Music Player Network Home Guitar Player Magazine Keyboard Magazine Bass Player Magazine EQ Magazine
Page 2 of 2 < 1 2
Topic Options
#2980075 - 03/14/19 08:11 AM Re: OT: New [to me] Word of the day; bestie [Re: GregC]
Losendoskeys Offline
Platinum Member

Registered: 12/28/12
Posts: 1444
Loc: West Sussex, UK
The last example of growth of American English I heard is "super super" and it has transferred over to the UK.
Talk about pissing in the wind and getting it back in your face!

I am appalled at the lack of vocabulary that someone has that they have to repeat something in that fashion.
It is superceded only by "super cool" -Christ on a bike, can't they come up with a tad more descriptive language deadhorse
_________________________
Yamaha CP70B;Roland XP30/AXSynth/Fantom/FA76/XR;Hammond XK3C SK2; Korg Kronos 73;ProSoloist Rack+; ARP ProSoloist; Mellotron M4000D; GEM Promega2; Hohner Pianet N, Roland V-Grand,Voyager XL, RMI

Top
KC Island
#2980144 - 03/14/19 04:07 PM Re: OT: New [to me] Word of the day; bestie [Re: Losendoskeys]
CowboyNQ Offline
Platinum Member

Registered: 06/14/15
Posts: 1181
Loc: Adelaide, Australia
I am an English language mentor (on a volunteer basis) to new arrivals in Australia. The thrust of the mentoring is not around understanding grammar and syntax per se, but more in relation to being able to speak and comprehend conversational Australian English. The theory being this will lead to faster social inclusion and better employment opportunities.

Many of the people I have worked with come here with quite a reasonable "book knowledge" of the language, but with little ability to use it functionally in conversation. The texts they are learning from are often too rigid and a little anachronistic.

I'm often discussing the differences between British, American and Australian English with them, it's a lot of fun and quite fascinating.

FWIW most of my students find Americans (via TV shows) far easier to understand than Aussies. Generalising of course but this is because, our unusual accent aside, we tend to drawl and are lazy with our articulation of consonants. There are also quite a few words that Americans tend to pronounce more phonetically and logically.

Many Aussies also seed their conversation with colloquialisms (which differ dependent upon age and sex) and are very fond of metaphor, simile and dry humour. At first blush, this is quite confronting for folks who have English as a second language.

All of the above said, I feel that when considering conversational English, it's misleading to say "American English" and "British English" because there are so many significant regional variations within those countries. We have regional dialects too but you have to have a very good ear and have travelled quite a bit to pick them. Most Aussies can't, and foreigners definitely can't. They're "flat out" understanding us in the first place!

TL;DR - my vicarious experience is that American English (as we experience it here) is quite a bit nicer to deal with than Australian English for those coming to grips with the language as a learner.

Top
#2980195 - 03/15/19 04:21 AM Re: OT: New [to me] Word of the day; bestie [Re: CowboyNQ]
Rod S Offline
MP Hall of Fame Member

Registered: 12/12/00
Posts: 3174
Loc: São Paulo, Brasil
Originally Posted By: CowboyNQ
Many of the people I have worked with come here with quite a reasonable "book knowledge" of the language, but with little ability to use it functionally in conversation. The texts they are learning from are often too rigid and a little anachronistic.

I'm often discussing the differences between British, American and Australian English with them, it's a lot of fun and quite fascinating.

FWIW most of my students find Americans (via TV shows) far easier to understand than Aussies. Generalising of course but this is because, our unusual accent aside, we tend to drawl and are lazy with our articulation of consonants. There are also quite a few words that Americans tend to pronounce more phonetically and logically.

I went to the US when I was 18 having studied English since I was 8, and had gone to an American high school in Brazil. I had no problem writing and speaking in English, but had trouble with day to day conversation initially. No idea of slang, idiomatic expression, and such. This was 1990, and there wasn't as much exposure to language such as Netflix and TV shows in General in Brazil, but still. It must have been entertaining to interact with me.

My wife, when she was interviewing for Google, had a video interview with an Australian. She almost panicked.

Originally Posted By: CowboyNQ
All of the above said, I feel that when considering conversational English, it's misleading to say "American English" and "British English" because there are so many significant regional variations within those countries. We have regional dialects too but you have to have a very good ear and have travelled quite a bit to pick them. Most Aussies can't, and foreigners definitely can't. They're "flat out" understanding us in the first place!


Well, the more you look into an individual country's language the more differences you see. A British person once showed me 3-4 different London 'dialects'. But I still feel there is a significant difference between US and UK to make a general distinction. But interesting point about less differences between Australian English.

