goes, I'm not sure if it matters which one is "backwards", the one connected to output, or the one connected to input? The schematic kind of looks like the backwards one should connect to the input jack, but maybe it doesn't matter, as long as one of them is backwards and the other is forwards?

The other thing I wanted to know was would it be wise to buy some stranded wire, so that I can wrap the strands around the connection points so it holds together well, maybe making soldering easier? Or is the purpose of stranded wire something else and it wouldn't actually be easier or better to use stranded wire for this application?

Thanks again.

Last edited by callahan09; 05/21/20 03:13 PM.
Re: Transient tamer
jacotzen #3045182 05/21/20 05:29 PM
Joined: Mar 2008
Posts: 3,755
Likes: 10
MP Hall of Fame Member
Offline
MP Hall of Fame Member
Joined: Mar 2008
Posts: 3,755
Likes: 10
Yes - your last order should work. I would personally attach the ground wire as third step, before adding either LED (they are the smallest and most heat sensitive part, so get the heavy stuff done first.
Depending on where you are in the world, lead-free solder may be unavailable today. This all got started when the EU made it law that all electronic equipment, except aviation, military, and medical had to be lead-free. (note the irony: those three categories MUST work, everything else the working is secondary to the lead free). Manufacturers not EU based didn't want to build two different versions of each product, so they went lead free.

You might be able to file the tip down to get rid of the oxide (at least on one side) then "tin" it by applying solder till it is coated again, and that should look a bit shiny; on the existing iron. If you expect to continue building projects, invest in a temperature controlled iron. I still have a decades old Weller high-power solder gun, but it is totally unsuited for modern electronics, too hot, too big, and has to be heated up each connection. My primary iron is a Weller temperature controlled variable temp that I purchased decades ago. Don't do as much soldering as I used to, and the tip is probably 25 years old now.

Solder: Make SURE that the solder is rosin flux instead of acid flux. Acid is only usable in things like plumbing copper lines, which are no longer in favor in many parts of the world.

The jacks should have terminals with a hole in them. You run the wire through the hole, and use needle-nosed pliers to bend it around. This way, it doesn't fall out before soldering, and you have a good basis connection for the older

My order of things for your project: Get the box, drill the holes for the jacks in the box with a little extra space between the jacks, run the hot wire, the ground side wire, and the ground to box. They only need to be 60 to 100 cm long for something like this, solid wire would be easiest, but not required. Even uninsulated wire on this short run inside a metal box is OK. After all that is soldered, quickly solder in one LED to the input jack using the existing solder pad where you soldered the wires, then the other LED (reversed polarity) to the output jack. Techs call that "tacking" the diode in place. Inspect the job. If OK, then put the lid on the box and use it.


Howard Grand|Hamm SK1-73|Kurz PC2|PC2X|PC3|PC3X|PC361; QSC K10's
HP DAW|Epi Les Paul & LP 5-str bass|iPad mini2
"Now faith is the substance of things hoped for, the evidence of things not seen."
Jim
1 member likes this: callahan09
Re: Transient tamer
MoodyBluesKeys #3045189 05/21/20 06:10 PM
Joined: May 2020
Posts: 9
C
Member
Offline
Member
C
Joined: May 2020
Posts: 9
Originally Posted by MoodyBluesKeys
Yes - your last order should work...

Thank you so much for your detailed explanation of everything, this all is starting to make a lot more sense to me now! I will be ordering a new soldering iron and some new solder today and hopefully later next week I'll have everything and be able to get this put together.

Re: Transient tamer
callahan09 #3045217 05/21/20 09:09 PM
Joined: Feb 2005
Posts: 433
Likes: 8
Senior Member
Offline
Senior Member
Joined: Feb 2005
Posts: 433
Likes: 8
Originally Posted by callahan09
I think I'm starting to be able to picture what it should look like and how the connections are made... Would this be a good way to do it?:


[Linked Image from i.imgur.com]


Quote
Connect a wire from input positive to output positive.
Connect a wire from input ground to output ground.
Connect one LED to the input jack, with its positive lead going to the input's ground post, and negative lead going to the input's positive post.
Connect the other LED to the output jack, but reversed, so its positive lead is going to the output's positive post, and the negative lead is going to the output's ground post.
Finally, connect a wire from the output jack's ground post to the metal chassis itself to ground the whole circuit.

Yes, that will work. If you're using a metal box, the jack's ground terminal is mechanically connected to the box, so you already have ground connected to ground, and that's connected to the box. But you can put a wire between the jacks' ground terminal anyway.