As a Brazilian, I don't see a huge difference in Portuguese from the different regions, less than I see in American English (which is not that big, IMHO, either). But, you can typically spot where they are from, and it's more a case of pronunciation than dialect. You really have to go North to small towns to really start stumbling on different local idiomatic expressions. Portuguese from Portugal is interesting - It seems that folks from the big cities I can understand, but I've had problems understanding folks from small towns. Then there's Portuguese spoke in the former African colonies, and that's where the trouble starts..

I find these differences fascinating and it's always interesting to talk to people all over the world and learn these subtleties, thanks for sharing.

On a side note, I was surprised when I went to Valencia, Spain, 2 years ago. There were signs that read a lot like Catalan (which I'm familiar with), but reading up on it, it was Valencian. Apparently not much difference between the two (Valencian is a dialect of Catalan, apparently), but there was a strong regional pride of their local language. (Spanish folks please feel free to correct me!)

To wrap up - I'm responsible for Latin America for my company, and have to make slight language adjustments between Argentina, Chile and Mexico Spanish (and probably make more mistakes than I think I do)
_________________________
Korg Kronos X73 / ARP Odyssey / Yamaha CS6x / P140 / Motif ES Rack / Akai MPK249 / Roland D-05 / JP-08 / Novation Mininova / NL2X / Waldorf Pulse II
MBP-LOGIC
American Deluxe P-Bass, Yamaha RBX760

Top
#2980275 - 03/15/19 03:48 PM Re: OT: New [to me] Word of the day; bestie [Re: Rod S]
El Lobo Offline
Platinum Member

Registered: 12/23/14
Posts: 1224
Originally Posted By: Rod S
I had an Aussie professor in the US who used to finish phrases often with 'and then you're home and hosed'.
When I first saw that, I thought it meant you're home and have had a sufficient amount of beer to be thoroughly intoxicated.

Top
#2980277 - 03/15/19 03:53 PM Re: OT: New [to me] Word of the day; bestie [Re: El Lobo]
El Lobo Offline
Platinum Member

Registered: 12/23/14
Posts: 1224
I knew an Italian man who had trouble with American English idioms. He couldn't understand the phrase "pretty ugly" and he mixed up "piece of pie" and "easy as cake" as expressions of something being easy or quick to do. I still say those because I think they're more interesting ways of saying things.

It was easy as cake. No problem, it was a piece of pie.

Top
#2980292 - 03/15/19 06:17 PM Re: OT: New [to me] Word of the day; bestie [Re: El Lobo]
MotiDave Offline
MP Hall of Fame Member

Registered: 12/04/12
Posts: 2192
Loc: San Diego, CA USA
I lived in UK once for 6 months, incredibly different version of english is spoken there. they utilize none of my SoCal slang and I of course knew none of theirs.

I learned that brilliant can be applied to most any positive expression or emotion, cheers has almost as many positive meanings as aloha, and despite all of my consumed tv and movie education that a socal kid might be exposed to, one doesn't wander about calling women strangers "love" unless they want to be laughed at.

I also learned that the further from London a person was sired, the less intelligible they became to me. eventually they either got to the far north or west to Wales where I couldn't understand them at all.

two more tips for my continental amigos - if a noun which names something has more than 3 syllables, start dropping the middle syllables. Drop as many as you need to in order to get to 3 (usually). Leicestershire is pronounced Lestershire. Aficionados of Worcestershire sauce subconsciously know this - its "worstershire sauce".

Second, if you find a "W" somewhere in the middle of an item's name - odds are very high it is silent. ex: Warwick is pronounced "Warrick"

oh, one more - i discovered the average mechanic and bar server was better educated and more articulate than my college graduate friends in the US. don't act snooty if you wander over with a US degree ... its less impressive than one might hope.


Edited by MotiDave (03/15/19 06:21 PM)
_________________________
The baiting I do is purely for entertainment value. Please feel free to ignore it.

Top
#2980704 - 03/19/19 05:16 AM Re: OT: New [to me] Word of the day; bestie [Re: MotiDave]
Rod S Offline
MP Hall of Fame Member

Registered: 12/12/00
Posts: 3174
Loc: São Paulo, Brasil
Originally Posted By: MotiDave
two more tips for my continental amigos - if a noun which names something has more than 3 syllables, start dropping the middle syllables. Drop as many as you need to in order to get to 3 (usually). Leicestershire is pronounced Lestershire. Aficionados of Worcestershire sauce subconsciously know this - its "worstershire sauce".

That's a pretty funny and accurate (from a foreigner's perpective) explanation.

I was on a train station with my wife several ago in London (going to some town outside which I can't remember), when she asked some nice older gentleman for information on which train to get, and she mispronounced the city. He pretended not to understand her, and she kept getting more and more frustrated. I could tell he was pulling her leg, and I was trying not to laugh. He finally opened a smile and corrected her. We had a nice chat afterwards. British humour is different, but once you get it, it's a blast. I enjoy my time in the UK every single time.

Originally Posted By: MotiDave
oh, one more - i discovered the average mechanic and bar server was better educated and more articulate than my college graduate friends in the US. don't act snooty if you wander over with a US degree ... its less impressive than one might hope.

I hate to sound like an asshole, but most americans act snooty and pompous where abroad, regardless of the situation. I met Americans while traveling in over 20 different countries, from different US states, and the attitude is pretty common.

I lived in the US a lot of +10 years, and know this is not the attitude in the US, but abroad... wow.

That being said, a lot of Brazilians act like idiots (whether thinking they are smart, or whatever) when they are abroad. I stay away from my kind... (seriously). I'm fortunate on having lived in US, Europe and LA and can hopefully pick the best aspects of each culture to shape my actions and attitudes.
_________________________
Korg Kronos X73 / ARP Odyssey / Yamaha CS6x / P140 / Motif ES Rack / Akai MPK249 / Roland D-05 / JP-08 / Novation Mininova / NL2X / Waldorf Pulse II
MBP-LOGIC
American Deluxe P-Bass, Yamaha RBX760

Top
#2980766 - 03/19/19 11:09 AM Re: OT: New [to me] Word of the day; bestie [Re: Rod S]
CowboyNQ Offline
Platinum Member

Registered: 06/14/15
Posts: 1181
Loc: Adelaide, Australia
Rod you probably should re-read that post with your “irony” hat on.

I’ve bumped into plenty of US and Brazilian folk in my extensive travels within my own country and have found them, almost without exception, to be very agreeable and friendly.

Top
#2980770 - 03/19/19 11:24 AM Re: OT: New [to me] Word of the day; bestie [Re: El Lobo]
Wastrel Offline
MP Hall of Fame Member

Registered: 05/13/09
Posts: 2834
Loc: Los Angeles
Originally Posted By: El Lobo
I knew an Italian man who had trouble with American English idioms.

I had a Swiss friend who at some point during his time in the US had heard and misunderstood someone saying that he'd gotten laid. He thought the saying was "I got late last night", as in he was out later than normal, and he adopted it into his English repertoire. He would say this at often inappropriate times and it was pretty dammed funny.
_________________________
“Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, it’s time to pause and reflect.”
-Mark Twain

Top
#2980773 - 03/19/19 11:26 AM Re: OT: New [to me] Word of the day; bestie [Re: MotiDave]
Wastrel Offline
MP Hall of Fame Member

Registered: 05/13/09
Posts: 2834
Loc: Los Angeles
Originally Posted By: MotiDave


Second, if you find a "W" somewhere in the middle of an item's name - odds are very high it is silent. ex: Warwick is pronounced "Warrick"

That's true in New England as well. I used to live in "Warrick", Rhode Island.
_________________________
“Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, it’s time to pause and reflect.”
-Mark Twain

Top
#2980787 - 03/19/19 12:27 PM Re: OT: New [to me] Word of the day; bestie [Re: Rod S]
GregC Offline
MP Hall of Fame Member

Registered: 10/26/03
Posts: 6395
Loc: Discovery Bay, California
Originally Posted By: Rod S
[q



. I'm fortunate on having lived in US, Europe and LA and can hopefully pick the best aspects of each culture to shape my actions and attitudes.


I am not normally a nit picker but I find it amusing how you inferred LA is a separate country. [ I don't believe LA is Louisiana.

Lets check in with our fellow Angelenos. Is LA a country separate from the US ?
wink
_________________________
Innovation is never a single event. It is a long process of discovery, engineering, and transformation.
My Soundcloud with many originals:
https://soundcloud.com/user-898236994

Top
#2980792 - 03/19/19 12:45 PM Re: OT: New [to me] Word of the day; bestie [Re: GregC]
Wastrel Offline
MP Hall of Fame Member

Registered: 05/13/09
Posts: 2834
Loc: Los Angeles
LA == Lesser Antilles? idk
_________________________
“Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, it’s time to pause and reflect.”
-Mark Twain

Top
#2980801 - 03/19/19 01:25 PM Re: OT: New [to me] Word of the day; bestie [Re: GregC]
Rod S Offline
MP Hall of Fame Member

Registered: 12/12/00
Posts: 3174
Loc: São Paulo, Brasil
Originally Posted By: GregC

I am not normally a nit picker but I find it amusing how you inferred LA is a separate country. [ I don't believe LA is Louisiana.