Quote
I don't know why I couldn't think of it like that before, but it seems like all the necessary connections would be made that way, and I don't have to actually connect the LEDs to each other, which should be much easier to pull off, right? I'm not sure if it matters which one is "backwards", the one connected to output, or the one connected to input?

In this circuit, it doesn't matter which polarity of the diode is connected to which jack as long as the other diode is connected in the opposite polarity. In fact, it doesn't matter which jack is the input and which is the output. You can hook it up either way.

Do you understand the concept of alternating current, where the input signal is positive with respect to ground for part of the cycle, and flips over to be negative for the other part of the cycle? The current flows through a diode in only one direction, the direction of the arrow. So during half of the cycle one conducts (and hence attenuates the transient), and the other diode does exactly the same thing for the other half of the cycle.

Quote
The other thing I wanted to know was would it be wise to buy some stranded wire, so that I can wrap the strands around the connection points so it holds together well, maybe making soldering easier?

For a simple point-to-point project like this, solid wire would probably be easier to work with, because you can form it into a hook, hook it through the hole in the jack terminal, and crimp it so that it stays in place by itself. That will make your soldering much easier.

This video shows how your connection and solder job should look.


1 member likes this: callahan09
Re: Transient tamer
Mike Rivers #3045246 05/22/20 12:02 AM
Joined: May 2020
Posts: 9
C
Member
Offline
Member
C
Joined: May 2020
Posts: 9
Originally Posted by Mike Rivers
If you're using a metal box, the jack's ground terminal is mechanically connected to the box, so you already have ground connected to ground, and that's connected to the box. But you can put a wire between the jacks' ground terminal anyway.

Oh wow, that's really convenient! So by screwing the jack into the hole I'm going to drill in my metal box, it will already be grounded, therefore no "wire to ground" is necessary. Thanks for informing me about that. Out of curiosity, what would happen if the circuit was NOT grounded? Would it potentially damage anything, or would it just not pass the signal along through the output jack?

Originally Posted by Mike Rivers
In fact, it doesn't matter which jack is the input and which is the output. You can hook it up either way.

So just to be clear, what you're saying is that I could plug my guitar into either jack once the pedal is finished, and whichever one I plug into, that'll be the input jack? Then the other one, going out to my audio interface, that'd be the output jack. It doesn't actually matter which jack I use when I plug in? OR, are you just saying it doesn't matter which jack I decide to make the input jack, but once the circuit is built, one of them is definitely the input jack and the other is always supposed to be the output? Sorry for my confusion...

And thank you again for all the tips and info you've provided! I get more and more confident that I understand what to do and how this all works the more you all here have responded to me, so I deeply and truly appreciate that you've been patient with me and helped me through all of this!

Re: Transient tamer
callahan09 #3045314 05/22/20 01:14 PM
Joined: Feb 2005
Posts: 433
Likes: 8
Senior Member
Offline
Senior Member
Joined: Feb 2005
Posts: 433
Likes: 8
Originally Posted by callahan09
Originally Posted by Mike Rivers
If you're using a metal box, the jack's ground terminal is mechanically connected to the box, so you already have ground connected to ground, and that's connected to the box. But you can put a wire between the jacks' ground terminal anyway.

Oh wow, that's really convenient! So by screwing the jack into the hole I'm going to drill in my metal box, it will already be grounded, therefore no "wire to ground" is necessary. Thanks for informing me about that. Out of curiosity, what would happen if the circuit was NOT grounded? Would it potentially damage anything, or would it just not pass the signal along through the output jack?

There are phone jacks that have the ground (shield) terminal isolated from the metal mounting bushing, but if you're using the more conventional kind like the one shown in the soldering video, then you're OK in using the metal chassis for the "ground" connection. If you had isolated jacks and didn't connect their shield terminals together, then you wouldn't have a complete circuit and it wouldn't work. Nothing would be damaged, however, except maybe your pride.

Quote
So just to be clear, what you're saying is that I could plug my guitar into either jack once the pedal is finished, and whichever one I plug into, that'll be the input jack? Then the other one, going out to my audio interface, that'd be the output jack. It doesn't actually matter which jack I use when I plug in?

That's correct for this particular circuit, because it's symmetrical as far as signal flow goes. If you were to be building, say, an amplifier, that would have definite input and output connections and it won't work if they're reversed.

1 member likes this: callahan09
Page 2 of 2 1 2

Moderated by  Anderton 

Link Copied to Clipboard
Powered by UBB.threads™ PHP Forum Software 7.7.4