Lets check in with our fellow Angelenos. Is LA a country separate from the US ?
wink


LA - Latin America. You get used to certain acronyms that you type without noticing! Most multinational companies bunch both south and central america as LA, which I use the term often...
_________________________
Korg Kronos X73 / ARP Odyssey / Yamaha CS6x / P140 / Motif ES Rack / Akai MPK249 / Roland D-05 / JP-08 / Novation Mininova / NL2X / Waldorf Pulse II
MBP-LOGIC
American Deluxe P-Bass, Yamaha RBX760

Top
#2980802 - 03/19/19 01:37 PM Re: OT: New [to me] Word of the day; bestie [Re: CowboyNQ]
Rod S Offline
MP Hall of Fame Member

Registered: 12/12/00
Posts: 3174
Loc: São Paulo, Brasil
Originally Posted By: CowboyNQ
Rod you probably should re-read that post with your “irony” hat on.

I’ve bumped into plenty of US and Brazilian folk in my extensive travels within my own country and have found them, almost without exception, to be very agreeable and friendly.


There was a sarcasm to my comment, but your comment and mine and are not mutually exclusive. You can be friendly and still act superior, which I was alluding. And Brazilian's are friendly as hell; and still think you're naive and a fool.

Also, as I Australian, you're not exposed to the folks acting superior when they know your nationality, which is the case when you're from certain countries (plus I consider Australians extremely easy going and friendly in general, so you're biased...LOL).

My English is good enough that I can pass by an American that's been an expatriate for so long he's mixing in foreign accents, and I've played this game a few times, without fail - different attitudes everytime.

YMMV

And I'm glad you had good experiences. So have I.
_________________________
Korg Kronos X73 / ARP Odyssey / Yamaha CS6x / P140 / Motif ES Rack / Akai MPK249 / Roland D-05 / JP-08 / Novation Mininova / NL2X / Waldorf Pulse II
MBP-LOGIC
American Deluxe P-Bass, Yamaha RBX760

Top
#2980816 - 03/19/19 02:41 PM Re: OT: New [to me] Word of the day; bestie [Re: Wastrel]
GregC Offline
MP Hall of Fame Member

Registered: 10/26/03
Posts: 6395
Loc: Discovery Bay, California
Originally Posted By: Wastrel
LA == Lesser Antilles? idk


Los Alamos ? Latvian Airport ?
[practicing selective reading]
_________________________
Innovation is never a single event. It is a long process of discovery, engineering, and transformation.
My Soundcloud with many originals:
https://soundcloud.com/user-898236994

Top
#2980939 - 03/20/19 07:11 AM Re: OT: New [to me] Word of the day; bestie [Re: GregC]
Wastrel Offline
MP Hall of Fame Member

Registered: 05/13/09
Posts: 2834
Loc: Los Angeles
Originally Posted By: GregC
Originally Posted By: Wastrel
LA == Lesser Antilles? idk


Los Alamos ? Latvian Airport ?
[practicing selective reading]

One time I was sitting in a bar in Memphis and the locals spotted me as an outlander - probably because I wasn't wearing a NASCAR hat - and the guy next to me asked
Where y'all from?
LA
Shreveport?
_________________________
“Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, it’s time to pause and reflect.”
-Mark Twain

Top
#2980941 - 03/20/19 07:20 AM Re: OT: New [to me] Word of the day; bestie [Re: Wastrel]
GregC Offline
MP Hall of Fame Member

Registered: 10/26/03
Posts: 6395
Loc: Discovery Bay, California
Originally Posted By: Wastrel
Originally Posted By: GregC
Originally Posted By: Wastrel
LA == Lesser Antilles? idk


Los Alamos ? Latvian Airport ?
[practicing selective reading]

One time I was sitting in a bar in Memphis and the locals spotted me as an outlander - probably because I wasn't wearing a NASCAR hat - and the guy next to me asked
Where y'all from?
LA
Shreveport?


back in the days when I travelled for business in our states, I got the same question. and replied " San Francisco " . Half the time folks raved about the City and the other half recoiled from my presence, made the stereotypical remarks. . Attitudes are often set in stone.
_________________________
Innovation is never a single event. It is a long process of discovery, engineering, and transformation.
My Soundcloud with many originals:
https://soundcloud.com/user-898236994

Top
#2980945 - 03/20/19 07:48 AM Re: OT: New [to me] Word of the day; bestie [Re: GregC]
Synthoid Offline
10k Club

Registered: 12/04/03
Posts: 10906
Loc: Pennsylvania, USA


_________________________
When an eel hits your eye like a big pizza pie, that's a Moray.

Top
#2980961 - 03/20/19 09:29 AM Re: OT: New [to me] Word of the day; bestie [Re: Synthoid]
Joe Muscara Offline
Triple Secret Banninated
20k Club

Registered: 02/21/05
Posts: 20334
Loc: Heaven, Hell, or Houston
I've long presumed that the restaurant is Los Angeles Crawfish and the gym is Louisiana Fitness. Drives my wife crazy. grin
_________________________
The great thing about music is that there's always something to learn. The frustrating thing about music is that there's always something to learn!

Top
Page 2 of 2 < 1 2


Moderator:  Dave Bryce, Stephen Fortner